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So when I purchased my V-Star last year the guy told me that he'd accidentally sprayed hornet killer on his windshield a few years back and had never been able to get it off.

You could still see through it but it wasn't exactly pretty. So this weekend I figured I'd try and clean it off.

I tried a Magic Eraser, nada.

Then I tried Goof-Off, which has worked wonders for me on stainless steel before. Sure enough, the streaks are gone but they've been replaced with a haziness that you CAN'T see through, but you can feel (i.e. it has texture).

Have I damaged the plastic on it? Is there any saving it?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Have I damaged the plastic on it? Is there any saving it?

Thanks in advance!
Hard to tell. When you say "texture" is it like an additive texture or spiderweb haze surface scratches? Lexan can be very unforgiving of anything acidic or that contains ammonia or an ammonia derivative.

For the simplest of tests, see if you can find a can of Pledge or Old English or Great Value furniture polish around the house. If you can, spray your windshield and polish off with soft cloth (terrycloth towel, old t-shirt). Pledge (and equivalent) will fill in very fine scratches and do nearly miraculous things with an "etched" windshield.

But if your "Goof-Off" has melted or softened the Lexan so that you basically stirred it around when you were wiping it off, then the following may apply to you:



'Luck, eh?:)
 

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you could use a buffing wheel and polishing compound as if you were buffing out the hood of a car. Then after that use Brasso polish with the buffing wheel, make sure and clean the buffing wheel out before switching to the brasso. I used the brass to polish my iPod because it was all scratched up and it worked perfect, should have similar results on windshield. look at it this way, you can't make it any worse.
 

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Test first

Before you try anything new on your windshield I would try a small spot in a corner that doesn't show.

Not sure about iPods but most smart phones use a high tech glass called Gorella Glass. Made by Corning. May not be the same.

Dave
 

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For the simplest of tests, see if you can find a can of Pledge or Old English or Great Value furniture polish around the house. If you can, spray your windshield and polish off with soft cloth (terrycloth towel, old t-shirt). Pledge (and equivalent) will fill in very fine scratches and do nearly miraculous things with an "etched" windshield.
Springer, I was a little impatient when I bought my new windsheild for my bike. It had a sticker on it when it came out of the box. After picking at it for a week I got a brainy idea. I know back in my teen years we used to use razor blades to peel off stickers or old tint. So the brainiac here decided to try it. Well I ended up with little scratches in the right corner. Do you think this will work on the tiny scratches or will it mess up my windshield.
 

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I agree with Farmall, it's toast. For fun compare the possibility of tendinitis from buffing out the whole windshield vs, the cost of a crystal clear, brand spankin new, I can see a lady bug in the road 12 feet in front of me, windshield.
 

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Here's a tip that may save the day !

Ok Guys and Gals, along with my many different preaching subjects lol !, I also happen to build/restore and fly airplanes, and our windshields/windscreens are basicly the same as the stuff on our scooters, and cost quite abit more, so check out the below kit, it's fantastic, I have used it quite a few times myself. in a nutshell, it's a bunch of very fine sandpaper, many different grits, down to almost a baby butt smoothness and a lubricant to float the sanded particles off the work piece. Check out the aircraftspruce site. They have a good selection of materials that will work with our scooters.
Enjoy and learn something new everyday.


1. MICRO-MESH ACRYLIC RESTORAL KIT - 100 SQUARE FEET

This kit is used by hand to restore up to 100 square feet of aircraft transparencies or other acrylic surfaces.
http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/cspages/micromeshprof.php - 1.6kb

09-24716 MICROMESH SCRTCH REM PROF. KIT $68.95
 

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I ended up with little scratches in the right corner. Do you think this will work on the tiny scratches or will it mess up my windshield.
Depending on how deep the scratches are, it should. There's nothing in any of the Pledge-type polishes that will hurt Lexan. I've used Pledge, Old English, Favor, Great Value on all my windshields and they do a couple of things:

1. They temporarily will fill in haze scratches to a point you think you have a new windshield, but when you wash the windshield (with a non-ammonia windshield wash) you'll have to go back over it with Pledge;
2. Makes it much easier to clean bugs off the Lexan; and
3. Makes a good water beading coating.

