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Discussion Starter #1
There is a lot of talk about Yamaha almost eliminating it's line of cruisers but what about the other manufacturers? Yamaha is probably making this decision for economic reasons. Are the other manufacturers also feeling the same economic hurt? If I was head of a large bike manufacturer, one way to save money would be to reduce the number of models that I manufactured, but that is not what seems to be happening because each dealership that I visit has many different sport, off-road, sport-touring and scooter models. BTW, I like scooters. Here in Quebec, you only have to be 14 years old to legally ride a 50cc (or smaller) scooter. The driver's test is easy to pass. There are hundreds of scooters all over the place except on auto-routes. I don't live in a large city but I guess that scooters are much more popular in large cities. My granddaughter is 14 and she told me that if she had the choice, she would choose a 2 stroke scooter because they are faster. Each school yard has a parking area full of scooters.
 

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I'm not familiar with bike sales in Canada. However, here in Maine cruiser sales have tanked. I have talked to two Harley dealerships and they all have laid off about half their workforce. The same can be said for Yamaha and Honda. The only bright spot seems to be Indian. They're moving quite well to include the $25,000 and up machines. They all blame millenials who (according to them) spend all their time behind computer screens. They're sales seem to be in "adventure" type motorcyles.

However, there is a bright spot - ATV and 2/4 seater off road machines. They are moving fast to include the winter months. The same can be said for snowmobiles for those areas that have consistent snow.

For me, it's the big cruisers for 7 months of the year and my Argo the rest of the time.
 

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I have been seeing more and more of these dual-sport cross-over bikes. Kinda reminds me of the old enduros that were a trail bike but with street lighting and street legal. Seems like many of them have metal square saddle bags. Not sure why these are so popular but riders are motocross geared up and everything. Nothing negative here, just what I'm seeing more of around here. Some with way out of state plates so these must be comfy on trips.
 

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I have been seeing more and more of these dual-sport cross-over bikes. Kinda reminds me of the old enduros that were a trail bike but with street lighting and street legal. Seems like many of them have metal square saddle bags. Not sure why these are so popular but riders are motocross geared up and everything. Nothing negative here, just what I'm seeing more of around here. Some with way out of state plates so these must be comfy on trips.
Your describing something like the Yamaha “Tenere”. That’s what Long Haul Paul rode over 300,000 miles on. It’s apparently comfortable enough for long hauls on Highway, but will handle off-road trails just as easily. I can understand the draw of an “all around” bike. Being able to go the distance to get to a National Forest somewhere and then being able to ride the trails once you get there. Not my cup of tea, but makes perfect sense.
 

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Your describing something like the Yamaha “Tenere”. That’s what Long Haul Paul rode over 300,000 miles on. It’s apparently comfortable enough for long hauls on Highway, but will handle off-road trails just as easily. I can understand the draw of an “all around” bike. Being able to go the distance to get to a National Forest somewhere and then being able to ride the trails once you get there. Not my cup of tea, but makes perfect sense.
Yes the Yamaha “Tenere” is what I see. BMW makes a nice one as well. Most seem to be sub-1000cc.
 

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Your describing something like the Yamaha “Tenere”. That’s what Long Haul Paul rode over 300,000 miles on. It’s apparently comfortable enough for long hauls on Highway, but will handle off-road trails just as easily. I can understand the draw of an “all around” bike. Being able to go the distance to get to a National Forest somewhere and then being able to ride the trails once you get there. Not my cup of tea, but makes perfect sense.
This.. I'm 43 and I'd put my money on the upcoming Tenere 7 or the existing Tracer 900 GT before I put any money on a cruiser from any company. They just seem to do so much more than what a cruiser can do. I'd even get an XSR900 before another cruiser I think.

However, I also rode an R6 for 10 years so perhaps I am biased. I miss it to be honest. I want that power back (104hp) along with light weight (only 400lbs) and a bit more comfort. I'm not sure any cruiser can do that, can it? The VStar 1100 I have is nice and I'll ride it for a long time because it was given to me and costs me next to nothing, but I desire Adventure and Naked bikes these days. If I'm shelling out $ for a new ride, it's likely not going to be for a cruiser.

