How many women Roadstar owners are here? - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
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How many women Roadstar owners are here?

Hello all. 🙂
I might be moving up from my 1998 Honda Shadow 750 ACE into my husband's 2007 Roadstar 1700. Not gonna lie, at only 5'2", I am a little nervous about the transition. Just curious how many other women or riders of smaller stature are here that own this bike.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 11:38 PM
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Welcome. I'm not small or a female but hope it all works out. If you've been riding already you should do fine. Stay safe.

For mad scientists who keep brains in jars, here’s a tip: why not add a slice of lemon to each jar, for freshness?
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-19-2018, 11:59 PM
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Don't sell your Honda right away....lol.

1999 V-Star 650 Classic
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 12:52 AM
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Welcome from Houston, Texas. I'm sure with some time you will be comfortable on it. I'm 5'6" and at first my 1100 felt big, but not anymore. Ride often and safe.

2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), Cobra Slash Cut full exhaust, Dropped 1 inch with lowering links, ORK, 4.5 inch handlebar risers, Ultimate passenger seat, Passenger pegs moved forward 4 inches, Handlebar clock, KN air filter, Viking saddlebags, Additional rear lighting
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 05:33 AM Thread Starter
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Little bit more history...
I've had my Honda for about 3 years now and have put about 6,000 miles on her. I love the bike... she's beautiful, but since we live in the country, most of our riding is highway. After about an hour or so, I start to get uncomfortable. I've ridden the RoadStar once so far. We brought it to a parking lot, so I could do some slow speed maneuvers. I felt totally comfortable on it. It handles better than my Honda and seems better balanced. I can also flat foot better. My only concern with riding it full-time is getting into a jam where I might have to use body strength to move it. I.e., backing it up a hill, on gravel, etc.
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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 05:34 AM Thread Starter
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Howdy, fellow northerner. I am from the Duluth area.
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethany1972 View Post
Howdy, fellow northerner. I am from the Duluth area.
Awesome part of the world. Hope to make Duluth one of my trips this summer. You might consider taking the advanced rider course.

MN Advanced Rider Course $75
Course Information
If you want razor sharp hazard avoidance riding skills, try the 8-hour MN Advanced Rider Course where you'll hone the skills you need to avoid the dangers of the road, such as other drivers, deer and debris.

Being able to complete a 28-foot U-turn on your motorcycle is a requirement to take this course. Groups or clubs may purchase an entire Advanced Rider Course for only $500. Riders use their own motorcycles for this course.

The minimum engine size for this course is 400cc.

View schedule and register for a course at:
•Roseau training site
•Virginia training site

This course uses the same techniques designed to train and keep police motor officers safe in any riding or traffic situation. Riders provide their own bikes. Video is available for some of the course exercises by clicking on the links provided.

https://dps.mn.gov/divisions/ots/mms...er-course.aspx

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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 01:36 PM
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I don't think it so much a matter of being a woman, as it is having a bike that is the right size for you. I see people riding sports bikes, stopping at red lights touching the ground with the tippy toes of their sneakers - its only a matter of time before they will drop their bike.

If you have been well trained you already know a motorcycle is self balancing. When you get over 20 mph you are not actively balancing the bike, you are steering it. If you know how to countersteer it does not take any brute force or 'man-handling' to get the bike where you want it to go, or to brake the bike as necessary.

It sounds like you are already aware of the issues of riding slow, being able to put a foot down (or both) flat footed with a little bend in your knees to spare.

The things you need to watch out for are still the same as anyone else. They did not talk about these things in the beginners MSF riding course, I discovered a few myself:

1. Don't ever try to make a U turn on a hill, not going up or down. When you get halfway thru the U turn, part of the pavement on one side of the bike will be higher, and the other side will be lower. Because you are turning on a hill the bike will speed up and slow down, and its nothing like you are use to on a level surface. Then when you need to put your feet down, one foot will find nothing but air, and over you go! This is true for all riders, no matter how tall you are or how big your bike is.

2. Its a similar situation when you stop on the shoulder of the road - some shoulders can be sloped quite a bit, and some slope the wrong way (towards the street). You want to stop on the edge of the lane, and then turn your bike so its parked nearly perpendicular to the curb (pointed to the street). If you park it straight like a car, then whichever way the shoulder is sloping it bike will not sit on the kick stand or center stand properly.

3. If you are going up or down an hill, and for any reason the road is blocked and you cannot get thru, then you have the problem from #1 above. If you can pull into a driveway or side street, find a level section and do a U turn you are OK. But you have to be aware of this before it happens. If you are going down a steep hill and its blocked at the bottom, like a flood across a bridge, then you cannot walk your bike back up the hill backwards. The best thing in that situation is to stop your bike, secure it on the kickstand, and get someone to help you turn it around, one person on the high and low sides of the bike.

The other thing I would recommend for anyone riding a big bike, and for anyone that is just learning to ride is: never stand on one side of your bike and push it around by the handgrips. If you only have to move it a few feet, sit on the bike, put the kick stand up, and duck walk it. If you need to move it further start it up, you can still duck walk it if you need to go really slow (like across a lawn).

If you are standing on one side and it leans over the other way just a little bit, you cannot possibly pull it back up, esp with a big bike - you need one foot one each side.

Other than going slow and getting stuck on a hill, riding a motorcycle is like driving a car. There is no such thing as a car that is too big for a short / petite person to drive, as long as you can reach the pedals.

Last edited by KCW; 05-20-2018 at 01:41 PM.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 02:23 PM
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I've known a couple women who ride Roadstars without any significant problems. One was about 5'6" and the other a bit taller. I'm not aware of any currently on this forum, but it doesn't mean there aren't any here. Great, comfortable bike once you get it moving. You'll just need to be a bit more selective/strategic when parking so you don't have to muscle it around. You already know this since you've ridden your husband's Roadstar. If the bike is a bit too tall, it's easy to lower the bike with a couple available options. The only negative in lowering the bike is scraping the floorboards a bit more when cornering. I own two roadstars with one of them lowered. I scrape all the time, but really no big deal. Good Luck!
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-20-2018, 02:47 PM
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If the bike is setup for you ..ride height etc than the size of the bike should not be an issue at all. I have friends on 1300's and there about your height at 5'2" and i know people with lowered roadliners than are vertically challenged. If it's setup for you to ride than I don't see an issue. My ex is on a stratoliner but she is also 6'2" .
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