Star 650 Valve Adjustment Video - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
 13Likes
  • 4 Post By jcrubin
  • 2 Post By KCW
  • 3 Post By jcrubin
  • 2 Post By KCW
  • 2 Post By jcrubin
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019, 06:53 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
jcrubin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Clermont, FL
Posts: 39
Garage
Star 650 Valve Adjustment Video

Today we will be doing the inspection and adjustment of the valve lash on a Star 650, also known as a Vstar 650 or Dragstar 650, depending on where you live. This is an important, labor intensive, and often overlooked critical maintenance item that must be performed on any motor with solid lifters. There must be a prescribed amount of clearance and the margins are small, very small.

An opportune time to do this is any such occasion that the carbs are removed, such as a carb cleaning or rebuild. The 650, as opposed to the 1100 still requires much more faux chrome removal even after that just to get to the tappet covers. Consider this when you think how much your mechanic charges per hour to do this job. Its not a quick job. It can't possibly cheap. Maybe someone could tell me though.

Even with the chrome covers removed, and one ignition coil, each cylinder has its own side cover for the cam to be removed allowing for a particular dot to be aligned to a point on the head. This dot moving when the engine turns through yet two more covers removed to being this into position. This having to line up and corresponding to the correct marking on the crank through the inspection hole, depending on the cylinder.

The final test of this alignment is the wiggling of the tappet, there should be audible play as whey wiggle ever so slightly up and down. If not, you either messed up, or they are really in a bad way. Confirming this, and as luck would have it, three of my four were on the outer limits of acceptability. This means they were good. But I like them in the middle. So, adjust them I did. This involved the usual technique with a feeler gauge, a hex key and a box wrench. Lock nut is 10 ft/lbs

Satisfied with the new clearance, I clean the tappet cover, mating surface and put the cover back on. No need to keep it off and risk contamination. The screws are 7 ft/lbs. On the exhaust values, paper towel should be used under them before opening as some oil will leak out. This is especially true for the front exhaust value. The measurement is one value less than the first gauge that doesn't fit.

INTAKE .004in .102mm
EXHAUST .006in .150mm

Finishing the front cylinder tappets brings an end to part one. Part two continues with the rear cylinder and reassembly.

Part 1 of 2



We continue here with the inspection and adjustment of the valve lash on a Star 650, also known as a Vstar 650 or Dragstar 650, depending on where you live. Having just finished the front exhaust value, the inspection cover for the cam is closed after both the cover and mating surfaces are cleaned and the O ring inspected. This, as well, torques to 7.5 ft/lbs.

The process would then continue to the rear cylinder again having to remove the cam cover for the rear and rotate the engine, this time to the TI mark. On this side, one can see the dot on the cam as the engine is rotated making it somewhat easier. Aside from this, the adjustment on the valves for the rear remains identical if not slightly easier on the exhaust side than that of the front.

Having completed the rear adjustment, all chrome pieces are first washed with dish detergent and then using windex and chrome polish, dressed to a shine. Before installing them however, the spark plugs have miles of room for installation and should be added first. Make sure as the covers are installed that the pretty hex screws are used on the top covers; don't make the same mistake I did.

With all of the covers back on, be sure to re-add the hose clip for the breather, and then remount the rear ignition coil. A final cleaning to remove fingerprints removes all work evidence. A successful job awaiting a carb reinstallation.

Part 2 of 2
KCW, Boots, JonMaz2112 and 1 others like this.

CVM CATAPVLTAE PROSCRIPTAE ERVNT TVM SOLI PROSCRIPTI CATAPVLTAS HABEBVNT
http://technocoma.blogspot.com
https://www.youtube.com/c/jordanrubin6502

Last edited by jcrubin; 05-10-2019 at 07:21 AM.
jcrubin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019, 08:17 AM
KCW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 5,068
Garage
Overall the video is nicely done.

There is a website with step by step instructions that details a shorter (quicker) way to do the valves.

You appear to have taken more things off the engine than you need to for a valve adjustment. It is not necessary to take the carbs completely off the bike, you only need to take off the bolts to the intake boots, a couple wires and maybe the choke cable, then you can lift the carbs out of the way - no need to mess with the throttle cable, I think the fuel line stays connected. If you have the carbs off for another reason that is a different situation. I dont remember needing to take the coil off the frame and moving it.

