Purchase decision for future tire changes - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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Purchase decision for future tire changes

I currently own a No-mar Jr. Pro manual tire changer, it has been a good tire changer but these new rear tires being such a low profile and the tire is so stiff it is hard to work the tire into the rims drop center. I ended up taking my rear tire to a bike shop and had them finish installing the second bead onto the rim with their powered tire changer machine. Took them all of 60 seconds to get the second bead onto the rim.

So I have decided to move on from my No-mar Jr. Pro manual tire changer and I am looking at powered motorcycle tire changers, I am really liking this one so far. Cost will be a little over $2,000 dollars but I do my own tire changes and it is worth the cost to me. My No-mar Jr. Pro was just over the thousand dollar mark. Personally I am not impressed with No-mar's Cycle Hill tire changes, they are a down grade from the No-mar tire changers they sell/sold, they no longer offer the Jr. Pro model I have and have replaced it with the Cycle Hill CH200 but I can see areas where they really down graded the build of the CH200 to reach the price point they are selling it at.

At any rate as I get older it is time to move on to better equipment that will make my life easier when I change tires on my Yamaha Star Venture Transcontinental.

What do you think about this machine?


Last edited by American; 06-24-2018 at 12:16 PM.
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 01:50 PM
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Looks like a great machine. I'm one that believes that the right tool makes the job. I do all, and I mean all repair on every vehicle I own except transmissions. I own 90% on the tools to complete this task. Some tools I can't justify the cost for a DIY guy, plasma cutter, I'm really good with a touch, stand alone coil spring compresser, smaller manually type work good for the occasional job, TIG welder, between my stick and MIG with aluminum attachment not much I can't do. That's a few I just can't justify. A motorcycle tire changer would fall in that category. I ride an average of just over 12k miles a year and my Michelin commander tires last me 2 years. The last 2 sets I purchased at Cycle Gear who priced matched and will mount along with balance for $25. So my payoff on tire changer would be 80 years. It would be convenient but I couldn't justify. I know a lot of custom car builders and they don't have a chrome setup. Anyway, Just something to think about.

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
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Considering where I live the cost to change front and rear tires at a local shop is just over 600 dollars, it comes out to 250 dollars after I remove the cost of the tires.

I have changed a total of four sets of motorcycle tires with the No-mar manual tire changer not including the rear tire on this Yamaha Star Venture, so that is 250 x 4 = 1,000 dollars add in the cost of the rear tire on this Star Venture and figure a minimum of 150 due to removing the saddle bags and mufflers and I am up to 1,150 dollars and that would be half the cost of the powered machine so it would not take me long to make it pay for itself.

That does not include my truck when I bought new rims and tires for it after I bought the truck. I did those on the No-Mar as well. So the No-mar paid for itself in 3 1/2 years for me as it cost me about 1,150 dollars. I have no problem with the cost of a powered tire changer, it is for my own benefit.

You still need to add in the cost of labor as your time is still valuable and has to be counted.

The problem where I live is trying to get a shop to change the tires on the rims alone is they want you to leave the tires and they will get to it when they can so three days later you might get your tires back and here they charge 50 dollars per wheel/tire so it is going to cost 100 dollars, I use counteract balance beads so balancing is a non issue. Some shops just refuse to do it giving you a 1001 excuses as to why they don't want to do it.

We know why they don't want to do it is because they either want the entire job or they feel they are punishing you by making you run around town until you can find someone who will change the tires.

So for me I save 250 up front by doing the work myself, then I save 100 from not having to pay a shop to mount the tires on the rims so that is 350 dollars up front per set of tires. Just 7 tire changes on the motorcycle would pay for itself but add in my truck and my wife's car and it would likely pay for itself in about 4 to 4 1/2 years time for me.

Last edited by American; 06-24-2018 at 07:47 PM.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by American View Post
Considering where I live the cost to change front and rear tires at a local shop is just over 600 dollars, it comes out to 250 dollars after I remove the cost of the tires.

I have changed a total of four sets of motorcycle tires with the No-mar manual tire changer not including the rear tire on this Yamaha Star Venture, so that is 250 x 4 = 1,000 dollars add in the cost of the rear tire on this Star Venture and figure a minimum of 150 due to removing the saddle bags and mufflers and I am up to 1,150 dollars and that would be half the cost of the powered machine so it would not take me long to make it pay for itself.

That does not include my truck when I bought new rims and tires for it after I bought the truck. I did those on the No-Mar as well. So the No-mar paid for itself in 3 1/2 years for me as it cost me about 1,150 dollars. I have no problem with the cost of a powered tire changer, it is for my own benefit.

You still need to add in the cost of labor as your time is still valuable and has to be counted.

The problem where I live is trying to get a shop to change the tires on the rims alone is they want you to leave the tires and they will get to it when they can so three days later you might get your tires back and here they charge 50 dollars per wheel/tire so it is going to cost 100 dollars, I use counteract balance beads so balancing is a none issue. Some shops just refuse to do it giving you a 1001 excuses as to why they don't want to do it.

