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Discussion Starter #1
I just finished my 21" Harley conversion today. I'm loving the new look.
I went a different route than the write up on the wiki knowledge page and did a bearing swap, so I was able to retain the stock axle shaft and can go back and forth between Harley or Vstar front wheels. I can do a write up on it if there is interest




 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks Great!
Please do a write up ...
Details- details please
Here's a write-up for how I did it. If you have any pointers or questions on what I did or how to spruce up the write-up let me know.

***Here's a way to do a Harley front wheel conversion that allows you to retain you stock 17mm axle shaft, thus allowing you to go back and forth between Harley front wheels and Vstar 1100 front wheels. Total cost on this conversion was about $160 total.

What you'll need:
-2000+ Harley softail front wheel of your choosing
- 2 - 62304/17 AB Bearing 17x52x21 Sealed bearings from VXB.com
- 1 - 5" long steel tube with a 18mm inner diameter and a decent wall thickness (for crush sleeve).
-1 single 18" long brake line of your choice(if going single front brake).

Firstly,
I was able to find a 2007 Harley softail front wheel on a tire with the 11.5" rotor for $100 off Craigslist. I then pulled out the stock bearings that were in the wheel. They're pressed in so you'll need to have them pulled out at a motorcycle shop or get a bearing puller. You can find a cheap inner bearing slide hammer puller off eBay for about $40. Once you have the old bearings out, Next you'll install the bearings and crush sleeve. You can take this to your local bike shop and have it done or do what I did and save some money if you have the ability. You'll press in the left side bearing until it seats all the way in the wheel. To do this I used 2 small scrap 1/4" thick small steel plates I had and a c-clamp to do this. I stood the wheel up on a table and put one steel plate against the right side hub and the other against the face of the bearing I was pressing into on the left side. The steel plates allow you to clamp down and press in the bearing with even pressure across the whole bearing face and gives you an area to put the c-clamp faces on securely for clamping. Once the left side bearing is in, you'll take the 5" long steel tube mentioned above and put it in the center of the hub. This will be used as a crush sleeve so when you tighten the axle in the fork you don't over tighten and squeeze the inner races on the bearings and cause premature bearing failure. Next install the right side bearing. Now for this it's a little more tricky. I set the right side bearing in the hub and put the axle through the bearing and crush sleeve solely to hold the crush sleeve in place in the center of the hub. Then put a steel plate on the left side hub to use as a clamping surface and then carefully used outside race of the bearing as my other clamp surface, slowly and carefully pressed it in(the bearings went I fairly easy and I didn't do any damage to the bearing but if you not comfortable doing this take it to your local bike shop and have them do it). You'll press the right side bearing in until just touches the crush sleeve and that's it. The slight pressure should hold the crush sleeve in place and you can pull out the axle. Next you can install the wheel on the bike just as you normally would but without the spacers. Once you're wheel is on, you can measure up what length spacers you'll need. I used the 2 factory Vstar 1100 spacers(and ordered replacements if I ever want to go back to the stock Vstar front wheel) and cut off roughly 1/3 of each spacer. Then reinstalled the wheel with the spacers and tightened everything down and that part is done. If you're running dual front brakes then you done and ready to go.

If you're going single front brake like I did, you'll need to pull off whatever side caliper you're not using(in my case he right side). And swap out the dual front brake line for the single 18" one mentioned above. After that you'll just need to refill and bleed the brakes and you're all done and ready to go.

Some extra goodies I went with that raised the cost for me slightly was I went with a stainless steel braided brake line about $35 of eBay. A standard rubber line is around $20. Also I went with a polished 11.5" Harley brake rotor which was about $65 off eBay. So my total cost for this conversion was about $225, but still beats the $800 plus for an aftermarket front wheel.***
 

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Looks Great!
Please do a write up ...
Details- details please
Here's a write-up for how I did it. If you have any pointers or questions on what I did or how to spruce up the write-up let me know.

***Here's a way to do a Harley front wheel conversion that allows you to retain you stock 17mm axle shaft, thus allowing you to go back and forth between Harley front wheels and Vstar 1100 front wheels. Total cost on this conversion was about $160 total.

What you'll need:
-2000+ Harley softail front wheel of your choosing
- 2 - 62304/17 AB Bearing 17x52x21 Sealed bearings from VXB.com
- 1 - 5" long steel tube with a 18mm inner diameter and a decent wall thickness (for crush sleeve).
-1 single 18" long brake line of your choice(if going single front brake).

