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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I thought to post this solution, to make removing and installing our saddles easier, time and time again....

Go to Big Bike Parts.com and look for tapered seat bolts for the SVTC/Eluder and can fit the Honda ST1800 as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=YzE1bSycC5U

Also, as you pick up a set of those bolts, this rear tank bib to stop your pants from scuffing the back end outer edge/finish of your gas tank, as I see it, is a 'must have'. One of my 'Christmas presents' from my wife, this year. :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=fIkorNHchRQ

Post Edit comment. "Folks...we need to totally support Big Bike Parts (Hopnel), in that they didn't sit around and wait to see how the uptake of this great bike was....but stepped up to the plate and created many, many great 3rd Party acc's already. I also picked up the higher and wider, Tour windshield as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=yKAq9kydiFw

If they see orders coming in...they will keep producing, what is currently in their catalog...and be encouraged to add more for the SVTC/ELUDER ride. Please support them...as they have unconditionally supported current owners,--------> right out of the gate!" :)

Thank you, Big Bike Parts.com, you will be the first site I go to, for anything else on my 2018 Star Venture Transcontinental! Thank you, for supporting our great ride with not merely lip-speak...but dollars invested!
Cheers,
 

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I thought to post this solution, to make removing and installing our saddles easier, time and time again....

Go to Big Bike Parts.com and look for tapered seat bolts for the SVTC/Eluder and can fit the Honda ST1800 as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=YzE1bSycC5U

Also, as you pick up a set of those bolts, this rear tank bib to stop your pants from scuffing the back end outer edge/finish of your gas tank, as I see it, is a 'must have'. One of my 'Christmas presents' from my wife, this year. /forums/images/smilies/smile.gif

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=fIkorNHchRQ

Post Edit comment. "Folks...we need to totally support Big Bike Parts (Hopnel), in that they didn't sit around and wait to see how the uptake of this great bike was....but stepped up to the plate and created many, many great 3rd Party acc's already. I also picked up the higher and wider, Tour windshield as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=yKAq9kydiFw

If they see orders coming in...they will keep producing, what is currently in their catalog...and be encouraged to add more for the SVTC/ELUDER ride. Please support them...as they have unconditionally supported current owners,--------> right out of the gate!" /forums/images/smilies/smile.gif

Thank you, Big Bike Parts.com, you will be the first site I go to, for anything else on my 2018 Star Venture Transcontinental! Thank you, for supporting our great ride with not merely lip-speak...but dollars invested!
Cheers,
Hey Joe, NONE of those videos came up. Each one said there was an “error”.
Might wanna check it. 😉
 

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Links worked for me. In the past past I've taken a regular bolt over to the grinder and put a cone shape on the end. This works great on trying to get header bolts started in really tight areas. Just remember to run a nut on the bolt first so after you grind on it and take the nut off it cleans the thread.
 

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Thinking about it maybe Yamaha made removing the seat a benefit during oil changes.

My Victory the battery was in the front in a compartment at the bottom and you had to remove a grille panel to get to it.

My Harley Davidson the battery was in a compartment under the seat like the Yamaha Star Venture but you did not have to remove the seat to change the oil so the battery rarely got checked.

The Yamaha you see the battery every time you change the oil to check the terminals for corrosion and make sure the terminals are tight.

Some are under the impression you have to remove the seat to add oil if you are on the road but that is not true, all you have to do is add oil via the dip stick hole with a small funnel even those disposable thin cardboard funnels that you roll up into the size you need. So there is no need to remove the seat to add oil when on the road.

Saying that I have never had a need to add any oil to mine.
 

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Thinking about it maybe Yamaha made removing the seat a benefit during oil changes.

My Victory the battery was in the front in a compartment at the bottom and you had to remove a grille panel to get to it.

My Harley Davidson the battery was in a compartment under the seat like the Yamaha Star Venture but you did not have to remove the seat to change the oil so the battery rarely got checked.

The Yamaha you see the battery every time you change the oil to check the terminals for corrosion and make sure the terminals are tight.

