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there was a thread on this and a good youtube video link

on a cruiser bike (all our Vstar bikes) you cannot get the bike to lean even 45° from vertical

there is a lot of physics involved, but that means the bike will not slide out on you

so you can be confident and lean it all the way till it scrapes, and even on wet pavement the tires will stay hooked up and not slip out

once the floorboards hit you do have to back off, because the next thing will be the frame, and that will make the bike side out.

Also when the floorboards start to scrape you can stop it and stand the bike up a bit by shifting your weight to the inside of the turn.

Ive never scraped either of my bikes - the roads where I live normally you cannot see all the way thru the curves - so if you are going fast enough to scrape you are riding well beyond your ability to stop or avoid something ahead that you cannot yet see.

Edit: If you want to play around with scraping the floorboards at lower speeds, instead of leaning your body weight to the inside of the curve, lean to the outside - that will make the bike lean in even more, you will be going slower, and you can lean in to stop the scrape if you freak out.
 

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Not a fan of scraping but I know of others who have no issue with it. I just do not feel the risk is worth it. All it takes is one little grab or slip and you could be sliding across the road, have the bike jump into another lane among other things...
 

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Wow, I think it's fun to scrap the floor boards in the twisties. Makes you feel alive! Of course, you have to not go too far but they fold up for that reason. There are some freeway entrances where it's hard not to scrape as you're getting on and getting up to speed to blend with the traffic but on the lonesome roads where you're comfortable with the curves, it's fun.
 

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if you are afraid of the idea of your floorboards scraping, with the bike on the kickstand and the front wheel straight, take a wooden board and hold it out from under the bike, with one end touching the ground at the centerline between the front and rear tire

and the other end perpendicular to that line and under the floorboard.

Raise the outside end up till it touches the floorboard - that is where it will scrape if you lean the bike that far

then raise the board up until the floorboard no longer has any give - that is how much further you can lean after it starts to scrape before you hit something that will not give - that is the point at which the "frame" hits the pavement and the bike will slide out on the frame.

If you have a crash bar, keep that in visual line with the board, and make sure your crash bar wont hit before the floorboard range of movement.
 

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you probably have a greater chance of getting attacked by a shark...while riding your bike.

https://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/49-v-star/31417-scraping-floorboards.html
I guess I will be awaiting the land shark to get me then. I am sure it provides some kind of rush but not for me. I understand the floor board is hinged but I just do not feel the risk is worth it since you are relying on your feet for certain controls on the bike. To upset that relationship is not something I would want to do voluntarily. But like most things in life...to each their own.. The idea of returning to where you departed from is always my primary goal. If I want to send sparks flying I will get my grinder working on some iron.. Stay safe!
 

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Redbird, I agree 100% about farting around with scraping

Its good to practice panic stopping and swerving around points in the road everyday when there is no one behind you, so you have a well developed reflex to avoid accidents

practicing turning to the point of just starting to scrape, and then backing off is also good. When you need to execute the escape path in traffic, or to miss a deer, you need to know the limit,

or you will be one of those guys saying "A deer jumped out, and I had to lay it down" because he leaned it too far onto the frame.
 

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I worry about deer around here more than anything. Especially on my way home from work at 11pm. The good news is i am only going 40mph. I have heard if you are going to hit one hit the center. I don't know if that is a great idea but at lower speeds it may be a functional idea.
Any thoughts?
 

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I do practice in parking lots especially since the riding season where I am from is relatively short in comparison to some other areas of the country. It does my confidence good to shake off the rust after long periods of not riding. I am just not one to lean it over during cornering to the point of scraping as a part of my ride.
 

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Guess I meet explanation in the video above. I do know this road pretty well and doing around 60 plus in 35-45 MPH listed speed suggestion. I looked pretty close and only found one time I had to do a mid corner correction.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/U38HS4k5B3t23FH9A
 

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...if you are going to hit deer hit the center. .
I would be either swerving or on the brakes with everything I had - to hit the deer in the center you have to aim into it - if you have time to do that, aim away from it.

We have deer hits here in upstate NY. When Im riding the factor for me is how far back the brush and trees are cleared from the sides of the roads. On the thruway its clear about 50 yards - you have plenty of time to see animals, even at night (glowing green eyes).

Some of the roads on my commute have foliage 3 feet from the edge of the pavement. Im as close to the centerline as I can be, and not quite hitting 40mph in those few sections.

The sales guy I bought all my riding gear from hit a deer. He was going 55mph, does not know how much the brakes slowed him down. He went over the handlebars and got to ride the slide. Got up bruised, all his gear looked like he was attacked with an angle grinder, including the whole one side of his full face helmet.

He got up with bruises but no injuries. The deer was killed.

There is a memorial on one of my favorite roads for an older guy who hit a deer on his harley. He died.

So... sometimes your skills and gear save you, and sometimes there is nothing you can do.

But thats how life is for everyone.
 

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I'm a bit of a fan of knowing my limitations on my bikes. Making sparks fly is just a bonus :)
Seriously though, any time I get a new bike, I have to know I can dip and recover so I test it out on low/no traffic curves to make sure I don't have doubts during regular rides
 

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I had the same issue with my 650 when I first started riding again. Totally unexpected since I wasn't riding aggressively and it spooked the crap out of me. Plus that's a really loud and expensive sounding noise coming from an unexpected direction.

Anyway, the general consensus here was very helpful to me. Basically: "Get used to it." Go someplace where you can do it intentionally until you get used to the noise. The board flexes, the pads that scrape are replaceable. Unless you are really throwing your bike into a hard curve and hitting the board really hard, you shouldn't need to worry about it. Practice a bit. It's kinda cool when it stops bothering you.

I rarely scrape the 950 any more, but when I do it is no longer the nerve shattering experience it was at first.
 
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