2018 Yamaha Star Venture Transcontinental Tire Wear Predictions - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 11:02 AM Thread Starter
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2018 Yamaha Star Venture Transcontinental Tire Wear Predictions

Because this bike was only released in December/January tire wear is pretty much an unknown for it.

Well maybe not, I had to change out my rear tire because I picked up a screw and due to the size of the screw and the angle it penetrated the tire I had to replace the rear tire.

I started thinking that this would be a good time to measure the tread depth of both the original tire and the brand new tire.

Both are the Bridgestone Excedra G852.

The new tire has 9/32 of tread when measured with a tread depth gauge.

The old tire had 8/32 of tread when measured with a tread depth gauge. Total mileage on the old tire when I removed it was 3,291 miles.

Now tire wear always depends on how hard you are on the throttle, myself I am not that hard on the throttle as I like a more laid back ride experience.

So lets take 3,291 X 7 for each 1/32 of tread ware and we can extrapolate out estimated tire wear.

3291 X 7 = 23,037 miles

Now remember this is an estimate but it is drawn off a real tire that had 3,291 miles on it and had used 1/32 of the tread when measured with a tread depth gauge.

I am thinking we should be able to get 20,000 miles out of these tires pretty easy as long as you are not hard on the throttle all the time.

I know Michelin claims their Commander II tires are good for about 26,000 miles, I had a set of Commander II tires on my 2016 Harley Davidson Ultra Limited Low and had 14,000 miles on them when I traded it in and those tires still had another 8,000 to 10,000 miles left in them in my opinion as they still had plenty of tread depth left on them.

Sadly Michelin does not make a Commander II tire that fits the Yamaha Star Venture, but if what I am seeing in the limited mileage and replacing the rear tire on my Star Venture this Bridgestone Excedra G852 may be a competitor in the mileage wars with the Michelin Commander II line of tires.

Now understand that my estimate includes still having 2/32's tread left on the tire when changing it out.

Last edited by American; 06-24-2018 at 11:17 AM.
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 05:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by American View Post
Because this bike was only released in December/January tire wear is pretty much an unknown for it.

Well maybe not, I had to change out my rear tire because I picked up a screw and due to the size of the screw and the angle it penetrated the tire I had to replace the rear tire.

I started thinking that this would be a good time to measure the tread depth of both the original tire and the brand new tire.

Both are the Bridgestone Excedra G852.

The new tire has 9/32 of tread when measured with a tread depth gauge.

The old tire had 8/32 of tread when measured with a tread depth gauge. Total mileage on the old tire when I removed it was 3,291 miles.

Now tire wear always depends on how hard you are on the throttle, myself I am not that hard on the throttle as I like a more laid back ride experience.

So lets take 3,291 X 7 for each 1/32 of tread ware and we can extrapolate out estimated tire wear.

3291 X 7 = 23,037 miles

Now remember this is an estimate but it is drawn off a real tire that had 3,291 miles on it and had used 1/32 of the tread when measured with a tread depth gauge.

I am thinking we should be able to get 20,000 miles out of these tires pretty easy as long as you are not hard on the throttle all the time.

I know Michelin claims their Commander II tires are good for about 26,000 miles, I had a set of Commander II tires on my 2016 Harley Davidson Ultra Limited Low and had 14,000 miles on them when I traded it in and those tires still had another 8,000 to 10,000 miles left in them in my opinion as they still had plenty of tread depth left on them.

Sadly Michelin does not make a Commander II tire that fits the Yamaha Star Venture, but if what I am seeing in the limited mileage and replacing the rear tire on my Star Venture this Bridgestone Excedra G852 may be a competitor in the mileage wars with the Michelin Commander II line of tires.

Now understand that my estimate includes still having 2/32's tread left on the tire when changing it out.
Great post, American! Thanks for posting this!