If you understand how the valves move, when you are on top dead center neither valve is pushed in then you do not need to take the top cam covers off to see the cam timing mark. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the right timing mark lines up on the crank shaft, and watch the valves at the same time. If they are moving as you come up on TDC, you are between the exhaust and intake stroke, not on the compression stroke, and need to go around another 360.

If someone is doing this for the first time I would suggest they take off the rear cylinder cam cover (its easier to remove) and see how the mark on the crank shaft matches the mark on the cam shaft on every other rotation and how the valves are moving on the 'wrong' TDC, and then they wont need to take the front cam cover off, or either the next time they do the valves.

Its not only more work to take off those top covers, they also have O rings.

Its at least 2 hours to get to the tappet covers on the intake side. If you do not replace the o rings you risk having them leak, and then its two more hours to tear it all down and replace those two inside o rings. At $4 each its not worth the risk. You can re-use o rings if they are fairly new, and you can put a new one one, take the cover off, put it on, take it off... several times and it will reseal (unlike a gasket). But if you re-use an old o ring it may be too deformed over time to re-seal. If you also took off the upper cam covers I would replace those o rings too, because you cannot get to them with the engine assembled.

The rear exhaust tappet cover can be removed with the bike fully assembled. If you slightly modify (or leave off) the fake plastic valve covers you can get to the front exhaust valve too.

There is an obvious mistake in the video, you say to turn the engine over clockwise but you are turning it over the other way. The engine in (I think all) Vstar bikes spins in the opposite direction as the front wheel. This is unusual - most V twins spin the same direction as the front wheel. If you have worked on a lot of Vtwin engines the mistake in the video is understandable, because they all spin CCW, just like all bolts are right handed threads, except when they are not.

By turning the engine over CCW as you did in the video, you are pulling the cam chains from the tensioner side, which will pull the tensioner tight and allow the chain to go slack on the other side. You never want your engine to be spinning backwards with overhead cams, you could pull the timing off far enough to have the pistons touch a valve (while its turning backwards).

This is even more important if you take the shortcut and only use the timing mark on the crankshaft to find TDC, because you want to approach it from the right side, so the timing chain is tight and the cam will be in the right place relative to the timing mark on the crankshaft.

Again overall its well done and there are no serious mistakes, but you might consider addressing the CW rotation and the orings in the comments on your Utube page.

EDIT: one thing I caught in the audio, to adjust the valve clearance the bike needs to sit overnight (or 12 hours) so the engine is at a uniform room temperature. You cannot properly adjust the clearance if the engine is warm from being run, dont even start up the bike to ride it 20 feet into the garage. This needs to be stated.

The specs for clearance in the manual are for a cold engine - there are no specs for a warm or hot engine. The reason is, as the motor runs the valves and parts in the cylinder heat up and expand at different rates. You may notice when you run your engine the tappets will sound louder sometimes when its cold or very hot. It does not matter if the garage is 30F or 100F, the important thing is the engine has sat for 12 hours and its all at the same temperature.
Boots and JonMaz2112 like this.

Last edited by KCW; 05-06-2019 at 11:51 AM.
KCW is offline  
post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019, 08:42 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
jcrubin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Clermont, FL
Posts: 39
Garage
Greetings, your analysis/s are always welcome and appreciated... I respond within.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KCW View Post
Overall the video is nicely done.Thanks

There is a website with step by step instructions that details a shorter (quicker) way to do the valves.
Shorter quicker, perhaps, I did not state, shortest quickest method, but a running example of the official procedure as cited by Yamaha for this bike. I refer to this answer as 1A


You appear to have taken more things off the engine than you need to for a valve adjustment. It is not necessary to take the carbs completely off the bike, you only need to take off the bolts to the intake boots, a couple wires and maybe the choke cable, then you can lift the carbs out of the way - no need to mess with the throttle cable, I think the fuel line stays connected. If you have the carbs off for another reason that is a different situation. I dont remember needing to take the coil off the frame and moving it.
Again Answer 1A


If you understand how the valves move, when you are on top dead center neither valve is pushed in then you do not need to take the top cam covers off to see the cam timing mark. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the right timing mark lines up on the crank shaft, and watch the valves at the same time. If they are moving as you come up on TDC, you are between the exhaust and intake stroke, not on the compression stroke, and need to go around another 360.

If someone is doing this for the first time I would suggest they take off the rear cylinder cam cover (its easier to remove) and see how the mark on the crank shaft matches the mark on the cam shaft on every other rotation and how the valves are moving on the 'wrong' TDC, and then they wont need to take the front cam cover off, or either the next time they do the valves.