We know why they don't want to do it is because they either want the entire job or they feel they are punishing you by making you run around town until you can find someone who will change the tires.

So for me I save 250 up front by doing the work myself, then I save 100 from not having to pay a shop to mount the tires on the rims so that is 350 dollars up front per set of tires. Just 7 tire changes on the motorcycle would pay for itself but add in my truck and my wife's car and it would likely pay for itself in about 4 to 4 1/2 years time for me.
That makes since. Guess I'm spoiled living in Houston and having cost effective alternatives. I takes me about 30 minutes to get my new tire installed and it's only about 20 minutes away. In your case I say go for it as it looks like a great machine.

2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), Cobra Slash Cut full exhaust, Dropped 1 inch with lowering links, ORK, 4.5 inch handlebar risers, Ultimate passenger seat, Passenger pegs moved forward 4 inches, Handlebar clock, KN air filter, Viking saddlebags, Additional rear lighting
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2006 Harley Electra Glide Ultra Classic

https://sites.google.com/site/vstar1100kb/home
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lesblank View Post
Looks like a great machine. I'm one that believes that the right tool makes the job. I do all, and I mean all repair on every vehicle I own except transmissions. I own 90% on the tools to complete this task. Some tools I can't justify the cost for a DIY guy, plasma cutter, I'm really good with a touch, stand alone coil spring compresser, smaller manually type work good for the occasional job, TIG welder, between my stick and MIG with aluminum attachment not much I can't do. That's a few I just can't justify. A motorcycle tire changer would fall in that category. I ride an average of just over 12k miles a year and my Michelin commander tires last me 2 years. The last 2 sets I purchased at Cycle Gear who priced matched and will mount along with balance for $25. So my payoff on tire changer would be 80 years. It would be convenient but I couldn't justify. I know a lot of custom car builders and they don't have a chrome setup. Anyway, Just something to think about.
In reading American's (Bill) reasoning to purchase, I was thinking that my local shop will dismount/mount/balance both the front and rear tires on my SVTC for $110.00. $50.00 for the front, and $60 for the back, and that includes balancing. So, it appears that I am asked to pay less than half of what Bill's local dealers bill. Then, tax on the $110.00 to finish the out-the-door bill. They do all the work, are on the hook for any damage that might arise in dismount/mount and, at his cost to own, with tax, against my spending 45 minutes sipping a coffee at the dealer....would be equal to 23 full set tire swap outs. That to me, would also be 23x 12,000 miles, or 276,000 miles needing to be ridden to just break even on having that in my garage.



Joe

Last edited by YamahaParExcellence; 06-24-2018 at 04:39 PM.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by lesblank View Post
That makes since. Guess I'm spoiled living in Houston and having cost effective alternatives. I takes me about 30 minutes to get my new tire installed and it's only about 20 minutes away. In your case I say go for it as it looks like a great machine.
What does it cost you at your dealer for dismount and mount/balance? Mine is $50.00 for the front axle, and $60.00 for the back, and that includes their labor to take off the bike and re and re. No bringing in of tires and already removed rims. What's going on in the state of Florida?

So, $110.00 in labor, plus 13 % tax (in Ontario, Canada) for a total of: $124.30 per new tire set for shop labor to mount. There is about a $10.00 difference between my Yamaha Dealer, and my Kawasaki Dealer...for both my bikes.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-24-2018, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
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You guys are lucky to have places to go that will do the work at a reasonable price, remember I live in the retirement capitol of the world, "Florida" and they are not shy about charging you top dollar for everything.

The only real advantage to Florida anymore is the weather and no state income tax.

Also I am retired so for me it is something I enjoy doing working on the bike and doing my own maintenance, I did buy a three year maintenance contract on this bike only because it is a new model year with a lot of new tech and the maintenance schedule is a little more involved than my other bikes. By the time the contract is up we will know much more about these bikes and what they do need verse what they don't need.

Tires are a wear item so they are not included in the maintenance contract nor are brakes and such. I like doing my own brakes as well, I don't know just something about not having a lot of trust in dealer techs, to many are young kids who don't know what the heck they are doing and just got of some motorcycle training institute.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-25-2018, 07:03 AM
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You guys are lucky to have places to go that will do the work at a reasonable price, remember I live in the retirement capitol of the world, "Florida" and they are not shy about charging you top dollar for everything.

The only real advantage to Florida anymore is the weather and no state income tax.

Also I am retired so for me it is something I enjoy doing working on the bike and doing my own maintenance, I did buy a three year maintenance contract on this bike only because it is a new model year with a lot of new tech and the maintenance schedule is a little more involved than my other bikes. By the time the contract is up we will know much more about these bikes and what they do need verse what they don't need.

Tires are a wear item so they are not included in the maintenance contract nor are brakes and such. I like doing my own brakes as well, I don't know just something about not having a lot of trust in dealer techs, to many are young kids who don't know what the heck they are doing and just got of some motorcycle training institute.
Valid points, Bill.

Joe
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