Some are under the impression you have to remove the seat to add oil if you are on the road but that is not true, all you have to do is add oil via the dip stick hole with a small funnel even those disposable thin cardboard funnels that you roll up into the size you need. So there is no need to remove the seat to add oil when on the road.

Saying that I have never had a need to add any oil to mine.
Same here Bill regarding that last statement. I haven’t had to add any oil between oil changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thinking about it maybe Yamaha made removing the seat a benefit during oil changes.

My Victory the battery was in the front in a compartment at the bottom and you had to remove a grille panel to get to it.

My Harley Davidson the battery was in a compartment under the seat like the Yamaha Star Venture but you did not have to remove the seat to change the oil so the battery rarely got checked.

The Yamaha you see the battery every time you change the oil to check the terminals for corrosion and make sure the terminals are tight.

Some are under the impression you have to remove the seat to add oil if you are on the road but that is not true, all you have to do is add oil via the dip stick hole with a small funnel even those disposable thin cardboard funnels that you roll up into the size you need. So there is no need to remove the seat to add oil when on the road.

Saying that I have never had a need to add any oil to mine.
Same here, Bill. I have never had to add oil to this engine, between 5,000 mile oil changes. It simply doesn't burn any...and that was even on a trip from Toronto, to Phoenix, AZ, last August. This engine runs cool.
 

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Thinking about it maybe Yamaha made removing the seat a benefit during oil changes.

My Victory the battery was in the front in a compartment at the bottom and you had to remove a grille panel to get to it.

My Harley Davidson the battery was in a compartment under the seat like the Yamaha Star Venture but you did not have to remove the seat to change the oil so the battery rarely got checked.

The Yamaha you see the battery every time you change the oil to check the terminals for corrosion and make sure the terminals are tight.

Some are under the impression you have to remove the seat to add oil if you are on the road but that is not true, all you have to do is add oil via the dip stick hole with a small funnel even those disposable thin cardboard funnels that you roll up into the size you need. So there is no need to remove the seat to add oil when on the road.

Saying that I have never had a need to add any oil to mine.
Same here, Bill. I have never had add oil to this engine, between 5,000 mile oil changes. It simply doesn't burn any...and that was even on a trip from Toronto, to Phoenix, AZ, last August. This engine runs cool.
I noticed you said “5,000” mile oil change, yet Yamaha specifies every 4,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I noticed you said “5,000” mile oil change, yet Yamaha specifies every 4,000 miles.
Right...but because I use premium synthetic, easily, with mostly highway riding, you can get another 1000 out of the oil. I do my cars at 5,000 miles (synthetic) and my bikes as well, Tony. Filters are always swapped out per oil change.

For mineral oil...yes, I'd do actually 3000 mile oil changes.
 

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Some are under the impression you have to remove the seat to add oil if you are on the road but that is not true, all you have to do is add oil via the dip stick hole with a small funnel even those disposable thin cardboard funnels that you roll up into the size you need. So there is no need to remove the seat to add oil when on the road.

Saying that I have never had a need to add any oil to mine.
I would add the oil to the crankcase. That seems to me to be easier than trying to fill it with the dipstick hole.
 

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I noticed you said “5,000” mile oil change, yet Yamaha specifies every 4,000 miles.
Right...but because I use premium synthetic, easily, with mostly highway riding, you can get another 1000 out of the oil. I do my cars at 5,000 miles (synthetic) and my bikes as well, Tony. Filters are always swapped out per oil change.