Firstly,
I was able to find a 2007 Harley softail front wheel on a tire with the 11.5" rotor for $100 off Craigslist. I then pulled out the stock bearings that were in the wheel. They're pressed in so you'll need to have them pulled out at a motorcycle shop or get a bearing puller. You can find a cheap inner bearing slide hammer puller off eBay for about $40. Once you have the old bearings out, Next you'll install the bearings and crush sleeve. You can take this to your local bike shop and have it done or do what I did and save some money if you have the ability. You'll press in the left side bearing until it seats all the way in the wheel. To do this I used 2 small scrap 1/4" thick small steel plates I had and a c-clamp to do this. I stood the wheel up on a table and put one steel plate against the right side hub and the other against the face of the bearing I was pressing into on the left side. The steel plates allow you to clamp down and press in the bearing with even pressure across the whole bearing face and gives you an area to put the c-clamp faces on securely for clamping. Once the left side bearing is in, you'll take the 5" long steel tube mentioned above and put it in the center of the hub. This will be used as a crush sleeve so when you tighten the axle in the fork you don't over tighten and squeeze the inner races on the bearings and cause premature bearing failure. Next install the right side bearing. Now for this it's a little more tricky. I set the right side bearing in the hub and put the axle through the bearing and crush sleeve solely to hold the crush sleeve in place in the center of the hub. Then put a steel plate on the left side hub to use as a clamping surface and then carefully used outside race of the bearing as my other clamp surface, slowly and carefully pressed it in(the bearings went I fairly easy and I didn't do any damage to the bearing but if you not comfortable doing this take it to your local bike shop and have them do it). You'll press the right side bearing in until just touches the crush sleeve and that's it. The slight pressure should hold the crush sleeve in place and you can pull out the axle. Next you can install the wheel on the bike just as you normally would but without the spacers. Once you're wheel is on, you can measure up what length spacers you'll need. I used the 2 factory Vstar 1100 spacers(and ordered replacements if I ever want to go back to the stock Vstar front wheel) and cut off roughly 1/3 of each spacer. Then reinstalled the wheel with the spacers and tightened everything down and that part is done. If you're running dual front brakes then you done and ready to go.

If you're going single front brake like I did, you'll need to pull off whatever side caliper you're not using(in my case he right side). And swap out the dual front brake line for the single 18" one mentioned above. After that you'll just need to refill and bleed the brakes and you're all done and ready to go.

Some extra goodies I went with that raised the cost for me slightly was I went with a stainless steel braided brake line about $35 of eBay. A standard rubber line is around $20. Also I went with a polished 11.5" Harley brake rotor which was about $65 off eBay. So my total cost for this conversion was about $225, but still beats the $800 plus for an aftermarket front wheel.***
Great write up, thank you
 

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If it's anything like mine, it just felt a little quicker on the turn in....but after 5 minutes of riding I couldn't really tell if there was much difference....not a huge change and I got used to it.
 

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Here's a write-up for how I did it. If you have any pointers or questions on what I did or how to spruce up the write-up let me know.

***Here's a way to do a Harley front wheel conversion that allows you to retain you stock 17mm axle shaft, thus allowing you to go back and forth between Harley front wheels and Vstar 1100 front wheels. Total cost on this conversion was about $160 total.

What you'll need:
-2000+ Harley softail front wheel of your choosing
- 2 - 62304/17 AB Bearing 17x52x21 Sealed bearings from VXB.com
- 1 - 5" long steel tube with a 18mm inner diameter and a decent wall thickness (for crush sleeve).
-1 single 18" long brake line of your choice(if going single front brake).

Firstly,
I was able to find a 2007 Harley softail front wheel on a tire with the 11.5" rotor for $100 off Craigslist. I then pulled out the stock bearings that were in the wheel. They're pressed in so you'll need to have them pulled out at a motorcycle shop or get a bearing puller. You can find a cheap inner bearing slide hammer puller off eBay for about $40. Once you have the old bearings out, Next you'll install the bearings and crush sleeve. You can take this to your local bike shop and have it done or do what I did and save some money if you have the ability. You'll press in the left side bearing until it seats all the way in the wheel. To do this I used 2 small scrap 1/4" thick small steel plates I had and a c-clamp to do this. I stood the wheel up on a table and put one steel plate against the right side hub and the other against the face of the bearing I was pressing into on the left side. The steel plates allow you to clamp down and press in the bearing with even pressure across the whole bearing face and gives you an area to put the c-clamp faces on securely for clamping. Once the left side bearing is in, you'll take the 5" long steel tube mentioned above and put it in the center of the hub. This will be used as a crush sleeve so when you tighten the axle in the fork you don't over tighten and squeeze the inner races on the bearings and cause premature bearing failure. Next install the right side bearing. Now for this it's a little more tricky. I set the right side bearing in the hub and put the axle through the bearing and crush sleeve solely to hold the crush sleeve in place in the center of the hub. Then put a steel plate on the left side hub to use as a clamping surface and then carefully used outside race of the bearing as my other clamp surface, slowly and carefully pressed it in(the bearings went I fairly easy and I didn't do any damage to the bearing but if you not comfortable doing this take it to your local bike shop and have them do it). You'll press the right side bearing in until just touches the crush sleeve and that's it. The slight pressure should hold the crush sleeve in place and you can pull out the axle. Next you can install the wheel on the bike just as you normally would but without the spacers. Once you're wheel is on, you can measure up what length spacers you'll need. I used the 2 factory Vstar 1100 spacers(and ordered replacements if I ever want to go back to the stock Vstar front wheel) and cut off roughly 1/3 of each spacer. Then reinstalled the wheel with the spacers and tightened everything down and that part is done. If you're running dual front brakes then you done and ready to go.

