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Discussion Starter #1
In FL there are no inspections, so you see a lot of vehicles with poorly aimed headlights. Since there are no inspection stations checking our headlight aim, we have to make our own adjustments (or go pay someone/shop to do it for us).

The method that I was taught is to use is to park on level ground about 25 feet from a wall or garage door or such, when it is dark enough to see the "light spot" created by the headlight shining on the surface. Measure the height to the center of the headlight bulb at the bike (or car), then measure the light spot on the door/wall. The center spot of the headlight should be adjusted to be at the same height from the ground when measured at the door/wall.

This doesn't work on my 4X4 which is lifted as it will get the "your high beams are on flash"from other drivers, so I have to aim the lights about 4 inches below the height. But this should work fine for stock height bikes and cars.

Or is there a better or more accurate way to do this - without a headlight aiming tool?
 

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I work in a shop and we have a headlight aiming device. I found your method works better. Then a slight adjustment to your liking after that. Using the same method but only to keep them even.
 

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First I have to ask which bike you have?

The headlight on my vstar 650 classic seemed to droop down over the last couple years. I hardly ever ride at night, but this last summer I noticed it was pretty low. I was going to pull the ring off and start adjusting, when I noticed there is a little black rubber like block under the headlight, and it was almost falling off. I pushed it back to where it looked like it was suppose to be, and it tilted the bucket back up about 10 degrees - perfect!

I never got to the bottom of that, I assume its suppose to be there and its suppose to be glued or something. I looked at the parts diagrams for the headlight assembly and did not see that "mount" block in there. I need to put some glue or DoubleSidedStickyTape on mine to keep it in place.

Having said all that, your headlights need to be adjusted while you are sitting on the bike, at least.

If you have a windshield and/or lowers / fork deflectors, then the wind load on the front forks will change with speed.

Bottom line... decide how far off you think your headlights are, adjust them a bit, go for a ride at night, tweak, ride, tweak... till you think it is right.

For me the best indication is when the highbeam lights up the street all the way down the block - when the center of the beam is level down the street, and then the low beam falls where it falls.

On my 650 I can reach up and move the bucket a bit up and down on the shock mounts while I'm riding and see if it looks better or worse, and then adjust it back home.

I don't know if MC shops are suppose to check the alignment of your headlight for inspections - Never came up anywhere that I have lived.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have the V-Star 1300 Deluxe (w/ batwing fairing) and I'm just finishing up installing the Passing Lamps (which will need some sort of adjustment too).
Your right about having to sit on bike to squat suspension and to keep bike straight up. That makes it a two person job. The Deluxe has a headlight aiming mechanism built into the bucket (maybe all the 1300s do) so that should help with the adjustment. The passing lamps are "ball-seat" mounts.
 

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This is a super dumb question but how do you adjust the headlight on the 650? With my fork extenders, my headlight is pointed way too far up.
 

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the screws on the face of the headlight rim adjust the aim

the screws on the sides of the headlight bucket allow you to remove the rim to replace the bulb.

If you have modified the front end, the adjustment screws might not have enough travel to bring it back down as far as you need. Then you will need to look at the mounting bolts on the back of the bucket to the frame of the bike.
 

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This is a super dumb question but how do you adjust the headlight on the 650? With my fork extenders, my headlight is pointed way too far up.
there's two screws between the headlight and the trim ring the screw at 8 o'clock is for the horizontal or left to right adjustment and the one at 5 o'clock is the vertical or up down adjustment
 

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i just get in a dark area level the bike with a block and adjust the vertical it so the illumination spot that shining on the ground is as far out as possible and still lights up the ground then sit on the bike to see how much further i need to adjust up the horizontal is easy i adjust that a little to right of the center of the lane, with a stock halogen bulb your lucky if that spot reaches 100 feet an upgraded halogen might make 150 at those distances your out riding your headlight at 50mph
 

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Or is there a better or more accurate way to do this - without a headlight aiming tool?
I used the method from the Wiki Knowledge Base on Headlight Adjustment. Sounds a lot like your method.

[Edit] I just realized this was the general bike forum not the V Star forum. This method should work for all bikes and possibly autos as well.
 

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For all the tech-junk people seem to want to invent for motorcycles, a headlight that tracks the movement of the riders helmet would actually be pretty useful

or just mount the headlight on top of your helmet.....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
For all the tech-junk people seem to want to invent for motorcycles, a headlight that tracks the movement of the riders helmet would actually be pretty useful

or just mount the headlight on top of your helmet.....
This is the next best thing - adaptive headlights https://www.jwspeaker.com/products/adaptive-led-headlights-model-8790-adaptive/

Summary
The Model 8790 Adaptive motorcycle LED headlight calculates bank angles on a real-time basis using proprietary technology and on-board sensors, automatically directing the light array up or down as the motorcycle leans. This additional illumination fills in the gaps that traditional headlights can’t.
 

