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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone -

Haven't been on the forum in nearly two years. My '08 Vstar 1100 hurled me in a high-side accident in August 2012 when an old driver turned in front of me.

Regardless, I have got my itch back and am looking at used 1100s and 950s. There is a 2004 1100cc for sale for $3500 OBO. I haven't looked at it in person, but in the picture it looks good and the seller claims it is in excellent condition. Thing is, it has 31,000 miles on it. I used to ride 6-7000 miles per year as I drove my bikes to work, but at this point, I am just going to pleasure riding with just a few thousand miles per year at the most.

First, what do you think this bike is worth? Second, is 31K too many miles to consider?

Please share your thoughts. Thanks.
 

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Hi Everyone -

Haven't been on the forum in nearly two years. My '08 Vstar 1100 hurled me in a high-side accident in August 2012 when an old driver turned in front of me.

Regardless, I have got my itch back and am looking at used 1100s and 950s. There is a 2004 1100cc for sale for $3500 OBO. I haven't looked at it in person, but in the picture it looks good and the seller claims it is in excellent condition. Thing is, it has 31,000 miles on it. I used to ride 6-7000 miles per year as I drove my bikes to work, but at this point, I am just going to pleasure riding with just a few thousand miles per year at the most.

First, what do you think this bike is worth? Second, is 31K too many miles to consider?

Please share your thoughts. Thanks.
No need to worry about mileage on an 1100 (as long as it appears to be well cared for) until it's over the 100,000 mile mark...even then, there are lots on the road with closer to 200,000 and going strong.

You may be able to get the price down a little more, but even at $3500, if it's in good shape it's a pretty good price.
 

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The only thing that high miles damages is the resale value. How many motorcycles have you ever seen that were worn out? They may be "worn out" due to lack of use or abuse but miles alone doesn't wear them out.
 

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I don't know about your part of the country but in the twin cities area there is a good selection of V Star's for sale. I found mine in the twin cities area. It's an '06 with 13,000 miles, excellent shape. I paid $4000. I see several more in the same area for about the same price. A 2004 with that many miles seems a bit high on the price to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't know about your part of the country but in the twin cities area there is a good selection of V Star's for sale. I found mine in the twin cities area. It's an '06 with 13,000 miles, excellent shape. I paid $4000. I see several more in the same area for about the same price. A 2004 with that many miles seems a bit high on the price to me.
Thanks for the info. I live in upstate NY, near Rochester. I have been monitoring prices and this one seems about in the middle of the pack, though the mileage is an outlier. I have not seen another with that many clicks of the odometer. I don't think I would pay $3500, perhaps $3000 at the most, depending upon the condition. I am sure with those miles it won't be a quick seller.
 

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With any gasoline or diesel powered machine, I'd rather have one that is used often and serviced and maintained properly. Low miles doesn't necessarily mean well cared for and high miles doesn't necessarily mean poor condition.
 

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I've heard of several 1100's with 150k on them.

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i've seen several cars with over 200K miles on them. it doesn't mean they have any market value at that point.


according to nadaguides, the average retail price of a 2004 1100 classic is $3690, with no regard to miles and lower suggested retail of $2800.
http://www.nadaguides.com/Motorcycles/2004/Yamaha/XVS11AS-C-V-STAR-CLASSIC-1063cc/Values

kbb lists suggested retail value at $3675 with trade-in value of $2500.
http://www.kbb.com/motorcycles/yamaha/v-star-1100-classic/2004-yamaha-v-star-1100-classic/suggestedretailvalue/

these are average dealer prices with no regard for miles. customers determine the open market value for bikes based on mileage. and most of the 10 year old bikes being resold usually have under 10K miles. individual consumers will put more of a premium or value on lower mileage bikes than higher mileage bikes, meaning a lower mileage bike should usually sell for more than a higher mileage bike. doesn't have anything to do with what condition the bike is in, but it is a determining factor in resell value. and despite how much value the owner may want to put on accessories, these usually add very little value to what a customer will pay or should pay.

having said all that, and realizing the $3500 is just a starting point, it's probably too much to pay for a 10 year old bike with what is considered high mileage for resell. i think the owner should be willing to let the bike go in the $2800-$3k range.

in regards to the original question, i don't believe 31,000 miles on a 10 year old yamaha is a lot. just broken in. as others have said, yamaha bikes should get a ton more miles than that.
 

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Hi Everyone -

Haven't been on the forum in nearly two years. My '08 Vstar 1100 hurled me in a high-side accident in August 2012 when an old driver turned in front of me.