For mineral oil...yes, I'd do actually 3000 mile oil changes.
What your saying makes complete sense but I won’t give Yamaha any leg to stand on. If they say 4K then I’m doing 4K.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
What your saying makes complete sense but I won’t give Yamaha any leg to stand on. If they say 4K then I’m doing 4K.
Of course, but being that just purchasing 6 liters of Yama Mamma 15W50 in Ontario is 18.97 a liter...you can be da*n sure, that I am going to squeeze out 20 % more miles between 'bend over the barrel and smile' $130.00 (with filter) oil changes. First off, Yamaha can't tell between oil changes if you go 4,000 or 5,000 miles between, Tony. As long as you show sales receipts dates for oil purchase that DIVIDES 4,000 into your gross mileage. It only means that you will have 6-12 bottles hanging around, that takes you past the warranty coverage, that can be used after that time, with whatever mileage interval you want. That's what I'm doing...take your yearly average mileage (like from last riding season, and divide by 4,000.) Buy oil..get sales receipt, and store with paperwork. No sweat..."Bond...James Bond...and I like my Martini, stirred, not shaken..."
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I would add the oil to the crankcase. That seems to me to be easier than trying to fill it with the dipstick hole.
You would NOT want to do that, for there is a critical amount, in the two section crankcase, that is metered and maintained by the regulated oil pump flow. If you do what you are saying you'd do...you can easily overfill, that sensitive area...bubble/aerate your oil with the crank weights slapping through it...and worse yet, blow seals, as too much hydrostatic pressure might build up...

Putting it where it should go anyways...in the outboard tank...via the dipstick tube...would cause none of the above...for that's where adding oil is suppose to go. I have already thought about it...and have a large plastic medical syringe with a length of hose, 1/2 inch longer than the metal dip stick shaft, itself. Then, all I have to do...is slip the tube into an open liter bottle, I can see how much I am sucking up and measured into the syringe body...and then...when putting the length of the hose down into the dip stick tube diameter...I KNOW it is below the surface of the oil already there, and won't back flow, and once removed, will allow me an accurate dip of the stick. Already have that ready... Funnels can be messy, your hands get messy...but with my method...clean, can be measured, and 'power injected', not waiting around for the oil to drip down from the funnel....and hassle free. The thing is....not once, had I had to use my 'oil injector/adder'. Yamaha knows their stuff, on piston rings and ceramic coated cylinder walls!

BTW...about that ceramic coating... five times stronger on a molecular level, than stainless steel. That's why ceramic bladed knives are all the new rage...they last, sharp...(if you're not stupid about what you cut...) seemingly forever. I own two..and won't be looking back. Bye-Bye, stainless steel...(in the kitchen that is...) So...thank you Yamaha for coating my cylinder walls with the stuff....and the piston rings hone that coating to a razor shine... ;)

Love this engine...yeppers!

JUST GIVE ME THE DANG software update....jeez!
 

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This is my first v twin with a seperate oil tank. Does the tank supply the engine and the crankcase supply the tranny? Are they completly seperate? I ask because if they do not mix then Yamaha needs to correct their manuals. I believe the owners manual says 2 quarts in the crankcase and remainder in the tank. The service manual says that it is 2.4 in crankcase and remainder in tank.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
This is my first v twin with a seperate oil tank. Does the tank supply the engine and the crankcase supply the tranny? Are they completly seperate? I ask because if they do not mix then Yamaha needs to correct their manuals. I believe the owners manual says 2 quarts in the crankcase and remainder in the tank. The service manual says that it is 2.4 in crankcase and remainder in tank.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
The tank supplies engine oil to both physical compartments, the crankcase, and the transmission housing. Why you need to put fresh oil into BOTH the actual engine crankcase as well as the Outboard Oil Reserve Tank, is because this engine is a semi-dry sump engine. That means that while there actually IS a pool/reservoir of oil in the bottom of the engine, there is not enough there, when drained, to be ample to lubricate the crank and valve gear, as well as the transmission at first post oil change, startup. The oil pump needs time to amply fill those areas...so you are in fact actually PRIMING those areas, so there IS oil, at first start up. So, you need to replace what little amount does retain in the crankcase when you turn off the engine, and the oil pump is no longer actively moving oil around the engine oil pathway, under pressure. That solely is the reason for the crank case plug you drop oil into.

