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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, ain't been for around for a bit, but thought I would look here for straight skinny/no **** advice. Got myself a bit of a problem. Any thoughts, been in the same boat, or just ideas are very welcome! Here it is: a young lady(in her 60's) has ask me to teach her how to ride! Wow, don't know what to do, she is a very old friend , BUT she has never ridden a lick other than on the back of some other folks bikes.
My first thought was tell her take the MSF course, but the way I get it they got a day class, next day on the range, is that right? What about a girl that has never pulled a clutch or twisted a throttle? Don't know what to do, I don't want her hurt or killed cause she is SO green:( Any thoughts, folks????
 

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You have described exactly what the Basic Rider Course 1 offered by the MSF was designed for, the very lowest level beginner rider. If I had to make the decision that you are faced with, I would encourage her to enroll and trust that they will take care of her.

Ensure that she has good protective gear.

Augie
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You have described exactly what the Basic Rider Course 1 offered by the MSF was designed for, the very lowest level beginner rider. If I had to make the decision that you are faced with, I would encourage her to enroll and trust that they will take care of her.

Ensure that she has good protective gear.

Augie
If she will not do the 3 wheeler thing, I will push her to the course. Thank you for your reply!:)
 

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any advice for a total rookie? Reply to Thread

Being an older female and away from motorcycles a number of years, I took the MSF basic 2 yrs ago. Found the instructors very helpful over the 3 day session. Also, the others in my class were all gents and encouraged me throughout the sessions! I, not only regained riding knowledge, but learned so much more to make my riding more safe. Since, I try to practice skills and increase my ability to ride.

YammyV
 

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+1 on encouraging her to take the course. Then after the course you can provide some coaching to improve her skills and keep her safe. Since the course provides the motorcycles you don't have to risk yours for her to learn the basics.
 

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The very first technical thing you should teach her is to walk the bike in neutral. Let her push the bike under her own power. Start it. Stop it. Turn it around. Figure out where the brakes are, etc. When she's done tell her she just finished lesson 1 of the MSF course work would she like to sign up?

Continuing with reality. She is in her sixties. Our spirits stay young forever but damned if our bodies don't give out prematurely. If she is standing on her tip toes manhandling a bike with a high COG and engine that rattles her eyeballs and suspension that will separate her hip, she may not stay a rider for long.
 

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Hey Sugar Bear,
Missed your postings of late. Everyone has given you great advice. Sparkn is dead on with the basics. That's how I first learned to ride dirt bikes then onto street bikes. It builds confidence in knowing how your bike functions.
 

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Send her to the course. You can even attend it with her if it gives her more confidence. They are trained to teach people how to ride. No offense but you are not. Not that you can't but from your first post it's obvious you has hesitant to take on the responsibility. In the class she will most likely be on a little 250cc bike that's easy to handle and gain confidence with. When I took the class there were two ladies that had never been on a bike. One didn't even know what a clutch was. They were both riding within a few hours the first day. Granted they weren't in their 60's but I still think that's her best starting place.
 

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I would have her get familiar with your bike as far as controls and where everything is so she doesn't get overwhelmed on the first day of class. Definitely take her somewhere so she can get proper riding gear. Sometimes having proper gear takes away the anxiety.
 

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I like tre607's approach. I've seen to many of my students not give a sh17 about where the controls are until they just about or have a fall. But I have to say that most students are eager and do very well. You should make sure she realizes that driving a bike is not like riding on the back. The forces that make the bike go, the vision you have to have, leaning the bike and not being affraid of turning the handle bars etc.

All this to say, encourage her to take the course.
 

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Probably wouldn't hurt to supplement the course with the Ride Like a Pro videos by Jerry Palladino. I am experienced rider and ordered one - and watched it more than once. Very helpful.

Best advice I can give, but not sure at which stage it best applies…keep your damn head up while riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Folks, I would like to wrap this thread up a heartfelt THANK YOU to all of your posts with ideas, comments and advice. I had her come to the house tonight and read what y'all had said. She sat silent as she read, lingering on each post. When she was done, still silent for a bit, then said "I need to take the MSF course". In my mind I think: WHOO-HOO, YES! I do feel you folks could have very well saved a life and have helped make a new rider, as well as saving my bike from disaster.Summer you are spot on, I am not a teacher, I been on the road well over 50 years, but a rider does not necessarily a teacher make. (I ride a 1100 V-Star Silverado Classic:D) Much appreciated folks:D Take Care and Ride Safe.
 

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Looking forward to seeing pics of ya'lls first ride together. :)
 

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Another virtue of the MSF course, at least here in Nebraska, is that it eliminates the need for the written and driving test at the DMV to get the motorcycle endorsement. Here, the course runs about $200. They supply the bikes and the helmets, but require suitable clothing. She will get to use their bike, and if she decides motorcycling isn't for her, she will not have bought a motorcycle she'll have to resell at a loss.
 

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Buy and study Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well
By: David L. Hough

LoupGarou
 
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