Here in Ontario, insurance it's very high for riders under 25yrs old (over $1000/year for any bike, regardless of size or cost or age). That deters them at least until they are older and can afford it. That can't help with sales as I'm sure many of them just never bother to inquire about it again and assume it's just not worth the insurance hit. It's not like riding a motorcycle is cheaper than driving a car. It's not...because of the insurance. A small 4 cylinder car you can drive all year round is the cheapest form of transportation here. All these powersports vehicles are just toys and many these days just can't afford any of these new toys. Heck, they can't even afford to buy a home these days because the prices for first time owners are absurd.
 

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Scooters have their own appeal. I would love to have a new Honda Supercub. The only problem is MSRP is $3500 (US). I just paid $2500 for my 2000 Royal Star last year... I know its not fair to compare a 19 year old used motorcycle to a new scooter, but bang for the buck I bought the Royal Star. I will easily be able to put another 80k miles on the Royal Star odo... I doubt I could get that much use out of the SuperCub.

Ive said before there needs to be some updated MC cruiser bike movies. Its not enough to just do something for its own merit, there needs to be a narrative and a connection.

When I went backpacking in my late teens and 20s, I had read all of Colin Fletcher's books on his backpacking adventures, walking from Mexico to Oregon the entire length of California, hiking the entire length of the Grand Canyon (the first person to do it in one trip). My brother and I had read all of the of the Lord of the Rings books, and when hiking in the wilderness we frequently talked about the books and hobbits and elves...

There needs to be a connection to something bigger than yourself, otherwise while you are out there riding your motorcycle.... where are you going and what do you expect to see and experience?
 

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Your describing something like the Yamaha “Tenere”. That’s what Long Haul Paul rode over 300,000 miles on. It’s apparently comfortable enough for long hauls on Highway, but will handle off-road trails just as easily. I can understand the draw of an “all around” bike. Being able to go the distance to get to a National Forest somewhere and then being able to ride the trails once you get there. Not my cup of tea, but makes perfect sense.
This.. I'm 43 and I'd put my money on the upcoming Tenere 7 or the existing Tracer 900 GT before I put any money on a cruiser from any company. They just seem to do so much more than what a cruiser can do. I'd even get an XSR900 before another cruiser I think.

However, I also rode an R6 for 10 years so perhaps I am biased. I miss it to be honest. I want that power back (104hp) along with light weight (only 400lbs) and a bit more comfort. I'm not sure any cruiser can do that, can it? The VStar 1100 I have is nice and I'll ride it for a long time because it was given to me and costs me next to nothing, but I desire Adventure and Naked bikes these days. If I'm shelling out $ for a new ride, it's likely not going to be for a cruiser.

Here in Ontario, insurance it's very high for riders under 25yrs old (over $1000/year for any bike, regardless of size or cost or age). That deters them at least until they are older and can afford it. That can't help with sales as I'm sure many of them just never bother to inquire about it again and assume it's just not worth the insurance hit. It's not like riding a motorcycle is cheaper than driving a car. It's not...because of the insurance. A small 4 cylinder car you can drive all year round is the cheapest form of transportation here. All these powersports vehicles are just toys and many these days just can't afford any of these new toys. Heck, they can't even afford to buy a home these days because the prices for first time owners are absurd.
Not a single bike you mentioned can ever come close to full dress cruiser. Not just the SVTC but even the Royal Star. You’re used to the leaning forward riding position which is never good on long trips. You might have the “power” but you’ll never go on a long trip riding 500-600 miles per day. Just won’t happen.
You style preference tells us your not into long trips anywhere. Just finding local twisters and burning them up with your knee almost dragging. Completely different riding style than those that ride longer distances for which a cruiser seating position is designed.
 