Its not only more work to take off those top covers, they also have O rings.
Again Answer 1A

Its at least 2 hours to get to the tappet covers on the intake side. If you do not replace the o rings you risk having them leak, and then its two more hours to tear it all down and replace those two inside o rings. At $4 each its not worth the risk. You can re-use o rings if they are fairly new, and you can put a new one one, take the cover off, put it on, take it off... several times and it will reseal (unlike a gasket). But if you re-use an old o ring it may be too deformed over time to re-seal. If you also took off the upper cam covers I would replace those o rings too, because you cannot get to them with the engine assembled.

Ill point out along with Answer 1A, this is a 10 minute affair at most not 2 hours

The rear exhaust tappet cover can be removed with the bike fully assembled. If you slightly modify (or leave off) the fake plastic valve covers you can get to the front exhaust valve too.
Yes, If you had the hankering to just do the rear exhaust valve, only the plastic log box need be removed


There is an obvious mistake in the video, you say to turn the engine over clockwise but you are turning it over the other way. The engine in (I think all) Vstar bikes spins in the opposite direction as the front wheel. This is unusual - most V twins spin the same direction as the front wheel. If you have worked on a lot of Vtwin engines the mistake in the video is understandable, because they all spin CCW, just like all bolts are right handed threads, except when they are not.

By turning the engine over CCW as you did in the video, you are pulling the cam chains from the tensioner side, which will pull the tensioner tight and allow the chain to go slack on the other side. You never want your engine to be spinning backwards with overhead cams, you could pull the timing off far enough to have the pistons touch a valve (while its turning backwards).

This is even more important if you take the shortcut and only use the timing mark on the crankshaft to find TDC, because you want to approach it from the right side, so the timing chain is tight and the cam will be in the right place relative to the timing mark on the crankshaft.

Dead to rights.... and though its called off in the intended manner and then turned otherwise I didn't think it so obvious to re-record that portion, you really need to be looking to see that. I had to run past the mark and come back to the point in the correct direction for good measure.


Again overall its well done and there are no serious mistakes, but you might consider addressing the CW rotation and the orings in the comments on your Utube page.

EDIT: one thing I caught in the audio, to adjust the valve clearance the bike needs to sit overnight (or 12 hours) so the engine is at a uniform room temperature. You cannot properly adjust the clearance if the engine is warm from being run, dont even start up the bike to ride it 20 feet into the garage. This needs to be stated.

The specs for clearance in the manual are for a cold engine - there are no specs for a warm or hot engine. The reason is, as the motor runs the valves and parts in the cylinder heat up and expand at different rates. You may notice when you run your engine the tappets will sound louder sometimes when its cold or very hot. It does not matter if the garage is 30F or 100F, the important thing is the engine has sat for 12 hours and its all at the same temperature.
I told myself 19 times I would mention this and then.... yeah lovely..... into the comment section it will go.
lesblank, KCW and JonMaz2112 like this.

CVM CATAPVLTAE PROSCRIPTAE ERVNT TVM SOLI PROSCRIPTI CATAPVLTAS HABEBVNT
http://technocoma.blogspot.com
https://www.youtube.com/c/jordanrubin6502
jcrubin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-07-2019, 08:22 AM
KCW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 5,068
Garage
Quote:
this is a 10 minute affair at most not 2 hours
I think we are missing each other on the tappet cover o rings on the intake valves.

If you adjust the valves and put the bike all back together (gas tank, seats) and then start it up, take a ride, and find an intake tappet cover oring is oozing/leaking oil, you have to tear it all back down just as if you were going to check and adjust the intake valve clearance again - there is no shortcut to get that tappet cover off with the carbs on the bike. If there was then adjusting the intake valves would be a 10 minute job - its not, its about 2 hours if you have done it before.

that is where the $8 for two inside orings vs 2 hours to do it over is a simple choice

the exhaust tappet covers are not as bad, you can get the rear one with a box wrench, and you can modify the front plastic cover so its like the rear one then that one is easy too. Replacing one of those after it was found leaking would be a 10 minute job.

Going back to the first few points, the factory service manual tends to simplify the manual at the expense of making specific tasks more complicated than necessary - for valve adjustment it points to the section on "remove the carbs" - its the same procedure the manual points to for removing the carbs for any reason.