The actual pathway is this:

Oil from the oil tank is put under pressure from the oil pump near the bottom of the tank, into the oil delivery line, and it travels to the crankcase semi-dry oil sump, and the transmission case. From there, the scavenger (the oil pump that DRAWS oil out of those two areas...within the engine) moves the oil on the outbound oil line to the top of the oil cooler at the front of the engine, between the forks. From there, having dropped through all the rows and channels of the oil cooler, it flows all the way back to the top of the outboard engine oil tank (always under active line pressure)...and is again picked up by the feeding oil pump at the bottom, with the oil molecules having time to shed even more engine heat through a 'rest' residency in the tank, to complete another circuit. That is why your oil, is a very important and integral COOLING medium, Rob...for as both our 2008 Goldwings only had hot oil drop down into the large sump (still hot...and not having a chance to leave the very hot engine environment) our SVTC engine oil molecules have quite a long journey ***,while out and away from the engine entirely!***....engine--->outbound oil line (metal...giving off heat)---->through all the fins of the oil cooler, with ambient cold air pouring over and through the fins--->back...into another cooling return oil line....also always in the ambient cooling airflow around the bike---->and then that ambient temperature cooled, engine oil plops back at the top into the oil tank which is itself is under constant cooling air flow movement...and then at the bottom those 'for example' oil molecules....start their journey once more around the entire circuit. So, Rob...our bikes are AIR/OIL cooled...and when you think about it...when you truly think about it...our bikes are actually 'liquid' cooled, enhancing the direct cooling action of the cylinder fins......but with a higher viscosity 'cooling' element...that of oil...rather than water.

Truly, our bikes use a viscous element/'liquid' to cool, as much as the ambient air drawing across the cooling fins of the engine. You have a semi-dry, outboard tanked, engine oil, system...so don't let anybody ***EVER*** tell you that your SVTC is not...also...a 'liquid' cooled engine. It sure is! Just not water, in water jackets...but oil in a very long distance travel path oil line, to the oil cooler, and then to finally the separate oil tank away from the very hot engine sump (as was ***NOT*** happening, in our Goldwings...).

Cheers,
 

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This is my first v twin with a seperate oil tank. Does the tank supply the engine and the crankcase supply the tranny? Are they completly seperate? I ask because if they do not mix then Yamaha needs to correct their manuals. I believe the owners manual says 2 quarts in the crankcase and remainder in the tank. The service manual says that it is 2.4 in crankcase and remainder in tank.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
The tank supplies engine oil to both physical compartments, the crankcase, and the transmission housing. Why you need to put fresh oil into BOTH the actual engine crankcase as well as the Outboard Oil Reserve Tank, is because this engine is a semi-dry sump engine. That means that while there actually IS a pool/reservoir of oil in the bottom of the engine, there is not enough there, when drained, to be ample to lubricate the crank and valve gear, as well as the transmission at first post oil change, startup. The oil pump needs time to amply fill those areas...so you are in fact actually PRIMING those areas, so there IS oil, at first start up. So, you need to replace what little amount does retain in the crankcase when you turn off the engine, and the oil pump is no longer actively moving oil around the engine oil pathway, under pressure. That solely is the reason for the crank case plug you drop oil into.

The actual pathway is this:

Oil from the oil tank is put under pressure from the oil pump near the bottom of the tank, into the oil delivery line, and it travels to the crankcase semi-dry oil sump, and the transmission case. From there, the scavenger (the oil pump that DRAWS oil out of those two areas...within the engine) moves the oil on the outbound oil line to the top of the oil cooler at the front of the engine, between the forks. From there, having dropped through all the rows and channels of the oil cooler, it flows all the way back to the top of the outboard engine oil tank (always under active line pressure)...and is again picked up by the feeding oil pump at the bottom, with the oil molecules having time to shed even more engine heat through a 'rest' residency in the tank, to complete another circuit. That is why your oil, is a very important and integral COOLING medium, Rob...for as both our 2008 Goldwings only had hot oil drop down into the large sump (still hot...and not having a chance to leave the very hot engine environment) our SVTC engine oil molecules have quite a long journey ***,while out and away from the engine entirely!***....engine--->outbound oil line (metal...giving off heat)---->through all the fins of the oil cooler, with ambient cold air pouring over and through the fins--->back...into another cooling return oil line....also always in the ambient cooling airflow around the bike---->and then that ambient temperature cooled, engine oil plops back at the top into the oil tank which is itself is under constant cooling air flow movement...and then at the bottom those 'for example' oil molecules....start their journey once more around the entire circuit. So, Rob...our bikes are AIR/OIL cooled...and when you think about it...when you truly think about it...our bikes are actually 'liquid' cooled, enhancing the direct cooling action of the cylinder fins......but with a higher viscosity 'cooling' element...that of oil...rather than water.

Truly, our bikes use a viscous element/'liquid' to cool, as much as the ambient air drawing across the cooling fins of the engine. You have a semi-dry, outboard tanked, engine oil, system...so don't let anybody ***EVER*** tell you that your SVTC is not...also...a 'liquid' cooled engine. It sure is! Just not water, in water jackets...but oil in a very long distance travel path oil line, to the oil cooler, and then to finally the separate oil tank away from the very hot engine sump (as was ***NOT*** happening, in our Goldwings...).

Cheers,
Great point Joe. BRAVO! (Hands clapping)
 

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I would add the oil to the crankcase. That seems to me to be easier than trying to fill it with the dipstick hole.
You would NOT want to do that, for there is a critical amount, in the two section crankcase, that is metered and maintained by the regulated oil pump flow. If you do what you are saying you'd do...you can easily overfill, that sensitive area...bubble/aerate your oil with the crank weights slapping through it...and worse yet, blow seals, as too much hydrostatic pressure might build up...

Putting it where it should go anyways...in the outboard tank...via the dipstick tube...would cause none of the above...for that's where adding oil is suppose to go. I have already thought about it...and have a large plastic medical syringe with a length of hose, 1/2 inch longer than the metal dip stick shaft, itself. Then, all I have to do...is slip the tube into an open liter bottle, I can see how much I am sucking up and measured into the syringe body...and then...when putting the length of the hose down into the dip stick tube diameter...I KNOW it is below the surface of the oil already there, and won't back flow, and once removed, will allow me an accurate dip of the stick. Already have that ready... Funnels can be messy, your hands get messy...but with my method...clean, can be measured, and 'power injected', not waiting around for the oil to drip down from the funnel....and hassle free. The thing is....not once, had I had to use my 'oil injector/adder'. Yamaha knows their stuff, on piston rings and ceramic coated cylinder walls!

BTW...about that ceramic coating... five times stronger on a molecular level, than stainless steel. That's why ceramic bladed knives are all the new rage...they last, sharp...(if you're not stupid about what you cut...) seemingly forever. I own two..and won't be looking back. Bye-Bye, stainless steel...(in the kitchen that is...) So...thank you Yamaha for coating my cylinder walls with the stuff....and the piston rings hone that coating to a razor shine... ;)

Love this engine...yeppers!

JUST GIVE ME THE DANG software update....jeez!
This is my first v twin with a seperate oil tank. Does the tank supply the engine and the crankcase supply the tranny? Are they completly seperate? I ask because if they do not mix then Yamaha needs to correct their manuals. I believe the owners manual says 2 quarts in the crankcase and remainder in the tank. The service manual says that it is 2.4 in crankcase and remainder in tank.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
The tank supplies engine oil to both physical compartments, the crankcase, and the transmission housing. Why you need to put fresh oil into BOTH the actual engine crankcase as well as the Outboard Oil Reserve Tank, is because this engine is a semi-dry sump engine. That means that while there actually IS a pool/reservoir of oil in the bottom of the engine, there is not enough there, when drained, to be ample to lubricate the crank and valve gear, as well as the transmission at first post oil change, startup. The oil pump needs time to amply fill those areas...so you are in fact actually PRIMING those areas, so there IS oil, at first start up. So, you need to replace what little amount does retain in the crankcase when you turn off the engine, and the oil pump is no longer actively moving oil around the engine oil pathway, under pressure. That solely is the reason for the crank case plug you drop oil into.

The actual pathway is this:

Oil from the oil tank is put under pressure from the oil pump near the bottom of the tank, into the oil delivery line, and it travels to the crankcase semi-dry oil sump, and the transmission case. From there, the scavenger (the oil pump that DRAWS oil out of those two areas...within the engine) moves the oil on the outbound oil line to the top of the oil cooler at the front of the engine, between the forks. From there, having dropped through all the rows and channels of the oil cooler, it flows all the way back to the top of the outboard engine oil tank (always under active line pressure)...and is again picked up by the feeding oil pump at the bottom, with the oil molecules having time to shed even more engine heat through a 'rest' residency in the tank, to complete another circuit. That is why your oil, is a very important and integral COOLING medium, Rob...for as both our 2008 Goldwings only had hot oil drop down into the large sump (still hot...and not having a chance to leave the very hot engine environment) our SVTC engine oil molecules have quite a long journey ***,while out and away from the engine entirely!***....engine--->outbound oil line (metal...giving off heat)---->through all the fins of the oil cooler, with ambient cold air pouring over and through the fins--->back...into another cooling return oil line....also always in the ambient cooling airflow around the bike---->and then that ambient temperature cooled, engine oil plops back at the top into the oil tank which is itself is under constant cooling air flow movement...and then at the bottom those 'for example' oil molecules....start their journey once more around the entire circuit. So, Rob...our bikes are AIR/OIL cooled...and when you think about it...when you truly think about it...our bikes are actually 'liquid' cooled, enhancing the direct cooling action of the cylinder fins......but with a higher viscosity 'cooling' element...that of oil...rather than water.

Truly, our bikes use a viscous element/'liquid' to cool, as much as the ambient air drawing across the cooling fins of the engine. You have a semi-dry, outboard tanked, engine oil, system...so don't let anybody ***EVER*** tell you that your SVTC is not...also...a 'liquid' cooled engine. It sure is! Just not water, in water jackets...but oil in a very long distance travel path oil line, to the oil cooler, and then to finally the separate oil tank away from the very hot engine sump (as was ***NOT*** happening, in our Goldwings...).

Cheers,
Eagerly following along here and learning as I go, I have a couple questions Mr. Excellence. First, in an effort to help us learn, would it be possible for either you or one of the other knowledgeable SVTC owners to answer the specifics of Bucfans second posted questions above?
And then, in reading thru this, it almost sounds like Bucfan, in following what the manual states in NOT using the exterior oil tank to refill the crankcase but refilling it manually is actually the proper way to do an oil change and, in some way, if I am reading your response correctly Mr. Excellence, you are verifying this.. It almost sounds like the bike was designed to have to actually access more than one area for oil refill points.. I am confused..:eek:
 

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The tank supplies engine oil to both physical compartments, the crankcase, and the transmission housing. Why you need to put fresh oil into BOTH the actual engine crankcase as well as the Outboard Oil Reserve Tank, is because this engine is a semi-dry sump engine. That means that while there actually IS a pool/reservoir of oil in the bottom of the engine, there is not enough there, when drained, to be ample to lubricate the crank and valve gear, as well as the transmission at first post oil change, startup. The oil pump needs time to amply fill those areas...so you are in fact actually PRIMING those areas, so there IS oil, at first start up. So, you need to replace what little amount does retain in the crankcase when you turn off the engine, and the oil pump is no longer actively moving oil around the engine oil pathway, under pressure. That solely is the reason for the crank case plug you drop oil into.