I let the torque and not added throttle rotation, now do the work of getting us up to speed. I run the 113 C.I. like a commercial diesel...and set a throttle position, and let the engine's torque curve take us to the next shift point. I'm also doing this, for less torque stress on the belt drive. Same for down shifting. I let the bike go to 2,000 RPM, and then match the tranny spin to about that...just before clutch engagement...to reduce also, any back-torque on said belt. I want to maximize the belt, and minimize the (if any) belt slack adjustments, by riding in this manner. When we got the SVTC, we still had a GoldWing mindset...and operated on the highway at 70-75 mph. With how relaxing this motorcycle is...and with the heightened sense of ride enjoyment for the both of us...we now enjoy a highway speed of 60 mph locked by cruise control. The ride is extended to destination, and less atmospheric 'noise', let alone probably a benefit in less heat and torque generated on the tire treads. Also, the sound system sounds better at wind speeds of 60 mph and lower, rather than 60 mph and higher. In a word...lovin' it! While we also listen to music through our headsets, the really great sound from the surround speaker system, has us listening to the bike's sound system, with the added benefit of my wife using BOTH systems...her helmet for non-wind adulterated output, but now with the surround and bass response of the speakers to her left and right. On this bike...she now has the best of both systems, all at the same time. For myself, I usually ride with the sound either coming from my helmet, or from the SVTC. In her case, having both sound sources totally eradicates quality sound loss due to speed and wind. Gawd, Bill..she is sweet on this bike! She said..."I did well, last October". "Thank you, Hon..." , and I shift a gear....!

Joe

Last edited by YamahaParExcellence; 06-24-2018 at 05:43 PM.
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 07:39 PM Thread Starter
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Let me ease your concern over the drive belt, I have now had three motorcycles that are belt drive, 2013 Victory Cross Country Tour, 2016 Harley Davidson Ultra Limited Low and now this Yamaha Star Venture Transcontinental.

Victory recommended replacing the drive belt every 30,000 miles, but few Victory owners ever replace the drive belt at 30,000 miles, the drive belts easily went over 60,000 miles and most still had not changed the drive belt. I did change my Victory's drive belt at 34,000 miles and I put an aftermarket rear pulley on the rear wheel, but the drive belt could have went many thousands of miles more. Replacing the Victory drive belt was not that bad of a job.

Harley only says to inspect the drive belt and if damage is found to replace it, however replacing a Harley drive belt on a twin cam engine is a pain and if done at a dealer can cost around $1,300 dollars in parts and labor. My Harley's drive belt still looked great when I traded it in with 27,000 miles on it.

Yamaha is pretty much like Harley as far as the drive belt goes, you inspect it and if you find damage you replace it. The good thing is the Yamaha is more like the Victory when it comes to changing the drive belt as from what I see in the service manual it is almost as easy as the Victory.

These drive belts should go 100,000 miles if not damaged by a stone. Many Harley's regularly run the drive belts 100,000 plus miles.

As for adjusting, you may have to do an initial adjustment but after that it will pretty much be set From that point forward. Just check it but I bet you will find you will rarely ever need to adjust it. If you do adjust it, I recommend adjusting it to the high side of the spec as a belt that is just a tad loose is far better than a belt that is a tad to tight, to tight will cause accelerated ware to the bearings and belt.

If you change your own tires count the number of lines on each side of the swing arm it is set at and when you put it back together adjust it to the same setting and you should be good to go, of course check it to make sure but these belts are pretty stout.

Last edited by American; 06-24-2018 at 07:42 PM.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-25-2018, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by American View Post
Let me ease your concern over the drive belt, I have now had three motorcycles that are belt drive, 2013 Victory Cross Country Tour, 2016 Harley Davidson Ultra Limited Low and now this Yamaha Star Venture Transcontinental.

Victory recommended replacing the drive belt every 30,000 miles, but few Victory owners ever replace the drive belt at 30,000 miles, the drive belts easily went over 60,000 miles and most still had not changed the drive belt. I did change my Victory's drive belt at 34,000 miles and I put an aftermarket rear pulley on the rear wheel, but the drive belt could have went many thousands of miles more. Replacing the Victory drive belt was not that bad of a job.

Harley only says to inspect the drive belt and if damage is found to replace it, however replacing a Harley drive belt on a twin cam engine is a pain and if done at a dealer can cost around $1,300 dollars in parts and labor. My Harley's drive belt still looked great when I traded it in with 27,000 miles on it.

Yamaha is pretty much like Harley as far as the drive belt goes, you inspect it and if you find damage you replace it. The good thing is the Yamaha is more like the Victory when it comes to changing the drive belt as from what I see in the service manual it is almost as easy as the Victory.

These drive belts should go 100,000 miles if not damaged by a stone. Many Harley's regularly run the drive belts 100,000 plus miles.

