Electrical issue - any experience? - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-08-2014, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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Electrical issue - any experience?

I'm in the process of trying to get my V-Star 650 to run smoothly after being parked several months (I usually ride often enough that winterizing is unnecessary - this year my failure to winterize bit me). While running the bike with the tank off, I noticed that the larger (3-connector fitting) of the two connectors from the stator was hot. VERY hot. As in: both the male and female plastic connectors melted and the metal connections began to short. Obviously something is wrong in the electrical system - most likely a short somewhere - and now I have to try to find it. My first suspicion is the stator and the regulator/rectifier, since those are the two parts closest in line with the fitting. I did a quick continuity/resistance test on the stator and it seems okay. I haven't thoroughly tested the regulator yet, but a quick voltage test at the battery seems within specs. Before I continue testing on these, and start walking through the electrical system in general, I was wondering if anyone on this forum might have any particular experience with this issue, or expertise with the electrical system to be able to pinpoint likely problem areas. I appreciate any input.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-08-2014, 07:59 PM
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If the connectors are hot, and the wire some distance away isn't, you have resistance in the connectors. The three connector fitting is usually the one carrying the current. I don't know your bike specifically. Usually all three of the wires will be the same color, and it won't really make any difference which wire is connected where. I'd pull the connectors apart, pull the metal parts out of the connectors (if possible) and make sure the metal connectors are crimped solidly onto the wires. It would be electrically best to solder the wires together, but that will make future maintenance more difficult.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 07:20 AM
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"It would be electrically best to solder the wires together,"

Not wanting to be argumentative, but in high vibration environments, crimping is better due to the stress cracking of a solder joint. All connections in airplanes are crimped for that reason.

larry
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larrym View Post
"It would be electrically best to solder the wires together,"

Not wanting to be argumentative, but in high vibration environments, crimping is better due to the stress cracking of a solder joint. All connections in airplanes are crimped for that reason.

larry
Crimping is widely used in industrial environments such as aircraft because it is more quickly done than soldering, and doesn't present the risks of high temperatures. But going further back, the crimp connectors were originally developed in response to OSHA regulations concerning lead exposure to workers. It was easier and more cost effective to develop the crimping system than to retrofit factories to remove lead fumes from soldering. As it turned out, a properly crimped connection is as good as, or better than, a soldered connection.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 08:38 AM
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I notice I am the only one to actually respond to the original poster's problem, which is a high-resistance connection. If you guys would like, I can quit posting altogether.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 09:56 AM
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"Hubris," huh? My, I am impressed. I would have never aspired to such a lofty description. And feel free to oppose me, even though your post still didn't address the problem of the OP.

Now, if the problem had appeared on my bike, I would have first looked to see whether there was enough wire in the harness to let me make repairs without having to splice in additional length. Given the original description that the connector was melted, I would mark the wires so as to be able to reconnect them in original configuration, even though in this case it probably wouldn't matter. I would then have cut out the connector and stripped the wires back to where there would be no melted plastic in the conductors. Then I'd use butt crimp connectors to repair them. The drawback is, should the stator ever have to be replaced, the easy connector would be gone and I'd have to cut and resplice wires. Troubleshooting would also be more difficult for the same reason.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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Nailed it!

Yep, the high-resistance connection was the issue. I pulled the spade connectors out of the plastic housings, and while I couldn't see any loose connections I took a gamble and cut off the spade fittings, stripped the wires and reconnected them with wire nuts (temporary for testing, only). I ran the bike in the garage, same as when I first noticed the heat, and no abnormal heat was generated. Now I just need to replace the connector - I'd like to find the same style of 3-wire connector if I can (any suggestions?), but I suppose a different 3-wire connector or even bullet connections would do the job - and would only be an issue if the stator needs to be replaced in the future. Thanks for your help!
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 07:03 PM
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This site has all kinds of OEM type connectors.

http://www.easternbeaver.com/Main/main.html

Here is one more site. This one only has a $5 minimum order.

http://www.cycleterminal.com/index.html

BLUE BIKE CLUB

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My ride videos. http://www.youtube.com/user/roadstarblue/videos

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Last edited by blueroadstar; 03-09-2014 at 07:05 PM.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-09-2014, 08:37 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, blueroadstar. I found and ordered the proper replacement.
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