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I keep my v star 1300 plugged to a battery tender when not riding. I have noticed that after riding, it takes the battery tender light a couple of hours to turn green. Is this normal or does it indicate that my bike is not keeping the battery charged?
 

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Depends on length of ride. Starting a bike is a large draw on a battery. A short ride would not completely charge the battery totally back up. But will charge the battery enough for future starts. A battery tender is a trickle charger and only supplies a very small charge. If the battery it 1/10 of a volt low, might take a few hours to get it back up. It battery seems like it's holding a charge, just keep an eye on it.
 

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There's no power where I store my bike so I'm planning to pull the battery and bring it in and put the tender I just bought on it for the winter. Any reason not to have it in a living space?
 

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I think the light on your battery tender is more of a timer thing than a real voltage indicator. Battery tenders only put out a trickle. They don't put out enough to actually charge a discharged battery. That's why they are called maintainers, not chargers. So I don't think the light really tells you anything useful. I'll bet if you turn on the tender and let it run until the light comes on, then disconnect it, unplug the tender for 5 minutes, then reconnect it all, the light will do the exact same thing all over again. Stay off for a couple hours, and then turn on.
 
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There's no power where I store my bike so I'm planning to pull the battery and bring it in and put the tender I just bought on it for the winter. Any reason not to have it in a living space?
This might not work for you in VT, but I use a solar battery maintainer on my truck. It just sits on the dash and plugs in to the cigar lighter. Or an SAE connector if you have that. My truck often doesn't get started for a couple of weeks, and it is a diesel that needs a lot of juice to start. That little solar panel keeps the battery in good enough state of charge. Barely does the job on my truck with big dual batteries, but would be ample charge for a bike size battery or even a car batt. I think it was around $35 on Amazon.
 
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This might not work for you in VT, but I use a solar battery maintainer on my truck. It just sits on the dash and plugs in to the cigar lighter. Or an SAE connector if you have that. My truck often doesn't get started for a couple of weeks, and it is a diesel that needs a lot of juice to start. That little solar panel keeps the battery in good enough state of charge. Barely does the job on my truck with big dual batteries, but would be ample charge for a bike size battery or even a car batt. I think it was around $35 on Amazon.
Yep I have one of those solar maintainers and does not keep my truck batteries charged up.
I have dual batteries and a cummins diesel that I drive maybe 1 day a month.
In the summer, no problem but winter kills my batteries.
The grid heater takes 190 amps alone.
Once the wait to start light goes out, there is barely enough to crank it over.
I installed a marine onboard trickle charger and maintainer and wired it to the battery and keep it plugged in.
Has absolutely no problem starting now when I need it!
 

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...Any reason not to have it in a living space?
Forgot this part. As long as it is an AGM, no problem in living space. Don't do it with regular LA batteries.
 
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There's no power where I store my bike so I'm planning to pull the battery and bring it in and put the tender I just bought on it for the winter. Any reason not to have it in a living space?
@bpounds mentioned not charging Lead Acid batteries indoors. When a lead acid battery charges, hydrogen gas, which is explosive, is released into the air. If there is a spark or flame nearby it could ignite the hydrogen. A typical lead acid battery, the kind you can add water to, a Gel battery and an AGM (absorbent glass mat) are all lead acid batteries, they differ in their construction and how they contain the electrolyte. They will all, to some extent, release hydrogen when charging. Just make sure you are not charging it near your furnace and keep it out of the kitchen and ensure the area is well ventilated.
 

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@bpounds mentioned not charging Lead Acid batteries indoors. When a lead acid battery charges, hydrogen gas, which is explosive, is released into the air. If there is a spark or flame nearby it could ignite the hydrogen. A typical lead acid battery, the kind you can add water to, a Gel battery and an AGM (absorbent glass mat) are all lead acid batteries, they differ in their construction and how they contain the electrolyte. They will all, to some extent, release hydrogen when charging. Just make sure you are not charging it near your furnace and keep it out of the kitchen and ensure the area is well ventilated.
I have a 3 season porch that has leaky windows. Should be perfect for this because it keeps warmer temps and air flow to allow the fumes to escape. No heat sources other than a leaky kitchen door. :)
 

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My garage is insulated, heated only when I'm going to be out there. Also its attached to the house. Temp rarely drops much below freezing by much. Perfect for the summer vehicle batteries to winter over on maintainers! I wouldn't store any battery near a heat source, or in your living space. The fumes will cause problems, you don't want to be breathing them either!

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I think the light on your battery tender is more of a timer thing than a real voltage indicator. Battery tenders only put out a trickle. They don't put out enough to actually charge a discharged battery. That's why they are called maintainers, not chargers. So I don't think the light really tells you anything useful. I'll bet if you turn on the tender and let it run until the light comes on, then disconnect it, unplug the tender for 5 minutes, then reconnect it all, the light will do the exact same thing all over again. Stay off for a couple hours, and then turn on.
Thanks. I will try the disconnect to see how it reacts.
 
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