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I once told my daughter when she was little that if she didn’t behave, the next time we’d go out to dinner, all’s she’d get was a glass of diet water and a toothpick.
She had that puzzled look on her face then said, daddy diet water doesn’t taste good! It was a priceless moment.


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Sending people for stuff is a very Navy thing...on ship you always send newbies for stuff I.E. shore line, flight line, water line , prop wash , but the best was we sent a guy to medical for 3 feet of fallopian tube ......he was not happy when he was schooled in anatomy. 👩‍🍳
I worked maintenance at a hotel. My boss war a career Navy man.
He sent my coworker to the hardware store for 35 feet of Chow Line.
(Yeah, the kid wasn't the brightest crayon in the box).
 

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Since we're talking maintenance, how often do you check the tension on the Piston Return Springs?
 

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On a more serious note, I have a 10 year old SUV sitting in my driveway that I bought new in 2009.
It has never had the coolant changed.

I think changing coolant frequently is an urban legend that came from the coolant industry.
Most of you folks can remember when we were young chaps we were told that you should flush and fill your coolant every year.
Then around the late 70's or early 80's one of the major coolant producers' plant was destroyed in an explosion and suddenly there was a coolant shortage.
It was then that we were told the truth that you really didn't have to change the coolant every year. How convenient was that?

Test it every fall to be sure it is the proper mixture.
When I had to change the water pump on my Grand Prix I looked for videos on YouTube, as I always do the first time I repair or replace something on a vehicle. I'm not a professional wrench turner so I like to get an idea what I'm getting into, if I need any specific tools, or if there's anything unexpected I might run into. I find it an invaluable tool. Anyway, I was watching a video of a professional changing a water pump on a car like mine and when he pulled the old one off there was some sludge in it. It was an 07 and a car that age is going to have some but this was more than usual so he took the rad cap off to have a look. What was in the radiator looked like a mix of sand and clay. He pushed a screwdriver into it and it stood straight up. So while I believe manufacturers may recommend doing it more than necessary, I think checking and changing your coolant occasionally might be a good idea. And around here in colder temps it's necessary to make sure it will still remain liquid in sub zero temps.
 

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Most people understand the cooling, lowering freezing point and rising the boiling point of antifreeze. These properties of antifreeze deterioration over time, so changing it maintains these benefits. There's another benefit on antifreeze, it's a cleaner. Engine blocks are made from a sand casting process which some of the sand casting material is left on the inside of internal cavities. With the heat cycles of an engine the casting sand breaks off and is circulated throughout the cooling system. This slurry will sand blast the block from the inside out. If you take a radiator, reach inside where the lower hose attaches, reach in with finger and feel the bottom of radiator you can feel this sand slurry. On some engines it's not much, on others it's a lot. This slurry can attach itself around cylinder liners causing internal hot spots. When rebuilding engines I will reach into block with a pressure washer where freeze plugs are and break up all this slurry out to achieve even engine cooling. On newer engines the casting remains are not a big issue but on old iron engines it can be. You can see in the video below how much sand pours out on engine when tilted, they don't get it all out, a good reason to flush and change coolant at recommended times.

 

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Discussion Starter #27
Most people understand the cooling, lowering freezing point and rising the boiling point of antifreeze. These properties of antifreeze deterioration over time, so changing it maintains these benefits. There's another benefit on antifreeze, it's a cleaner. Engine blocks are made from a sand casting process which some of the sand casting material is left on the inside of internal cavities. With the heat cycles of an engine the casting sand breaks off and is circulated throughout the cooling system. This slurry will sand blast the block from the inside out. If you take a radiator, reach inside where the lower hose attaches, reach in with finger and feel the bottom of radiator you can feel this sand slurry. On some engines it's not much, on others it's a lot. This slurry can attach itself around cylinder liners causing internal hot spots. When rebuilding engines I will reach into block with a pressure washer where freeze plugs are and break up all this slurry out to achieve even engine cooling. On newer engines the casting remains are not a big issue but on old iron engines it can be. You can see in the video below how much sand pours out on engine when tilted, they don't get it all out, a good reason to flush and change coolant at recommended times.

I plan on doing a 50/50 of white distilled vinegar and distilled water after I drain the fluid. Drive it around the block then dump. Then just straight distilled water drive it around to flush the vinegar out then add my antifreeze. White vinegar is a lot less aggressive as the flushes out there. Figure that would get the sludge out if there is any.
 
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