The valve adjustment is scheduled for every 8000 miles. These are 100,000 mile machines, so that is 12 valve adjustment jobs over the life of the bike if you stick to the schedule. After a while the short cuts really pay off, esp things like not taking off the top cam covers and replacing those two extra o rings everytime. If someone had never adjusted valves before I would stick to the manual and do it as you describe, the first time for sure, so that everything is clear and there can be no confusion.

Your video is very useful. When I have to do something for the first time I always hit up youtube to get an idea what Im getting myself into. After a person has done the job once or twice they will find the shortcuts and money saving or time saving, or Oops saving things to look for.
lesblank and JonMaz2112 like this.

Last edited by KCW; 05-07-2019 at 09:45 AM.
KCW is offline  
post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-07-2019, 09:08 AM
Member
 
DukeHam's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Canada
Posts: 39
Garage
Thanks for taking the time to make and post the video, much appreciated.
DukeHam is offline  
post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-07-2019, 09:43 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
jcrubin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Clermont, FL
Posts: 39
Garage
Response added within quotes............................->


Quote:
Originally Posted by KCW View Post
I think we are missing each other on the tappet cover o rings on the intake valves.

If you adjust the valves and put the bike all back together (gas tank, seats) and then start it up, take a ride, and find an intake tappet cover oring is oozing/leaking oil, you have to tear it all back down just as if you were going to check and adjust the intake valve clearance again - there is no shortcut to get that tappet cover off with the carbs on the bike. If there was then adjusting the intake valves would be a 10 minute job - its not, its about 2 hours if you have done it before.

that is where the $8 for two inside orings vs 2 hours to do it over is a simple choice

the exhaust tappet covers are not as bad, you can get the rear one with a box wrench, and you can modify the front plastic cover so its like the rear one then that one is easy too. Replacing one of those after it was found leaking would be a 10 minute job.

I missed the point you were making on this but yes, that a failure along any point in this job on the intakes would lead to a re-breaking down of the assembled items would be reproducing all of the efforts again. This would include the tappet cover seals. That said, Ive only ever seen them fail from over/under tightening conditions that warp the cover or strip out the screw. A weeping seal, would be on a really old, never addressed unit at this point id imagine.


Going back to the first few points, the factory service manual tends to simplify the manual at the expense of making specific tasks more complicated than necessary - for valve adjustment it points to the section on "remove the carbs" - its the same procedure the manual points to for removing the carbs for any reason.

The valve adjustment is scheduled for every 8000 miles. These are 100,000 mile machines, so that is 12 valve adjustment jobs over the life of the bike if you stick to the schedule. After a while the short cuts really pay off, esp things like not taking off the top cam covers and replacing those two extra o rings everytime. If someone had never adjusted valves before I would stick to the manual and do it as you describe, the first time for sure, so that everything is clear and there can be no confusion.
NO sir. So long as we are still on publication YAM-E8301000 and EAU00471 , valve inspection would be ~4000mi , give or take, maybe this changed lately in the last few years?? but not for most of the 650's on the road.


Your video is very useful. When I have to do something for the first time I always hit up youtube to get an idea what Im getting myself into. After a person has done the job once or twice they will find the shortcuts and money saving or time saving, or Oops saving things to look for.

CVM CATAPVLTAE PROSCRIPTAE ERVNT TVM SOLI PROSCRIPTI CATAPVLTAS HABEBVNT
http://technocoma.blogspot.com
https://www.youtube.com/c/jordanrubin6502
jcrubin is offline  
post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 05-10-2019, 07:21 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
jcrubin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Clermont, FL
Posts: 39
Garage
Part 2 has been added to the original post.
lesblank and JonMaz2112 like this.

CVM CATAPVLTAE PROSCRIPTAE ERVNT TVM SOLI PROSCRIPTI CATAPVLTAS HABEBVNT
http://technocoma.blogspot.com
https://www.youtube.com/c/jordanrubin6502
jcrubin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
650 classic valve adjustment road_slug V Star 19 02-10-2018 09:42 PM
Valve adjustment on V Star 950 YamaMassGirl Engine Work 11 03-30-2017 12:12 PM
Tackled: Valve Adjustment (650 Classic) Chuckster V Star 2 09-29-2013 06:32 AM
Valve Adjustment...How Important??? DCrider V Star 28 04-17-2012 01:13 PM
Valve adjustment questions JaBo General Bike Talk 2 05-17-2010 08:52 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome