Emergency braking practice - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 12:24 AM Thread Starter
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Emergency braking practice

Today I was accelerating from a stop light and two cars in front of me started to brake. I saw a turn off ahead and I guess my brain assumed they would be slowing for that turn as a started applying the brakes. Anyway they quickly just stopped in the road and I found I was closing way too rapidly. Although I did lockup the back wheel for a second, I got it rolling before I got too sideways and was able to stop without incident. (never saw why they stopped?)

I've been riding a little over a year and this was the closest call yet. I was really glad I try to practice emergency stopping. We get to practice turns and general bike handling many times every ride, but most rides don't see hard braking drills. As I gain riding skills I have noticed it is easy to out ride my ability to stop. I try to take some time about once a month to practice emergency braking on a back road coming home. I pick a mail box and stop as quickly as I can trying to get a feel for when I'm about to lockup either wheel. I notice how much I'm use to the ABS brakes on my car! I guess I need more practice.

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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 07:59 AM
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You are right, most people don't practice that enough. A good suggested practice is to NOT use the back brake while practicing sometimes. It trains you to not rely on the rear brake. While you're at it, practice the emergency stop, then take off without putting your feet down, making sure you come to a complete stop before taking off. Sometimes when you need to perform an emergency stop, you also need to perform an emergency get away. Like in your situation, a car could have been behind you and not paying attention to everyone stopping in front of them. You may have needed to scoot to one side or the other of the stopped cars in front of you to avoid being rear ended. It's a real confidence booster when you master that technique, and the goal is to practice enough to build in auto-responses.

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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by rlawrence View Post
Today I was accelerating from a stop light and two cars in front of me started to brake. I saw a turn off ahead and I guess my brain assumed they would be slowing for that turn as a started applying the brakes. Anyway they quickly just stopped in the road and I found I was closing way too rapidly. Although I did lockup the back wheel for a second, I got it rolling before I got too sideways and was able to stop without incident. (never saw why they stopped?)

I've been riding a little over a year and this was the closest call yet. I was really glad I try to practice emergency stopping. We get to practice turns and general bike handling many times every ride, but most rides don't see hard braking drills. As I gain riding skills I have noticed it is easy to out ride my ability to stop. I try to take some time about once a month to practice emergency braking on a back road coming home. I pick a mail box and stop as quickly as I can trying to get a feel for when I'm about to lockup either wheel. I notice how much I'm use to the ABS brakes on my car! I guess I need more practice.
Good on you.

Virtually all our stopping power is in the front but, in a panic, we tend towards that rear brake and are worried about using the front too much and, as a consequence, use it nowhere near as much as we could. If your rear isn't damn near coming off the ground, you ain't applying enough front. In fact, one drill I was taught was, on smaller bikes, to GET the rear off the ground while maintaining balance and control in the front. Scary as hell but, it can be done.

I know I am a broken record but, again, dirt bikes are awesome for skills development. Learning to do a 'stoppie' on a dirt bike is a damn sight safer and cheaper than on the street. It won't be the same on the street but, developing the feel for it does nothing but help.
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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 09:02 AM
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Good on you.

Virtually all our stopping power is in the front but, in a panic, we tend towards that rear brake and are worried about using the front too much and, as a consequence, use it nowhere near as much as we could. If your rear isn't damn near coming off the ground, you ain't applying enough front. In fact, one drill I was taught was, on smaller bikes, to GET the rear off the ground while maintaining balance and control in the front. Scary as hell but, it can be done.

I know I am a broken record but, again, dirt bikes are awesome for skills development. Learning to do a 'stoppie' on a dirt bike is a damn sight safer and cheaper than on the street. It won't be the same on the street but, developing the feel for it does nothing but help.
I totally agree with the dirt bike stuff. I wear out front pads on my dirt bike as quick or quicker than the rears. That's virtually unheard of. I know a guy that took the rear brake lever off of his kids dirt bikes when they were learning. They were made to learn perfect control with the front brake. Then when they got their rear brakes back that was used in assistance with the front.

As a trail and hare scramble rider the rear brake is used for getting the bike lined up out of a corner, or setting the bike into the rut on the track/trail. The front brake is what sets you at the speed you want to enter at.

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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 10:02 AM
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Front brake GOOD!!👍


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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 10:03 AM
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Front brake GOOD!!👍


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Double +1 on that...

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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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Hey thanks for the tips. I didnt think about accelerating after the stop. That's a great idea. To tell you the truth I didn't even think about what was behind me when I saw how fast his rear bumper was approaching . I'm going to add quickly moving to the side or center of the road after braking to my drill so it becomes 2nd nature. Even though I got on the rear brake a bit too hard, since I have done it many times in pratice it was easy to recover and I didn't panic. So I'm a big fan of praticing stops!

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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-13-2014, 01:57 PM
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quick braking is good to learn, but also learning what your escape paths are. if something happens in front of you and you need to make a sudden decision, sometimes the best one is to move your bike into a different trajectory, ie. swerve around whatever object you are about to hit. when i ride, i try to make it a point to always ride in a position where i can move my bike to the left or right if something happens and i don't have enough time to make an emergency stop. and even if you do manage to make a good sudden stop, there's a chance the vehicle behind you might not be able to and could hit you even though you made a good emergency stop.

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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 11-07-2014, 08:53 PM
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Glad I was directed to this thread by another member, some more ?'s

I had a issue today on the road : I had a light change to red on a 55mph rd with 2 cars that possibly stopped on the tail end of yellow, whatever. I had to slow quickly. but didnt want to slide locking up the brakes. Upon complete stop I was front wheel length past the car in front of me to the right(trying to make room to slow w/o smacking into it). I was braking and downshifting to a stop. It was a bit on the scary side.

I always have plenty of room in front, being the super new rider that I am(not this time obviously). Very aware of all cars around me and a tendency to slow a bit early at this point. I have respect for my bike and want to be safe.

That being said can I get some input? How fast can I stop with out sliding and possibly wrecking? That is my main goal saftey. Brake? Downshift? Front/Back brake?

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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 11-08-2014, 06:49 AM
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Im one of the lucky ones to have a motorcycle test court at my nearby DMV office, which they encourage people to use on the weekends and after hours when they are closed.

There is a "braking" area to test your skills, your post reminds me that I have not taken the new Road King and tried it yet. I do have ABS on this bike, honestly one of the requirements I had for a new bike.
Im curious if, on the day I picked it up (no less,Ha) I had to slam stop on the interstate as traffic backed up. I made both front and rear tires chrip and leave a small rubber patch for the front and rear tire. I didnt feel the ABS kick in but I am assuming it had to because damn, I stopped so quickly and straight as an arrow, it was either that or I made the perfect stop on my own, which I would question as I too, have started to slide the rear tire a few times when I had the 1300 tourer. SO I am unsure, maybe next warm day I will get over to the DMV and try the RK out.

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