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Discussion Starter #1
What is the clunking noise when you switch off the engine? My starter clutch is going or has gone out. Would it be the culprit? I am at a loss. '02 V-Star 1100 custom.
 

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The 1100 does have some known starter/starter clutch issues, especially the pre-03 models. There is some little clunk on shutting it down that can be considered normal. Ensuring you have fairly fresh, good quality oil, 1/3-1/2 halfway up the sightglass can help a little. Letting it return to an idle before killing it will help also.
The biggest is using the proper starting method on it, which is more in depth than just hitting the key and twisting it on down the road unfortunately. More than happy to post the process if you are not familiar with it, but don't want to waste your eyes if you are using it.

A quick check is to look at your starter body bolts. Make sure that the long skinny that run the length of the starter are still straight and not twisted. You can use a straight edge of some sort to tell if the back/butt of the starter is clocked different than the head of it. This will let you know if the starter has been taking a beating and not far from going or you need to look in to the starter clutch for replacement.

Think that the TPS acts similar to adjusting the timing on an old car by turning the distributor. Little too advanced or retarded and it can give some wonky actions.

The 03 and later addressed part of the torque kick back issue by slightly changing the design of the starter and allowing it to better handle the kickback when you started and shut down the bike.
 

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What is the clunking noise when you switch off the engine? My starter clutch is going or has gone out. Would it be the culprit? I am at a loss. '02 V-Star 1100 custom.
For what it's worth, my limited ownership of a 2004 1100 has shown that during shutdown there will be a clunk. I have yet to hear from my lil bro, the recipient of my previously owned 1100, that there's an issue with the 1100's starter clutch but I have experienced many different makes and models of bikes that had their own certain idiosyncracies not exhibited by others so for now I would say that the 'clunk' is an 1100 thang.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The 1100 does have some known starter/starter clutch issues, especially the pre-03 models. There is some little clunk on shutting it down that can be considered normal. Ensuring you have fairly fresh, good quality oil, 1/3-1/2 halfway up the sightglass can help a little. Letting it return to an idle before killing it will help also.
The biggest is using the proper starting method on it, which is more in depth than just hitting the key and twisting it on down the road unfortunately. More than happy to post the process if you are not familiar with it, but don't want to waste your eyes if you are using it.

A quick check is to look at your starter body bolts. Make sure that the long skinny that run the length of the starter are still straight and not twisted. You can use a straight edge of some sort to tell if the back/butt of the starter is clocked different than the head of it. This will let you know if the starter has been taking a beating and not far from going or you need to look in to the starter clutch for replacement.

Think that the TPS acts similar to adjusting the timing on an old car by turning the distributor. Little too advanced or retarded and it can give some wonky actions.

The 03 and later addressed part of the torque kick back issue by slightly changing the design of the starter and allowing it to better handle the kickback when you started and shut down the bike.[/QUOTE
Yes pleas explain proper procedures for starting. I thought I was doing everything right, but not certain.
 

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Thanks Les on posting that one.

To add to the not using the throttle due to the starting circuits and all;

Key and kill switch to the On position (obviously haha)
Place the bike in 2nd gear and roll the bike backward until the gear fully engages/stops rolling with your hand off of the clutch lever.
Choke adjusted as needed
Shift to neutral
Press the starter button until the bike is running (up to 20 seconds)
Adjust Choke as necessary to let it warm up.

I picked this up from a forum member (Flush You Bastard) a while back, with the explanation "This motion engages the sprags in the sprag (starter) clutch. So doing it in advance like this should help it to "catch" the motor crank and turn it to get it started."

The starter clutch is a sprag style/one way bearing, not a clutch pack or disc as one would think or even the common bendix set up that most automobile's use.

From the TSB about starter clutch replacement in regards to throttling while starting "...if the throttle is applied while cranking the engine, an extremely lean fuel mixture is created. This lean condition is very volatile and can result in very abrupt combustion causing the engine to rotate backwards violently, damaging the starter one-way bearing and possibly other starter system components. "

The cost for dealer parts is a little up there ($500 and up for the bearing assembly plus shop time to install), which, to me, is a little high when you paid 2 grand for the bike itself. You can pick up an upgraded assembly for cheaper and do it yourself. It isn't a hard job, if you have patience. It is very easy to get the cams out of time while replacing the starter clutch if you aren't paying attention or get in a hurry. So, the few seconds it takes me to put it in 2nd while I am already rolling backwards out of the garage is worth it if it will save me from having to replace the bearing again.

This is all planning for worst case scenario of course and the bike does have it's own set of noises, as was pointed out, such as if you stop hearing the valves tick, then it is time to adjust them again haha. Do your normal maintenance items, get your PMS screws set, sync your carbs, check your TPS and the bike should fire quick and easy and run strong for a long time. If you are still a little iffy on the noise, see if anyone in the area has an 1100 that you could meet up with and listen to and compare noises.
 

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my 650 makes a clunk sometimes when I hit the kill switch.

37,000 miles on the bike and it runs and starts just fine, so I dont give it a second thought. I have no idea what it is.
 
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