As for adjusting, you may have to do an initial adjustment but after that it will pretty much be set From that point forward. Just check it but I bet you will find you will rarely ever need to adjust it. If you do adjust it, I recommend adjusting it to the high side of the spec as a belt that is just a tad loose is far better than a belt that is a tad to tight, to tight will cause accelerated ware to the bearings and belt.

If you change your own tires count the number of lines on each side of the swing arm it is set at and when you put it back together adjust it to the same setting and you should be good to go, of course check it to make sure but these belts are pretty stout.
Thanks for all that, Bill. My first bike with a belt...so this will be a learning experience. To get to a family cottage, I have to take to a dirt and stone strewn road...but I go very slow...the 1/3 mile off of paved road, to get there. I guess you can get a stone, by the rear tread throwing it up onto the belt?
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-25-2018, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YamahaParExcellence View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by American View Post
Because this bike was only released in December/January tire wear is pretty much an unknown for it.

Well maybe not, I had to change out my rear tire because I picked up a screw and due to the size of the screw and the angle it penetrated the tire I had to replace the rear tire.

I started thinking that this would be a good time to measure the tread depth of both the original tire and the brand new tire.

Both are the Bridgestone Excedra G852.

The new tire has 9/32 of tread when measured with a tread depth gauge.

The old tire had 8/32 of tread when measured with a tread depth gauge. Total mileage on the old tire when I removed it was 3,291 miles.

Now tire wear always depends on how hard you are on the throttle, myself I am not that hard on the throttle as I like a more laid back ride experience.

So lets take 3,291 X 7 for each 1/32 of tread ware and we can extrapolate out estimated tire wear.

3291 X 7 = 23,037 miles

Now remember this is an estimate but it is drawn off a real tire that had 3,291 miles on it and had used 1/32 of the tread when measured with a tread depth gauge.

I am thinking we should be able to get 20,000 miles out of these tires pretty easy as long as you are not hard on the throttle all the time.

I know Michelin claims their Commander II tires are good for about 26,000 miles, I had a set of Commander II tires on my 2016 Harley Davidson Ultra Limited Low and had 14,000 miles on them when I traded it in and those tires still had another 8,000 to 10,000 miles left in them in my opinion as they still had plenty of tread depth left on them.

Sadly Michelin does not make a Commander II tire that fits the Yamaha Star Venture, but if what I am seeing in the limited mileage and replacing the rear tire on my Star Venture this Bridgestone Excedra G852 may be a competitor in the mileage wars with the Michelin Commander II line of tires.

Now understand that my estimate includes still having 2/32's tread left on the tire when changing it out.
Great post, American! Thanks for posting this!

I let the torque and not added throttle rotation, now do the work of getting us up to speed. I run the 113 C.I. like a commercial diesel...and set a throttle position, and let the engine's torque curve take us to the next shift point. I'm also doing this, for less torque stress on the belt drive. Same for down shifting. I let the bike go to 2,000 RPM, and then match the tranny spin to about that...just before clutch engagement...to reduce also, any back-torque on said belt. I want to maximize the belt, and minimize the (if any) belt slack adjustments, by riding in this manner. When we got the SVTC, we still had a GoldWing mindset...and operated on the highway at 70-75 mph. With how relaxing this motorcycle is...and with the heightened sense of ride enjoyment for the both of us...we now enjoy a highway speed of 60 mph locked by cruise control. The ride is extended to destination, and less atmospheric 'noise', let alone probably a benefit in less heat and torque generated on the tire treads. Also, the sound system sounds better at wind speeds of 60 mph and lower, rather than 60 mph and higher. In a word...lovin' it! While we also listen to music through our headsets, the really great sound from the surround speaker system, has us listening to the bike's sound system, with the added benefit of my wife using BOTH systems...her helmet for non-wind adulterated output, but now with the surround and bass response of the speakers to her left and right. On this bike...she now has the best of both systems, all at the same time. For myself, I usually ride with the sound either coming from my helmet, or from the SVTC. In her case, having both sound sources totally eradicates quality sound loss due to speed and wind. Gawd, Bill..she is sweet on this bike! She said..."I did well, last October". "Thank you, Hon..." , and I shift a gear....[IMG class=inlineimg]/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif[/IMG]!

Joe
That fits right in with my wear assessment at 8k miles. I’m not even half tread wear at this point.
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