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Discussion Starter #1
I got a rear flat on my 650 today, Friday the 13th. However, I was 1/4 mile from the dealer and thought I was a lucky fella.. Got the bike to them and they said "We don't fix flat's" I said, well who does.. the answer was nobody... So I have a relatively new tire that is just done because of a flat? AND to top it off, replacement is $350 tire+labor

This is my very first flat ever on a bike. They had me over a barrel so to speak since they are the only motorcycle shop in town but I just wanted to know... Is this true? You don't fix a cycle flat, you just replace the tire?
 

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Both the motorcycle makers and the tire makers will tell you the tire should be replaced. That is the official line. The usual caveat is to follow the official line, for your own safety. The shop will refuse to repair the tire for reasons of liability and insurance. Don't count on buying a tire off the Internet and having them install it, either, as many shops refuse to install a tire they didn't sell.
 

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Thanks Charon, I was stuck paying it anyway as I had no other choice. They had just one tire brand and just one in my size and they are the only motorcycle shop so they have me. I just wanted to know if they were actually screwing me or just kind of screwing me.. Thanks again!
 

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Motorcycle tire repairs are really only to get you to a shop to install a new tire.

I'm thinking the price seems high but I hate buying tires. So what do I know?
 

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Out of curiosity, does your bike have tubeless or tube-type tires? If tube-type, I personally would have found and removed whatever had made the tire go flat (probably a nail) and just replaced the tube. That's what I do on my own bikes. It still calls for removing the wheel and tire, and is a good bit of work.
 

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Right, don't you have tubes? Spoked wheels should just need the tube replaced. Unless of course there was some gapping hole or rip in the actual tire. Was there any indication of what made it flat? Did you see a hole in anything?
Yup, motorcycle tire replacement is a racket. The dealer where I bought my 650 new doesn't even carry the tires for my bike, go figure. Not to mention they are so busy same day service would be a pipe dream. I tried to get an appt once and it was a full month out. Been going to the Honda dealer instead, faster service and cheaper labor rates. $60 per tire change instead of $100. Buy the tires online and bring them in, tubes too.

$350 for one tire and labor is very, very high. What tire did they put on it anyway? The most expensive one they could dig up?
 

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Beware of the nay-sayers. They will cost you money. 3 flats here. Two of them I plugged myself. Never had a problem on the combined 32K I logged on those repaired tires. . I'm fully confident riding on a plugged tire. ....because I have done it several times. The other tire I killed was so worn I replaced it...in my garage...with my handy-dandy HF tire changer.

Dont believe everything you read on a forum. The rich guys will tell you "throw money at it, it'll go away".

The money-less (like me) will tell you what I just told you. And my story is 100% true.

Choice is yours.

I guarantee there will be a crap storm from the yuppies here, but what I just said is absolutely true.

I wont respond to any of it because I have performed what I have preached.

But...its very cool that your tire decided to fail that close to a dealer !

Many thanks,

jb
 

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Beware of the nay-sayers. They will cost you money. 3 flats here. Two of them I plugged myself. Never had a problem on the combined 32K I logged on those repaired tires.

i think what most of us are saying is that dealers and bike shops, the vast majority of them, will not fix a motorcycle tire for all the reasons stated. not that it can't be done.
 

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I always carry a plug kit, so far I've been lucky as to only stop to fix a strangers bike tire. I wouldn't hesitate to ride on a plugged tire, but not aggressively and only as far as I needed to get a new tire.

I went so, "Yuppie" this year I bought a mini compressor and replaced my CO2 cartridges. I really wanted it for home so I don't have to ride to a gas station, pay the $1 (yeah only $1) to air a low tire. My garage floor is clean and those gas station lots are not worthy of a yuppie to be on. I actually have to lay on the ground to get the chuck onto my rear tire under the saddlebags and around the discs. None of this applies if you never check the tire pressure. I'm not sure I even know any yuppies ???? I thought everyone went Hipster ???

Don
 

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Regardless of one's stance on repair vs. replace, they definitely turned the screws to you. I bought a used bike and had a long weekend with no work to ride it, but the rear was terribly cupped and had a flat spot. I paid almost $250 for a tire and installation because they had a tire, I wanted to ride, and I didn't want to spend hours working on a tire so I could feel superior. I felt like that was pretty high.

When that tire wore out, I found myself another local shop. They sourced me a rear Commander II and installed it for $180. I don't plan on ever going to that first shop again. If a shop ever charged me $350, I'd probably be pissed enough to learn how to change my own!

Either way, that's a rough situation. It sucks that you have no other options.
 

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If you have a tube-type tire, you pretty much have to remove the tire and tube to find the problem. When I got the nail in the rear on my KLR650, the tire came unseated from the bead of the wheel, and tore the valve stem out of the tube. No repairing that one - new tube. My 250 Star didn't do that, but the nail caused a crescent-shaped hole about the size of a dime in the tube. In any case, tubes only cost about $15 or so and for that I just replace them. You will either have to do it yourself (no fun at all) or pay shop rates to have it done. Around here, it is less expensive if you take the wheel to the dealer, more if you take the bike because you pay labor for them to remove the wheel.

For tubeless tires, the cheapest option is probably a can of some variety of Fix-A-Flat. Make sure to see whether you can get the can and/or its adapter hose onto the valve stem BEFORE you need it. Be aware that stuff stays liquid in the tire, may cause balance problems, and makes a God-awful mess for the next guy who has to remove the tire. You could use some sort of externally inserted plug; or remove the tire and apply an internal patch; or even (if the tire is suitable) install an inner tube. Remember the official party line about the inadvisability of repairing motorcycle tires and decide for yourself. If you ride solo, you are only risking your own butt. If you carry your Significant Other, they also have "skin in the game."
 

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The first ever flat we had on our bike, I WOULD NOT fix. Have been an auto tech for 20 years. I consider motorcycle tires on par with "Z" rated car tires...also not recommended to be plugged or patched ( for regular auto tires I prefer a one piece "plug-patch", considered a permanent repair) Expensive? Absolutely. But "fixing" a tire can damage the integrity. I would ONLY plug a tire in case of emergency, either to get home or to a shop. Rope type plugs should not be considered a permanent repair. I know of people that have plugged their motorcycle tires, and they've been fine. I just prefer not to. And I will not EVER use Fix a Flat, Slime or any other sealant. They just do not work, and oh yes it's a mess when you take a tire off and get covered in the nasty stuff.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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There's always tire insurance, too. Not a warranty. Tire insurance. I never thought I'd use it until I got a flat last year and realized the cost of the tire was more than I paid for the insurance. If you can find it, great. Mine was offered at purchase and I really thought it was just dealer fluff at the time. Probably is, but I know the replacement tire cost me exactly squat except for the $50 labor charge. And the tire installed is covered, too, because it's not a warranty, it's a five year insurance policy.
 
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