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Discussion Starter #1
So, i recently got my 2009 vstar 650 custom back in November. The previous owner seemed meticulous about the fit and finish, but I suspected he wasn't so obsessive about the engine (4k miles, so it's still in good shape).

With that in mind, how often should I clean the carburetor? What is the best way to do it?

Also, there is some minor bluing on the front exhaust pipe. The previous owner, who bought the bike new, said this bluing only began within the past year. Could this also be related to a dirty carburetor? Perhaps a gunked up carburetor is not adding enough fuel to the air/fuel mixture, making the bike run a little on the lean side?

Thanks!
 

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If it runs and idles smoothly you shouldn't need disassembly to clean. Just run some StarTron fuel system cleaner. StarTron is formulated to clean alcohol fuel residue. That being said these bikes are set up pretty lean from the factory. Have the pipes been changed and /or modified? Has the intake side been changed and/or modified? Changes to either can affect the fuel mixture.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I forgot to include that part...the pipes and air cleaner are both stock. Actually, everything is stock on the bike. So if it still runs relatively well, would that mean I may need a rejetting considering the bluing?

And, running some fuel cleaner through it is really all it takes? I will track down some StarTron or other fuel cleaner in the mean time...
 

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If it runs and idles smoothly you shouldn't need disassembly to clean. Just run some StarTron fuel system cleaner. StarTron is formulated to clean alcohol fuel residue. That being said these bikes are set up pretty lean from the factory. Have the pipes been changed and /or modified? Has the intake side been changed and/or modified? Changes to either can affect the fuel mixture.
+1 on not disassembling the carb unless there is a specific problem that requires it. Keep a clean air filter, keep a clean fuel filter and use fuel from a reliable station and the necessity of carb cleaning will be minimized. Fuel treatments will take care of any cleaning otherwise.
 

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I used the Berrymans Chemtool with great success. Just add to the fuel in the tank and ride. Cleans very well. You need to check all of the following :
Air filter condition, Properly installed air box, Rubber boot connections to both carbs tight and sealed, fuel filter, Condition of tank inside.
Also the carbs may need to be synced.

As stated by other members the intake is touchy and if the intake and exhaust are stock any little thing not connected correctly or dirty
fuel system can cause a lean condition to blue pipes.

Excessively hot exhaust pipes indicate a lean condition exist.

Good luck and report back what you find.

jake:)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help! I'll go down the list and check all of those things. According to the manual, at least some of those things are due for a replacement anyway. It looks like my bike and I will have some bonding time soon.
 

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You will find removing the gas tank to be a daunting task when full of fuel. Best to run it down to about 1/4 tank or less before removal.
Removal of the rear carbs fuel line in addition to an extension hose
will route fuel to a gas can nicely.

Some of the rubber intake parts are a bit tricky to get them seated correctly when tightening them up. AS you will see when you get in there. Also check your carb to intake manifold boot upper connections.
These are very prone to becoming dislodged or leaky.
The band clamps should be fairly tight. Carbs fully seated.

Just starting here and getting past this point will dictate what to look for next if nothing pops up it's ugly head .

jake ;)
 
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