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Last night after leaving a friends house I was riding on a unfamiliar road with my daughter and missed a corner, God was with us there was a dirt lane at the corner and kept the shiner side up, it had to be the hand of God that kept us that way, so after saying all that be familiar with the roads you are riding especially after dark.
 

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Was speed a little factor also ?
 

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Glad to hear that it was only a "close call". Try to remember to look beyond the corner and don't focus on "the corner" and you'll be better off.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was going 25 mph because I wasn't familiar with the road and the corner is unmarked the county roads around here are lucky to even be marked with metal signs
 

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Hi quenston, I done a post a good bit ago about a road near here that is a nightmare, folks come out of the flatlands buzzin right along and hit these 90s and lots of road rash, broken bones, and sadly, deaths. Wart and eater give great points: your speed and be aware will sure help to keep you livin:cool: Be smart(everyone) and Ride Safe.
 

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Thank God you had an angel flying with you! I hope you daughter didnt get to scared. Do you have a Guardian Bell on your bike? I swear I have heard my ring a couple times. Good to hear your ok. I did that about a month ago. It was dusk and I had forgotten my prescription night glasses. I went a little to hot into a turn (on a windy downhill mountain)and scared the heck out of myself. At the bottom of the mountain I asked my boyfriend did he see my scary turn. He said yes he was thinking nice babe your hitting it hard then he saw me tense up and realized I was not meaning to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank God you had an angel flying with you! I hope you daughter didnt get to scared. Do you have a Guardian Bell on your bike? I swear I have heard my ring a couple times. Good to hear your ok. I did that about a month ago. It was dusk and I had forgotten my prescription night glasses. I went a little to hot into a turn (on a windy downhill mountain)and scared the heck out of myself. At the bottom of the mountain I asked my boyfriend did he see my scary turn. He said yes he was thinking nice babe your hitting it hard then he saw me tense up and realized I was not meaning to do it.
I do have a guardian bell that was bought for me by my wife. My problem was that I didn't even know the corner was there until it was to late took the back way home and had only been that way one time previously. Surprisingly after we got stopped and I pulled the seat from my butt my daughter was laughing hysterically and said the hole time I was yelling Jesus like a girl. She said it scared her at first but we ended up riding another 30 miles and she was fine wanting to ride today in 45 degree weather
 

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Glad to hear that it was only a "close call". Try to remember to look beyond the corner and don't focus on "the corner" and you'll be better off.
Was taught that tip in my training/safety course. It rings true. You will be more likely to have issues looking at your front wheel, other than down the road a ways. In theory, the bike goes where your eyes go. Head up, and watching ahead at least 8-10 car lengths. It really works.
Of course this is harder to do without the assistance of daylight.
 

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Agree - a curve can throw you

Blame this on inexperience. An acquaintance (on military leave) bought a new Harley. The second day of possession he dropped it on its side, braking the clutch lever. The third day he took a sharp curve too fast, shot across the other lane, and ran right into a brick wall.
He was very lucky that there was no oncoming car and suffered "only" a shoulder separation.

Yes, you have to know your roads, and approach bends and curves at a controllable speed. Easy to say but how many time do we hear about riders going down on a curve.
 

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Know your bike -- Agree

You're right, Bevo1981. It's about being one with your bike. Although I've ridden in my younger days, I haven't been on a bike in 30 years. In order to avoid an undesirable incident on the streets, I spent nearly 25 hours on parking lots just getting the feel of a bike underneath me, particularly a powerful Yamaha Warrior. And, slowly, gradually increased my speed on our back roads. I still have a ways to go until that confidence level is a max. But, knowing my bike is crucial is staying healthy. I couldn't agree with you more.
 

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Times they are a changing.

The not so older generations progressed from mini-bikes to motorcycles.

Today they go from Wii Harley to a real bike.
 

