Remove Rear Wheel - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-15-2017, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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Remove Rear Wheel

So I've got a tire ordered and on its way. My next decision is: do I remove the wheel and have the tire mounted, or do I let the shop do it all?

If I remove the wheel and take it and the new tire, the shop will mount and balance it for $25

If I take the bike in, I'll have to tow it, but they will do all the work and it will cost at least $50, but more likely around $75 because of the bags.

So, is it worth the extra trouble and money, or is it easy enough to do the work myself? I'm really only worried about putting the tire back on, wondering about bearings (do i need to replace them?) and belt tensioning (do I need anything special to get that right?) other than that, I've turned wrenches before, auto work is not new to me.
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Jason
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-15-2017, 11:03 AM
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This might help

2007 VStar 1300 Tourer
2008 HD Sportster 1200 Anniversary Edition
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-15-2017, 11:13 AM
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You will either need to take off the back fender to get the wheel out from under it

or raise the bike a couple feet up in the air to drop the tire down.

If you can handle one or the other, then no one will be more careful and attentive than you working on your bike.

If you need any special tools, the first time you do it yourself you will more than pay for them, compared to having the bike towed to a shop and repaired for you while you sip on coffee in the waiting area.

Last edited by KCW; 11-15-2017 at 03:17 PM.
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-15-2017, 11:22 AM Thread Starter
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Guitarkidd, I already saw that video, but that is a shaft drive and the part I'm worried about is getting the belt back on properly.

My last bike was a virago with a shaft drive and that was so easy to remove and replace the rear wheel.

Jason
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-15-2017, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post
Guitarkidd, I already saw that video, but that is a shaft drive and the part I'm worried about is getting the belt back on properly.

My last bike was a virago with a shaft drive and that was so easy to remove and replace the rear wheel.
Here is a video that might help! Also I would recommend going to harbor freight and getting you a motorcycle jack. Can get one for around $50. It will help when removing the wheel, and any other time you are working on your bike. It is also nice to have when polishing so that you can sit on a mechanic stool or a low chair and not have to bend down
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 06:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KCW View Post
You will either need to take off the back fender to get the wheel out from under it

or raise the bike a couple feet up in the air to drop the tire down.

If you can handle one or the other, then no one will be more careful and attentive than you working on your bike.

If you need any special tools, the first time you do it yourself you will more than pay for them, compared to having the bike towed to a shop and repaired for you while you sip on coffee in the waiting area.
some rear fenders will lift up by removing just two fender strut bolts a loosening the rest of the fasteners

dumb bikers don't get to be old bikers
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-19-2017, 03:17 PM
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In all honesty, have them do it IMHO.

Let me clarify: I'm a bike mechanic by profession. At my shop, I have access to a bike-lift with a rear-wheel cutout and all the tools I need to do it without even pulling the fender. Having pulled the rear wheel of many vstars of that vintage, including my own '07 1300 belt drive, it's certainly not a terrible job with the right setup.

But... I don't have all that at home. And with my personal VS, I had the local shop do it last time I needed tires. It was worth the $50 to not have to take my bike to the shop and spend the time to do it there. But that may be me: Ever hear the joke about how OB/GYN's have a terrible sex-life? You don't want to come home and deal with what you've been staring in the face all day.

If you truly want to get yourself set up to do your own work, then the investment (your time + money in tools/equipment) may be worth it.

If you're more a 'weekend warrior' (not that there's anything wrong with that) and won't recoup your investment by doing your own work, then it's probably better to spend the extra ~50 to have them do it.

Having said that, I would never consider doing it "on the ground". If a decent bike lift isn't in your plans or fit your space (decent home-use ones cost ~$1,000), then it's totally worth the extra money to have it done for you IMHO.

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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-20-2017, 08:00 AM
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Casey, I pretty much agree with what you posted. Everyone has a right to earn a living in whatever profession they desire and a good mechanic is worth his pay.

Its getting harder and harder to be a shadetree mechanic, the list of things things a person can wrench on in their own garage is getting smaller and smaller - so changing a wheel, spark plugs, brakes, oil and filter and doing valve timing is most of the list for most people.

There is one aspect though that is not obvious. If a person makes $20/ hr to earn $50 in pocket money they have to work more than 2 1/2 hours because of taxes - for some people its more like 4 hrs ($80) to take home $50.

and if he pays his mechanic $50, guess where half that is going: taxes on the mechanic and his business - so the mechanic ends up with $30 in his takehome pay.

This is the reason if it takes me 4 hours to remove a wheel and it only takes the mechanic 1 hour - its a wash: I spend 4 hours at work, the mechanic works on my bike for an hour, he takes home $30, and the taxman gets $50.

Last edited by KCW; 11-20-2017 at 09:11 AM.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-21-2017, 06:06 AM
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i don't trust shops to do spoke wheels because the one time i had it done they pinched the tube and just patched it instead of replacing it. i didn't know about it for two years until i did the tires myself and saw the patch, after that i started doing all spoke wheels myself and just have the shop dynamically balance them, i learned how true them up also, it's a slow process but really not that hard to do as long as the rim isn't twisted

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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-21-2017, 07:04 AM
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Originally Posted by KCW View Post
Casey, I pretty much agree with what you posted. Everyone has a right to earn a living in whatever profession they desire and a good mechanic is worth his pay.

Its getting harder and harder to be a shadetree mechanic, the list of things things a person can wrench on in their own garage is getting smaller and smaller - so changing a wheel, spark plugs, brakes, oil and filter and doing valve timing is most of the list for most people.

There is one aspect though that is not obvious. If a person makes $20/ hr to earn $50 in pocket money they have to work more than 2 1/2 hours because of taxes - for some people its more like 4 hrs ($80) to take home $50.

and if he pays his mechanic $50, guess where half that is going: taxes on the mechanic and his business - so the mechanic ends up with $30 in his takehome pay.

This is the reason if it takes me 4 hours to remove a wheel and it only takes the mechanic 1 hour - its a wash: I spend 4 hours at work, the mechanic works on my bike for an hour, he takes home $30, and the taxman gets $50.
KCW - Good point I hadn't really thought of. I'm a "private" mechanic (we buy, restore & sell old bikes - don't take in 'public' work) so it hadn't occurred to me to think of it that way 'round.

I was really more just saying to me it's a PITA job working with the setups most of us have at home. But agreed even a PITA job can be worth it for a few extra bucks in pocket.

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