The actual pathway is this:

Oil from the oil tank is put under pressure from the oil pump near the bottom of the tank, into the oil delivery line, and it travels to the crankcase semi-dry oil sump, and the transmission case. From there, the scavenger (the oil pump that DRAWS oil out of those two areas...within the engine) moves the oil on the outbound oil line to the top of the oil cooler at the front of the engine, between the forks. From there, having dropped through all the rows and channels of the oil cooler, it flows all the way back to the top of the outboard engine oil tank (always under active line pressure)...and is again picked up by the feeding oil pump at the bottom, with the oil molecules having time to shed even more engine heat through a 'rest' residency in the tank, to complete another circuit. That is why your oil, is a very important and integral COOLING medium, Rob...for as both our 2008 Goldwings only had hot oil drop down into the large sump (still hot...and not having a chance to leave the very hot engine environment) our SVTC engine oil molecules have quite a long journey ***,while out and away from the engine entirely!***....engine--->outbound oil line (metal...giving off heat)---->through all the fins of the oil cooler, with ambient cold air pouring over and through the fins--->back...into another cooling return oil line....also always in the ambient cooling airflow around the bike---->and then that ambient temperature cooled, engine oil plops back at the top into the oil tank which is itself is under constant cooling air flow movement...and then at the bottom those 'for example' oil molecules....start their journey once more around the entire circuit. So, Rob...our bikes are AIR/OIL cooled...and when you think about it...when you truly think about it...our bikes are actually 'liquid' cooled, enhancing the direct cooling action of the cylinder fins......but with a higher viscosity 'cooling' element...that of oil...rather than water.

Truly, our bikes use a viscous element/'liquid' to cool, as much as the ambient air drawing across the cooling fins of the engine. You have a semi-dry, outboard tanked, engine oil, system...so don't let anybody ***EVER*** tell you that your SVTC is not...also...a 'liquid' cooled engine. It sure is! Just not water, in water jackets...but oil in a very long distance travel path oil line, to the oil cooler, and then to finally the separate oil tank away from the very hot engine sump (as was ***NOT*** happening, in our Goldwings...).

Cheers,
Thanks for the response. Would not the system you describe be self leveling? Is I add 8 Oz to the crankcase case would not it be pumped into the tank?

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Thanks for the response. Would not the system you describe be self leveling? Is I add 8 Oz to the crankcase case would not it be pumped into the tank?

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk

Yes it would, Rob..as what is in the engine get sucked out via the Scavenger Oil Pump...BUT...it is NOT immediate. There can still be plenty of time to put too much pressure on seals and a damaging build up of hydrostatic pressure. Remember...the very non-compliance of oil, that lifts massive weight of lifts can work also in your engine cases! You don't want that...that's why you never overfill a Goldwing true-wet sump crankcase. You can actually BEND, crank shafts that are slamming into non-compliant oil surfaces...that don't give...even under fantastic pressure...

So...as American has time and time cautioned...and he is absolutely on the technical 'money'...MEASURE carefully, what the manual, or Bill has posted....and ONLY put that into your crank case portal. The other measurement into your Oil Tank is only to prevent overflow and blow back when filling the oil level required in the tank. The MOST important regarding of how much oil...is that which goes into the crankcase oil port. Follow exactly what he posted...and I'll give you a fail-safe tip.

Clean out two windshield washer jugs...., and label one in black magic marker...SVTC Crankcase oil replacement. The other...SVTC Outboard Oil Tank.

Now...as to Bill's posting, where he exactly gives the volume for each location....carefully measure out...and then for instance, measure the amount for the crankcase portal. Pour it into the jug you labelled for that purpose. Put it on a flat table top...and let it settle down. Then...using a ruler and magic marker...note the level of the oil in the jug. Make a mark at the very top of the oil level. Now...easy-peasy. You don't NEED to measure ever again....the next oil change, you merely take your quart or jug of oil....and pour an amount up to your outside level line DONE....Done...now pour that into your Crankcase Portal. Done...

Now pour your other marked and filled to the line, Outboard Oil Tank jug....DONE...DONE...close all covers...start the bike...let it run for 7 minutes at idle, then bring the bike up level...wait three minutes with the engine off...take a reading...and adjust if necessary. You most likely will NOT have to add a drop doing my method. For my SVTC oil changes, it is brainless....I pull down my two jugs. I fill each to the line I made. I make sure the jug I have in my hand is where I intend the contents to go...pour it in...and the most favorite four letter word I like around the shop gets mentioned------>DONE! Now the next four letter word...RIDE! :)

Cheers,

Joe
 
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