If you're going single front brake like I did, you'll need to pull off whatever side caliper you're not using(in my case he right side). And swap out the dual front brake line for the single 18" one mentioned above. After that you'll just need to refill and bleed the brakes and you're all done and ready to go.

Some extra goodies I went with that raised the cost for me slightly was I went with a stainless steel braided brake line about $35 of eBay. A standard rubber line is around $20. Also I went with a polished 11.5" Harley brake rotor which was about $65 off eBay. So my total cost for this conversion was about $225, but still beats the $800 plus for an aftermarket front wheel.***
That's by far the simplest way to do the conversion. 2000+ means sealed bearings....which means you can find lots of alternative sized bearings.

I found some Harley spacers in my toolbox that did the job for me, so you can buy them new as well if you don't want to mess with cutting the V Star ones. I think I paid less than $5 each for them a few years back when doing another project.

I had to go a little different route with the 95 FXST wheel....definitely wasn't as easy, but got the wheel with rotor shipped for $90...so I just made it work. :surprise:

I'm going to put on 2" extended forks in a few weeks (hopefully) to give the bike a little more attitude. Since I've had them for a couple of years I might as well use them!
 

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If it's anything like mine, it just felt a little quicker on the turn in....but after 5 minutes of riding I couldn't really tell if there was much difference....not a huge change and I got used to it.
you hit 3 for 3 lighter wheel, better looking, good handling. what's better that than that.
 

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you hit 3 for 3 lighter wheel, better looking, good handling. what's better that than that.
It's hard to beat, that's for sure. Though the tires are a bit more expensive. I could think of a only a few things better than that.....

It does give these Stars a really good look.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That's by far the simplest way to do the conversion. 2000+ means sealed bearings....which means you can find lots of alternative sized bearings.

I found some Harley spacers in my toolbox that did the job for me, so you can buy them new as well if you don't want to mess with cutting the V Star ones. I think I paid less than $5 each for them a few years back when doing another project.

I had to go a little different route with the 95 FXST wheel....definitely wasn't as easy, but got the wheel with rotor shipped for $90...so I just made it work. :surprise:

I'm going to put on 2" extended forks in a few weeks (hopefully) to give the bike a little more attitude. Since I've had them for a couple of years I might as well use them!

I ordered a replacement set of Vstar spacers for like $10 off eBay. This was a very easy swap with the '00+ style bearing set-up and wheels are always coming up for cheap also. I did the full swap in about 3.5 hours. While hanging with some buddies who wanted to see the ins and outs of some the modifications I do to my bikes. I'm the only one in our group that really gets in depth with modifying my bikes, so I'm like a guru to them lol. But it's cool and they always learn something when they visit my garage for whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Can you retain the stock fender with the 21" wheel or will it not look right?
To be honest I didn't even check. I'm not gonna run it but I can mock it up and take a few pics tomorrow to show what it would look like.
 

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What did you use/where did you find something to use as a crash sleeve in 18mm? What was the OD of the sleeve? How did you keep the sleeve straight enough with a 17mm axle in an 18mm hole?

Thanks for the write up! Waiting on my bearings to arrive to mount my wheel now.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you wouldn't mind that would be great.

Also, would this conversion work with a 26" Harley front wheel?
Im running the stock custom fender now, fits great and looks good. And this conversion would work for just about any front wheel, just gotta find the correct bearings. But I'm not sure 26" would fit with out a rake.

 

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Discussion Starter #20
What did you use/where did you find something to use as a crash sleeve in 18mm? What was the OD of the sleeve? How did you keep the sleeve straight enough with a 17mm axle in an 18mm hole?

Thanks for the write up! Waiting on my bearings to arrive to mount my wheel now.
I used some stainless steel tube I bought off the web. It's like 22mm od and 18mm id. And the crush sleeve is just in there to keep the inner races from crushing inward when u you tighten the axle in the fork. So it's just around the shaft. That's only about .039 thousandths so clearance is fine and it's not going to be super loose or anything. I've got about 500 miles on the conversion and am very happy with it.
 
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