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I'm curious as to what my fellow riders are paying for tire changing services. I've been calling around to local stealerships all morning and the prices seem to be pretty darn high, like $40-$100!:confused: (I'm providing the tire, inner tube, and wheel already dismounted) What are you guys paying and any recommendations of places?
 

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I always change my own tires but those prices seem to be pretty much in line with everything I've read about it. Different places are going to charge you whatever amount they want to. $40 is kind of on the low side but I have heard of people getting it done for $20-$25.
 

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Well after searching all morning I was finally able to locate a fella on craigslist that does tire changes out of his own garage and has all the equipment. $20 bucks :D
 

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My local metric dealer does tire changes for $40 if you just bring in the wheel. It's $60 if you bring in the bike and they have to remove the wheel. It's worth the extra $20 to just ride the bike in. Just had both my tires replaced a while back, they did also charge me and extra $6 for old tire disposal. My local HD dealer where I bought my V star told me it'd be $100 to change a tire (on the bike). Easy choice where to go. Motorcycle tires and changes can get mighty expensive.
 

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I have a friend that balances his own motorcycle tires. Apparently it is super easy. All you have to do is spin the tire. If it stops and then rolls some in the opposite direction, it is unbalanced. If you have a spoked rim, like the V Star 650, the weights just clip onto the spokes.

Harbor Freight sells a motorcycle tire balancer for like $75 I think. However, people say that the Harbor Freight balancer is a hunk of junk and you don't even need it to balance the tire.
 

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don't be so cheap

I changed my own rear tire on my 950. I will never do it again. When I pulled the axle out, spacers fell from everywhere. When I took off the belt pulley, more spacers. A friend of mine made his own bead breaker out of angle iron that is mounted on his wall in his garage. He modified a harbor freight tire changer to fit into the trailer hitch on his pickup. To balance, we put the axle through the wheel and set it on a couple of jack stands. We used stick on weights that we bought at NAPA. It took us about an hour and a half. Next time I will take it to a professional with the right tool for the job.
 

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Some dealerships will refuse to mount a tire they didn't sell, claiming liability issues. Others will charge more to change/mount a tire you bring in, presumably because they didn't get the profit from selling the tire. Make sure when you have a tire changed you recheck all the work including air pressure and chain or belt adjustment. Tires are often changed by the "new guy."
 

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Needing a new rear tire for my Venture, I bought one online paying for most of it with AMEX points. The shop that installed the last set (purchased there) refuses to install anything not purchased there. I called the local Yamaha dealer. First two calls went to voice mail. Third call on another number was answered and sent to the service department where I was on hold through three holding sessions. I hung up. I'm getting squeezed in at another dealer on Friday. Drive the bike in and wait for it, $85. I don't consider that unreasonable at all.
 

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I changed my own rear tire on my 950. I will never do it again. When I pulled the axle out, spacers fell from everywhere. When I took off the belt pulley, more spacers. A friend of mine made his own bead breaker out of angle iron that is mounted on his wall in his garage. He modified a harbor freight tire changer to fit into the trailer hitch on his pickup. To balance, we put the axle through the wheel and set it on a couple of jack stands. We used stick on weights that we bought at NAPA. It took us about an hour and a half. Next time I will take it to a professional with the right tool for the job.
---- caution this post may be considered a personal rant LOL -----

+1 - I am not inclined to ever want to take on a tire change myself. My DEALERSHIP treats me fairly and they get me in and out quickly.(I dislike the word Stealership, you do know they have to pay employees, have insurance (maybe unlike that "guy in the garage") , etc. not to mention they are in business and expect to make a profit.)

I have 4 local Yammy dealers, all within 30 minutes, and it doesn't mean I don't do price checks at 1 or more of them. I have used 3 out of the 4 for service, mostly because of one of them having what I want as an in stock item and drive in appointments available, but 90% of the time I go to my selling dealer. Because of it they match or beat online prices whenever possible on accessories, and always discount Yammy stuff. Some times a good relationship with your dealer goes much farther than just getting it cheap :D

"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." Paul "Red" Adair

-----rant over we now return you to normal forum posting LOL-----
 

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But as an answer to the original question - I just had the front changed, they removed and replaced wheel on the bike and changed and balanced tire, and it was $45.00 + cost of tire.
 

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+1 - I am not inclined to ever want to take on a tire change myself. My DEALERSHIP treats me fairly and they get me in and out quickly.(I dislike the word Stealership, you do know they have to pay employees, have insurance (maybe unlike that "guy in the garage") , etc. not to mention they are in business and expect to make a profit.)

I don't like "stealership" either. It is the same sort of "cutesy" writing that will call a tire a "hoop" or a revolver a "wheelgun."

I got talking with one of the higher-ups at a multibrand dealership a while back. He eventually told me it costs between $5000 and $7000 per DAY to keep the doors open on his store. Remember he is not only paying his employees. He is also paying the utility bill for heating or air conditioning and lights. He is paying debt service on the money he borrowed to buy inventory (bikes, ATVs, parts, helmets, clothing, etc.) and the money he borrowed to build his building. He is paying property tax on the building and probably on his inventory and tools. It ain't cheap, running a store.
 

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He is paying debt service on the money he borrowed to buy inventory (bikes, ATVs, parts, helmets, clothing, etc.) and the money he borrowed to build his building. He is paying property tax on the building and probably on his inventory and tools. It ain't cheap, running a store.
While true, the fact that many of them are charging exorbitant prices on certain things doesn't help the situation. It's not my fault that the dealership 3 miles from my house has to spend money to stay in business.

They've had a 2005 V Star 650 with a price tag of $5500 on it since March. I've bought 3 motorcycles since then, but he's still sitting on that same bike at the same price. How's that elevated price working out for him?

I had one rear tire mounted at that dealership and paid $82 after tax and fees. I then proceeded to buy 5 more tires at the dealership that is 30 miles away, because they only charge $37.50 with the wheel on the bike.

Guess that guy is going to have to charge $6500 for that 650 next year, and raise his price for wheel changes to $125 in order to make up for the fact that business is slow. Must be the economy...couldn't be his terrible pricing.
 

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I live in a town of 80,000 and there is only one Yamaha dealership within 100 miles. I could have saved a little when I bought the bike by going to Seattle which is a 6 hour drive.

I paid $65 to have a new rear tire installed. Other than oil changes I have all my work done in their shop. Maybe I could find an independent shop do some work and save a little money but I think there is value in having a relationship. I know the store manager, the shop manager a couple of mechanics and the parts people.

When I need an accessory (not Yamaha brand) I take them the price I've found on the internet and except for a Sena they have always matched or came very close to my price. The parts folks make commission, so even if my guy is off that day they credit him for the sale. I get really good service.

For my benefit in the relationship, I know I get scheduled quick when I'm trying to leave town or they have no appointments, I still get in. If I need something I know I'll get taken care of.

And I always tip the mechanic who works on my bike. I ask for the same guy everytime and I think it pays off.

Anyway,
I paid $65 for a tire change :)
 
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