Regardless, I have got my itch back and am looking at used 1100s and 950s. There is a 2004 1100cc for sale for $3500 OBO. I haven't looked at it in person, but in the picture it looks good and the seller claims it is in excellent condition. Thing is, it has 31,000 miles on it. I used to ride 6-7000 miles per year as I drove my bikes to work, but at this point, I am just going to pleasure riding with just a few thousand miles per year at the most.

First, what do you think this bike is worth? Second, is 31K too many miles to consider?

Please share your thoughts. Thanks.

Selling my bike, I live in VT but drive to my parents in Buffalo all the time. We could easily figure something out if you think it might be a good fit.

http://burlington.craigslist.org/mcy/4548772242.html
 

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I wouldn't stress too much on the miles. Especially if you intend on keeping it and not selling in a few years. As said earlier the market you are in plays a big part in pricing but for what it's worth I recently purchased a 06 Silverado with just over 19K miles and I paid $3500 for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
UPDATE: Drove 1.5 hours to look at the bike, rode it, everything is good. Seller will come down on price. One problem: I was scared when I rode it. This was the first time on a bike since my accident. I walked away from the deal, feeling that being nervous was a reason not to buy. Now it is two days later, and I am having second thoughts about not pulling the trigger. I am 50/50 on calling the seller, making an offer, and haul it home on a trailer. I would then spend some time getting used to riding again with short trips and building confidence, as well as taking a Rider Course.

Thoughts? Advice?
 

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I think you gave yourself the best advice. If you go for it and buy it, could you resell it for the same price you paid in the event you decide not to get back in the saddle. Personally, I would go for it, trialer it home and go at my own pace to uild up my confidence. Your accident wasn't a small one and that has left you with some doubts for sure. Take the time you need and decide on your own terms.
 

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You need to ease back into it, buy a bike, take it easy and decide if your "nervousness" is a passing thing. Only you can decide whether your confidence will come back. If you don't try, you may regret not knowing. If you try and can't get back into it, maybe a different type of vehicle is the way to go. - like a Can Am Spyder.
 

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I agree here with the easing into it. I had just a minor spill and still had nerves getting back on after awhile without a bike. I knew when not on a bike, I had the itch to ride. When I got close to getting on again (including test rides) nervous as all get out; especially with a bike I didn't own. Finally, I pulled the trigger on my VStar, and the nerves are still there when I make little riding mistakes, but getting better, and the nervousness is going away. I'm also scheduled for another MSF BRC 2 class to get back the basics. And mine was a minor slide. Yours was much worse. It'll take time I think. Go slow, ride short. It'll center back or you could go trike. I almost did. (By the way, the vstars can be triked;) I looked into it and may do it in the future when I get old and too nervous on 2 wheels. Hang in there.


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Discussion Starter #16
Went ahead and pulled the trigger on the 2004 VStar. Paid $3300 for it, which is a little high, but it came with some extras, such as crash bars, leather wind protectors for legs, windshield extender, service manual, extra set of pipes (which I will sell), and a few oil filters.

I would have added the crash bars myself, so that was worth a few extra bucks.

Anyway, I want to tow this bike home on a 4x8 utility trailer. How should I strap it down? I assume ratchet straps, but where do I attach the straps safely on the bike? Any suggestions ? I've towed boats and sleds for years, never a bike.
 

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I towed my bike on a truck bed. Parked it straight in, not sideways because there was no room for lean and it would have bent the fenders. I used 4 ratchet straps, 2 on front, strapped to the fork through the headlight bar, and two on the back to each A frame piece on both sides directly below the seat. See pics where my fingers point. Strapped them down hard and kept it on its kickstand and locked bars. Drove two hours at 60-65mph. Barely budged. (Pulled over a couple of times on the highway cause I was worried about her though;) ImageUploadedByMO Free1405031754.900670.jpg ImageUploadedByMO Free1405031816.489993.jpg


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Ratchet straps will work but conventional wisdom calls for cam straps. The ratchet straps can be over tightened and compress the fork too much. I say if you are careful, ratchet straps work fine. I used loops instead of the standard hooks that come on straps.

I pulled my bike home on a similar size trailer.

I used a loop on each side of the top of the forks and straps on both sides angled to a point slightly forward of the forks. That way they pulled the bike forward into a front wheel chock. The front wheel chock holds the front wheel and keeps it from slipping sideways. Look online for chicks for bikes. If you are creative you can create a device to hold the front wheel. It can be as simple as a couple of 4x4s. It is important for the chock to be firmly attached to your trailer.

For the rear I used a strap looped around rear wheel and two straps to the frame near the back of the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the towing advice. I will bring four ratchet/cam straps and winch it down tight.
 
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