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I myself am strongly considering a triumph tiger 1200 for my next bike. Awesome torque curve, 140 hp, 7” suspension travel, active suspension, traction control, 34” seat height, supposedly smooth as silk inline triple. Great ergos for the tall, and I am 6,7”. You can do anything with it. ...and I am a solo rider, so...the pillion is for a bag.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have to admit that I am a dying breed. I am happy with 650 ccs. My bike can do 60 mph all day and my feet touch the ground (flat foot). The bike is heavy but light enough to push and duck walk reasonably well. It has leather bags and the passenger seat serves to hold large items like a tent, sleeping bag and a travel bag if needed. Driving over 500 miles in a day....I doubt it....I'm not a person who takes long trips. Hard cornering and high speed......that's for the accident prone. 900 lb bikes with huge motors and lots of noise....not my cup of tea. I can't understand why someone who does not race bikes would want to buy a bike that goes over 200 mph and why they are even sold.
 

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Ive said before there needs to be some updated MC cruiser bike movies. Its not enough to just do something for its own merit, there needs to be a narrative and a connection.
This is a little off the thread but reading KCW's words made me think of my favorite MC movie: The Worlds Fastest Indian

Probably everyone's seen it but if not, it's well worth checking out. Great for a rainy or snowed in winter day.

Trailer for anyone who may have not seen it:
 

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there is a documentary on the battle between Glenn Curtiss and the Wright brothers over early aviation

it would be interesting to see something similar on Glenn's motorcycle exploits. He held the record as the fastest human for several decades, after riding a motorcycle with a 40HP V8 engine over 136mph in the early 1900s

it had one gear, and no brakes

 

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You’re used to the leaning forward riding position which is never good on long trips. You might have the “power” but you’ll never go on a long trip riding 500-600 miles per day.
It looks uncomfortable to me, but on two occasions I've bumped into couples riding double on a BMW. They were either a 1200 RT or a variant. While they are everything I don't think I want in a bike, these people swore they rode them all day, all the time, and recommended them for touring. One guy said he went from cruiser to touring (or whatever they call that style) and was much happier. Highly recommended. It was suggested to me at a yamaha dealership that they may be thinking that is the future of cruising bikes. They do make something very similar. Testing the market, I guess.

I looked around for one to rent so I could try that riding position. No luck. Maybe this summer. But even if I found it to be more comfortable than my 950 cruiser, they are still too expensive, too tall, not as reliable as mine, and did I mention expensive?

To each his own, I guess. Hope to find out for myself one of these days.
 

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to be fair to to the BMW engineers, they are mechanically extremely reliable.

the thing that put them on the bottom of the consumer reports reliability list (below Harley) is all the gadgets and crap they put on the bikes. They were the first with ABS and single pedal dual brakes, GPS, fuel injection, electronic ignition... they were always pushing the new technology before anyone else had it, and as a result all that new extra stuff was prone to failure. And they dont make a base model, stripped down, naked anything motorcycle.

Their reliability goes all the way back to WW2. BMW was making boxer engine motorcycles with shaft drive, and a side car with a driven wheel that was unstoppable by mud or snow. The USA was making jeeps.

I would consider the New Venture a touring bike, no matter what the engine configuration is. Any bike with a full fairing is designed for riding the interstates at 85mph. I dont consider that "cruising". That is hauling long distance with the trucks and buses. Yamaha has always listed their Venture bikes as touring bikes, separate from the cruisers.

in the general sense cruising is travelling with no real destination or purpose, for the purpose of enjoying the experience and travel, not to get from one place to another.
 

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Cruisers are merely a genre of bikes and there are bar-hoppers as well as long distance riders who like the ergos of a cruiser. Fact is that the Sport touring genre has been popular for the decades that I've been riding for one fact... it works. There isn't a single style of motorcycle that works for all people. I've known riders who've done long rides on choppers (cruiser laid back ergos), sport bikes, sport tourers, baggers, UJMs... but to think that there's only one genre of motorcycle capable of touring on, is like saying that there's only one body style, age, physical condition or gender capable of logging long miles.

An old fart like me has toured on cruisers, dressers and cafe/sport touring bikes... they each have their pros and cons but all got me to where I want to go and I enjoyed the ride. So from experience I couldn't damn one genre of bike over another.
 