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When taking your height measurements you need to either have someone else do it while you are sitting on the bike or take that into consideration. The height of a freestanding bike is different than a loaded one.
 

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CountryB, Im considering getting an Yamaha FJR1300 sport touring bike for riding long distances at highway speeds. That is standard on the newer years. I think some of the bigger Vstar / Venture bikes have that as well.
 

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I used the method from the Wiki Knowledge Base on Headlight Adjustment. Sounds a lot like your method.

[Edit] I just realized this was the general bike forum not the V Star forum. This method should work for all bikes and possibly autos as well.
the problem with pointing it at a wall is that one set distance from the wall won't work because every headlight isn't the same, i tried that with mine and the spot was like 75 feet out and i could get it almost to 150 before it got to dim to be useful, i think i'll be going with projectors mounted on the engine guards for times when when the headlight just isn't cutting it, like on unlit curvy roads with no cars to help get some kind of reference when bends are co
ming up. when no traffic is out it gets real difficult to get a read on the road direction, it freaks me out when i lose the road even for a few seconds
 

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the problem with pointing it at a wall is that one set distance from the wall won't work because every headlight isn't the same
I didn't write that but I think the jest of that process is you want your low beam to angle downward. You may be OK with completely horizontal as I believe a motorcycle headlight would be lower than a passenger windshield but 2" and 10' is not much if there is no cutoff like a projector beam. I have projector headlights on both my autos. They have a straight cutoff. I noticed on some roads between dips and bumps, I can't see very far in front of me with low only. I leave my fog lights on to give me some additional light.
I have just installed a projector in my bike but I have not been in the dark yet nor have I tried to adjust them. Just turned it on after install to make sure it worked. I do have regular passing lights that stay on with low beam. Hoping the 2 together will be better than the crappy reflector of the V-Star 1100.
 

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I didn't write that but I think the jest of that process is you want your low beam to angle downward. You may be OK with completely horizontal as I believe a motorcycle headlight would be lower than a passenger windshield but 2" and 10' is not much if there is no cutoff like a projector beam. I have projector headlights on both my autos. They have a straight cutoff. I noticed on some roads between dips and bumps, I can't see very far in front of me with low only. I leave my fog lights on to give me some additional light.
I have just installed a projector in my bike but I have not been in the dark yet nor have I tried to adjust them. Just turned it on after install to make sure it worked. I do have regular passing lights that stay on with low beam. Hoping the 2 together will be better than the crappy reflector of the V-Star 1100.
did you get a knockoff daymaker if so which one ? i was thinking of doing that but i didn't know which one was worth buying, some knockoffs supposedly use cree leds and then there's the sunpie and so many others, i wish i knew which company made consistently good ones
 

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did you get a knockoff daymaker if so which one ? i was thinking of doing that but i didn't know which one was worth buying, some knockoffs supposedly use cree leds and then there's the sunpie and so many others, i wish i knew which company made consistently good ones
Well it came for Christmas. It was the Amazon one. Notice it has 6 LEDs where many of these are 4 LEDs. It does say Sunpie. I think she paid $49 with free shipping. It was very easy to install in the OEM ring. Took longer to get the windshield off that it did replacing the light. I like the way it looks.
 

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Well it came for Christmas. It was the Amazon one. Notice it has 6 LEDs where many of these are 4 LEDs. It does say Sunpie. I think she paid $49 with free shipping. It was very easy to install in the OEM ring. Took longer to get the windshield off that it did replacing the light. I like the way it looks.
does it actually shine farther down the road than your halogen? there seems to be some conjecture with a lot of these LED headlamps if they are really shining more light on the road. they are obviously brighter at close distances, but without proper projection some of them don't actually let you see any farther.
 

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does it actually shine farther down the road than your halogen? there seems to be some conjecture with a lot of these LED headlamps if they are really shining more light on the road. they are obviously brighter at close distances, but without proper projection some of them don't actually let you see any farther.
As I mentioned in post #15, I haven't actually used it at night yet but the factory light on the V Star 1100 is so crappy that I cannot believe this would be the same or worse. I had already upgraded the bulb in the factory lens/reflector to LED. It was better than halogen but still sucked. Hoping this projector will be better. Many claim they are. Good luck.
 
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