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Hi there, looking for some help on maintenance I should perform on a bike. I'm getting my father in-laws xv1600 that has been sitting for over 4 years. It's a 2001 with just over 12k on it and always garage kept. I know the oil needs to be changed, gas flushed out, carb cleaned, new plugs, and maybe brake pads.
What didn't know was about the tires and belt. I think the tires are original but even if they aren't, do they "expire "? Still holding air and no signs of cracks, so should I replace them to be safe? Also, what should I look for on the belt? Is there a wear indicator or are they a drive until they break item?
I'm new to street bikes but have ridden dirt bikes since I was a kid which was back in the late 1900s haha.

Thanks for your help and input!
 

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yup. mine 2006 sat in my garage for 12 years. original belt still holding out. some derusting of the tank is worthwhile. flush brake fluids. might want to replace fuel filter. maybe go pumpless, while carb is open.
 

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The tires do expire, the belt should be good,just clean it with soap and water " no belt dressing" that picks up road grime and kills a belt. I don't know where you live , but here in Pensacola if it is damp it hit the chrome around the speedo about three times with open palm. If not the speedo and gas gauge want to act funny. The 1600 has a weak starter solenoid, they last about a year then they start needing several clicks on the starter button before they hit. They are cheap and you can get them on Amazon.
Run seafoam , about 1 ounce a gallon a couple times a year and you will never have carb problems. Use the choke everytime you start it, it's a big motor and will start everytime if you do it.
I ride a 1600 everyday ( unless it's pouring) the bike has the exact feel of an old Harley Heritage, great in town and a sweet spot of around 75 mph on the highway. 3 rd gear is great in town 4th on long stretches.
Enjoy the ride , your going to love it.
 

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Use OEM Yamaha carb parts, chinese junk is just that....junk.
My Roadie has a bit over 80K on an original belt, I've put the last 40K on it myself.
Keep it clean and properly adjusted and it will last nearly forever.
Get rid of the tires, they're much less expensive than a crash.
Buy an extra starter solenoid, the old one will give out at the most inconvenient time, having one on hand keeps you riding. They're easy to change.
Keep an eye on the front pulley nut, they'll get loose.
Call Yamaha with your VIN# and find out if the oil pump and transmission updates were done.
Get a manual, they can be found online for free
if you look adround.

Early Roadies are one of the most durable and reliable bikes ever made.
 

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As mentioned, new tires if they're the original. There should be a 4 digit code on the tire to indicate date of manufacture. First two are the week of the year, the following two are year. So 0215 would be the second week of 2015 for example.

New fluids for sure. Brake, engine oil, and transfer case. These bikes are known for longevity and many have easily passed 100K miles with just the basic maintenance.

These are probably one of the easier bikes to work on as well. So if you need help with something just reach out here and someone is sure to be able to lend some assistance.
 

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Yep, as others have mentioned, rubber ages out with time. With a motorcycle only having 2 tiny contact patches keeping you out of the hospital or morgue, I tend to err on the side of caution here with my customers. With my own bikes, I can tell when it's time to dump them. They will harden with age, and hard tires don't grip like they should. If I get a slide just once on dry pavement, they're gone the second I get home. For customers I recommend no more than 6 years. The Northeast is pretty forgiving, since these machines normally sit for 3-6 months every year, we don't hardly have excessively high temperatures in the summer, and UV is less intense here, so we can run tires almost double what the guys out in the Southwest or down South run them. I have run 30 year old OE rubber on my XL350R, though I'd NEVER send a customer out like that.

The 2 tire killers that will accelerate the aging process are UV, ozone, and heat, in order of the worst to the "less worst". UV and heat together kills them quick. And like someone already mentioned, check the date code. Keep in mind that 4-digit code is only on ONE side of the tire, next to the acronym, "DOT".
 
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