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The cruiser style of bike is just not selling anymore. Went to talk to the dealer late last year about trading in my 950T. He said he didn't want it. Had two brand new 950's from last year that didn't sell and sure didn't want to add a used one to the inventory. Also had a Raider that I recently tried to trade in. Was given ridiculously low values from a few dealers and another dealer said he didn't want it at all. So what would I think? Should I buy another cruiser? Not going to get a decent resale value unless I sell private and I really don't want anyone coming around the house checking out my bikes. Maybe I should buy what they're selling like the FJR since resale value might be a lot better. What are my other options? For Yamaha just the top of the line Eluder or Venture, nothing else available in a cruiser. Have to go to Suzuki for a C90T or C50T. And that's likely where I would go since Honda has done the same as Yamaha. Get a lot of bike for 13 grand with the C90T. I think it's only a matter of time before Suzuki drops their cruisers too though. Sad times.
 

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trade in value? Do you like to buy motorcycles, ride them for a few years, then get something else? If that is the case there is nothing wrong with that.

I have owned maybe 25 cars and 4 motorcycles in my life, and can say when I bought them the question of how much I could sell them for has never crossed my mind. I have kept nearly all my vehicles till it was time to tow or 'limp' them to the scrap yard.

From a buyers perspective, if you like riding cruiser bikes, this is the best buyers market ever.
 

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trade in value? Do you like to buy motorcycles, ride them for a few years, then get something else? If that is the case there is nothing wrong with that.

I have owned maybe 25 cars and 4 motorcycles in my life, and can say when I bought them the question of how much I could sell them for has never crossed my mind. I have kept nearly all my vehicles till it was time to tow or 'limp' them to the scrap yard.

From a buyers perspective, if you like riding cruiser bikes, this is the best buyers market ever.
I’m pretty much the same way. I’ve only owned 3 bikes BUT I’ve kept and rode each for almost 10 years. Wasn’t worried about resale but rather riding it until the tires fall off. I will say my 1st bike... an 85 Honda Shadow was awesome! I rode that thing for 7 years and put OVER 100,000 miles on it and STILL sold it for 1/3 the price I paid for it. Honda also really backed their product too. The Shadow is a “cruiser” from my understanding. I was in the military at the time down on the base and was admiring an 89 Venture Royale when the owner walked up. We talked for a bit and then he asked if I want to take it for a short ride around the base! I was like “are you serious?!” To make a long story short... the power, comfort, ride, handling, features...OMG! I knew I had been bitten by the “Touring Bug” and had my sights now set on getting one. Had to wait a couple years but I moved up to a 91 Yamaha Venture Royale. All I can say is “what a bike!” That power plant V4 was incredible to say the least.
This new SVTC is a different beast, but even with all the speculation about sales and resale value, I bought it to ride the crap out of it, NOT to sell it in a few years.
 

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I'm not concerned about resale as I usually put too many miles on my bikes to make them have a decent resale value. I generally just drive them til they drop too. This time in my case I was left a Yamaha Raider in my friend's will. The will stated I could buy the bike for $5,000 and he had paid $8,500 for it just 7 months ago. I thought it was a good deal until I started checking around and found out the value was anywhere from $3,800 to $5,000 max wholesale so there was no point in me buying it unless I wanted to sell it myself or keep it. Didn't want to do either so I ended up selling it on behalf of the estate and giving them the proceeds. I did sell my bike in the meantime for 1/2 of what I had paid for it in 2013. That was a fair price as it had a lot of miles on it so I think I did well.

On the other side I bought a 2013 Road Star with 26,700 miles and got a tremendous deal on it. So everything is relevant, you may not get much for a trade in or on resale but you will get an excellent price buying a used cruiser.

I don't know very many people that put the miles on their bikes like I do and some of you guys on here. The point I was trying to make was that if you just ride 3,000 miles a year and trade in every 5 years you may want to consider buying a sport tourer for a higher resale value.
 

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If you want resale value then buy a Harley. There seems to be a lot of people willing to pay too much for a used Harley.
I don't care about resale value and prefer to ride my bikes, so I ride metric's.
 
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