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Do any of you guys know whats interchangable between the 650 and 1100 V stars , mate has wrecked a 1100 and l have a 650 and was looking at changing out some parts like rear wheel assy so l end up with a higher diff ratio and a disc brake , front forks so l have duel disc's , motors interchangable ? etc
 

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The front brakes and wheel should swap. The rear dif I think you will have to do the old trial and error method. Let us know if it works.
Doug
 

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It could probably be done but nothings going to just bolt right up. It's probably gonna take more customization and fabrication than it's worth.
 

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Do any of you guys know whats interchangable between the 650 and 1100 V stars , mate has wrecked a 1100 and l have a 650 and was looking at changing out some parts like rear wheel assy so l end up with a higher diff ratio and a disc brake , front forks so l have duel disc's , motors interchangable ? etc
Sorry to bring up an old post but did this ever work? I would like to do a rear disc conversion myself
 

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there are a lot of parts that are common to all Vstar bikes

Headlights, tail lights, turn signals, mirrors, hand grips and levers, brake calipers... you can see where yamaha kept many things the same so the parts would be less expensive and easier for a dealer to keep in stock

but different engine sizes require just about the entire drivetrain and wheels to be different
 

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Well that being said someone needs to make a conversion kit lol. My drum brakes work good but I'm not sure how they would work during a hard stop with me and my fiance riding. I'm just thinking about safety.
 

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Well that being said someone needs to make a conversion kit lol. My drum brakes work good but I'm not sure how they would work during a hard stop with me and my fiance riding. I'm just thinking about safety.

you need to take your bike out solo and slow down to 20 mph going straight, and nail the rear brake to the floorboards, and hold it there till the bike stops

practice aggressive braking every time you ride, when there is no one behind you

you need to know exactly how quickly you can stop, and you need to be able to do it without thinking about it, and without locking the front brake and dropping the bike
 

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Trust me, the rear drum brake will work if adjusted properly. I've managed to lock the rear drum brake in a controlled environment in an intermediate MC training session.
You should be practicing emergency stopping in a parking lot with your fiance in an empty parking using a combination of front and rear brakes, it is doable.
 

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70% of your braking is from the front wheel, if you are using only the rear brake to stop you are doing it wrong. Learn to use the front brake, be careful when using it on loose surfaces and rain ,these are thing you will learn in a rider safety course.
 

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I do use my front brake for all stopping situations. If not I'd fall over at complete stop just using the rear brake lol. Ive been riding on 2 wheels for years so I do have experience. I use my rear as a helper and when I have to just slow down and not come to a complete stop. My concern was just in a situation when I had to jam on my front brake and to keep from wrecking the bike and having to steer in that situation I would really need to rely on my rear brake. I will go through a few practice runs in a parking lot before my honeymoon.
 

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One of the drills in the MSF course is to get up to about 25 and you have to stop in a small rectangle without locking up the rear. Once you feel the momentum throw you forward slightly you can hit the front brake pretty good and you will stop quick. Hitting the front brake hard also depends on road conditions...loose gravel, sand, grass clipping, tar snakes, pressed on traffic controls etc when wet are very slick, auto fluids leaking all present stopping challenges. If you have not taken a MSF course I recommend them highly!
 

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... I use my rear as a helper and when I have to just slow down and not come to a complete stop.
My concern...when I had to jam on my front brake and to keep from wrecking the bike and having to steer in that situation I would really need to rely on my rear brake.
I will go through a few practice runs in a parking lot before my honeymoon.
maybe its just the way you phrase things, you threw up a lot of red flags in three sentences...

its better to always use both brakes together, so the bike always responds the same way. There are exceptions like trail-braking hot thru a tight curve, but for normal riding situations you want your muscle memory to kick in

never jam on the front brake - that is the most common cause of dropping the bike. Sit on your bike and lock the front brake and push forward on the grips. Notice how the front shock loads up and the front drops. You want to apply an increasing pressure to the front brake when stopping so the weight shifts forward and the shocks load up and drop as you apply it. In the MSF course they call this progressive braking. You can load it up quickly, a second is good - half a second is ok...

the more weight that has shifted to the front tire, the more braking power it has. So if you just 'jam' on the front brake the front tire will stop spinning.

This is a good time to point out the only thing that keeps a motorcycle from falling over at speed is the wonderful gyroscopic forces of the heavy spinning tires. When the wheels stop spinning the bike will fall over (just like when you stop for a light).

the other red flag you threw up is braking and steering to avoid a collision - you need to chose one: either brake to a stop, or swerve to avoid a collision. When its all or nothing you cannot do both, and you will spend the rest of your life telling people "I had to lay that bike down..." the bike will lay itself down

when you are riding normally and not pushing the bike to its limits, you can brake in a curve or corner if you countersteer to keep the bike going where you want it to go - but if you are using up all your traction for one (steering or braking) adding the second will make the tire skid out. If you are going fast enough in a curve to feel panic, then steer around an obstacle, or straighten the bike first, then panic stop. If need to steer around something go wide if you can.

Im not intending to question your riding abilities - we are discussing this where hundreds of new riders could see it over the next 10 years, its important to be clear when it comes to things that frequently cause accidents.
 

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the other red flag you threw up is braking and steering to avoid a collision - you need to chose one: either brake to a stop, or swerve to avoid a collision. When its all or nothing you cannot do both, and you will spend the rest of your life telling people "I had to lay that bike down..." the bike will lay itself down
I've been meaning to ask this question for awhile. Why is laying down a bike considered a good strategy? I know way way back it was taught but with modern rubber, triple disc brakes (and sometimes abs) aren't you going to stop way faster that sliding down the road on pipes and covers?
 
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