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Amen, Stratowart, amen.
I am still an utter newb when it comes to riding, and feel far from confident on my bike. I ride side streets everyday on the way to and from work, and low-traffic big roads on weekends to get a feel for the bike and how I'll react to road conditions etc. I figure comfort will come with experience. I'm ATGATT, and an developing a real healthy sense of paranoia regarding everybody else on the road- I'm invisible, and everyone is out to get me.
Thanks for all the tips. Y'all teach me something purt' near everyday!:)
 

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Amen, Stratowart, amen.
I am still an utter newb when it comes to riding, and feel far from confident on my bike. I ride side streets everyday on the way to and from work, and low-traffic big roads on weekends to get a feel for the bike and how I'll react to road conditions etc. I figure comfort will come with experience. I'm ATGATT, and an developing a real healthy sense of paranoia regarding everybody else on the road- I'm invisible, and everyone is out to get me.
Thanks for all the tips. Y'all teach me something purt' near everyday!:)
Just a suggestion; find some skills classes in your area and take them ASAP. You may not want to wait to get a feel for how the bike will react based on road conditions and may want to get more of a feel for how a motorcycle works first.

In my view, you need to be pretty confident of your skill level operating a motorcycle and then go deal with changing conditions, pot holes, kids, cars, debris and everything else out there.

Anything you learn now, from a reactive standpoint is as likely to become a bad habit as a good skill.

FWIW, your comment that you are 'far from confident' on your scoot caught my attention so, that's where I am coming from.

Bad way to ride.
 

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Thanks Larry. I've take the basic riders course, and am looking into the advanced course, to see when it's offered around here. And of course, I constantly lurk on the forum, to glean what knowledge I can from you more experienced folks. As I said, I learn something everyday. Case in point; bike in gear, pointed at an escape route when stopped at a light is my SOP now. Got that from the safety tip thread, from Trauma Jim or Caliente Pocket(I think).
 

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Thanks Larry. I've take the basic riders course, and am looking into the advanced course, to see when it's offered around here. And of course, I constantly lurk on the forum, to glean what knowledge I can from you more experienced folks. As I said, I learn something everyday. Case in point; bike in gear, pointed at an escape route when stopped at a light is my SOP now. Got that from the safety tip thread, from Trauma Jim or Caliente Pocket(I think).
Look into these guys;

http://www.totalcontroltraining.net/HTML/Schedule.html

They've got a class coming up in Bradenton. I know that ain't exactly next door but, when we're talking motorcycle riding and skills, we are talking about your life.

As a noob, learning stuff here and there, my view, anyone's view, ain't a good way to fly compared to a comprehensive classroom/parking lot course with proper real life instruction. It is not good that you are uncomfortable when you ride. Huge red flag as far I am concerned. Good, confident, experienced riders get killed all the time.

I mean, it's good because you seem to be acknowledging you don't exactly know what you're doing so, if you take that and do something productive about it, then it's good.

Total Control, (I have no dog in this, I simply took their level I class a few years back) covers stuff in pretty damn good detail in TC I, well above and beyond MSF basic and intermediate classes, which you should take first anyway.

Frame of mind, mind set, hand eye coordination, physiology of sight (predator v. prey vision) and how all this applies to riding a motorcycle better. Add to that technique stuff like trail braking, friction zone, dragging rear break, all stuff you are familiar with but, maybe not in much depth, practical application in the parking lot sessions and so on, in addition to suspension stuff and making sure you fundamentally understand how and why a motorcycle works.

There is a WORLD of difference when it suddenly gets dicey out there and you KNOW what you are trying to do with the bike and whatever the 'issue' vs. trial and error and hoping you'll live long enough to get it. There were guys in one of my classes with 30-40,000 miles and years and years on motorcycles that simply didn't have the skills and understanding when they got there that morning that they left with at days end.

Riding a bike is fun as hell to begin with. Just wait until you've got a solid skill set and know what you are working on, every time you swing a leg. Then, it really comes, and helps keep you, alive.
 
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