Aircraft owners and motorcyclists have been using Pledge (and others similar) without any ill effect on Lexan for years.

But as I say, it's a temporary coating that will wear off. Whenever I use a detergent to wash my windshield, after it's dried, I always go back over it with a coating of Favor/Pledge, etc. Been doing it for years.;)

I also use the stuff as an interim wax job on all parts of the bike between serious wax/polishes with Meguiars.
 

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Might be a great idea if he only has scratches to deal with. One observation is the kit is (round figures) $70 and a plain jane windshield will be $100~$120 brand new.

I'd have to weigh in the labor to buff the old one, so not sure which way I'd go.

If I was spiffing up a $1000 (WAG) windshield it would be an easy decision.

The other factor here is, he may have chemically altered the material's mechanical properties of his Lexan/Polycarbonate to a depth of several thousnads of an inch deep into the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks guys. I'll try the pledge. If that doesn't work I'll probably just get a new one.
 

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Good points !

I should have detailed the less expensive selection, it was in the 20-30 range, and it's pretty good for the oh crap scratches, and some crazing, It does take some work but it's worth it vice replacing a complete shield. Now just my own windshield was 116.00 but the stock windshield on the strat is what 200-300.00.
Oh and owning one of these micro mesh kits pays for it self over and over, I have a kit that's probably 15 years old and still is in good shape, you clean the various sand paper sheets with water, then let them dry, and put back in the container. I don't know how many windshields I have done minor repairs on.

For the poor guy with the melted shield, the screwed picture was pretty good. Sometimes you have to know when to just punt !

Stay safe out there, my bike is parked in a dry place, as I don't want to purchase pontoons and a life jacket to ride the beast lol.
Us east coasters were complaining about not enough rain for the last several month's, well we GOT RAIN, floods, new rivers, washed out roads, lots of downed tree's. And zillions of traffic jams. So it's our turn in the disaster mode of operation. And now there's talk of another big storm in the Gulf.
 

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Gotta agree with previous mentioned advice. I've had to restore my Pawnee's windshield a few times now and have built a few acrylic fish tanks as well.

Sand fine, finer and finer, then buff. I never actually bought a kit, but rather dug info off the net on fish tanks and went with that for the Pawnee the first time. It was after, that I got into tanks.

Frank
 

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I wonder if the kits you can buy for restoring headlights would work. I just did the headlights on my Honda pilot and they look brand new. Very similar kit to what dcody40 is describing. Available at any Walmart or auto parts store. About $30.
 

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Hey !! what about that headlight lens commercial that's on TV.

It seems to take of haze on the commercial

Besides ..if you hurry you get double the offer...LOL

And double the S&H as always...LOL
 

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Aircraft owners and motorcyclists have been using Pledge (and others similar) without any ill effect on Lexan for years.

QUOTE]

but will it help ease the pain of getting dicked by my CoC?
 

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I used to own a business where we manufactured and installed polycarbonate patio covers. If your windshield is polycarbonate (Lexan) you are toast. The reason is that any polycarbonate that is used for outdoor applications must have a thin coating to block UV light. Your windshield has this coating and if you start sanding it down to remove the "texture" or scratches you will remove the UV coating and your windshield will start to cloud up as it gets exposed to sunlight.

The only approved solvent for polycarbonate is VM&P Naphtha. You can find the stuff in the paint section of Home Depot or a paint store. The safer way to go, however, is to use car wax (I use Rain Dance) as your solvent if you can't get bugs or tar off your windshield with soap and water.

You can buy scratch removers and polishes specifically formulated for polycarbonate and acrylic from Novus and Meguiars. In my experience Rain Dance works about as well. The specialty products are available at marine stores like West Marine because polycarbonate is often used in boats.

A solvent cocktail like Goof Off will attack the plastic big time. If you have something that won't come off with VM&P Naphtha you're stuck.

When you go to buy a new windshield you will have the choice of acrylic (Plexiglass) or polycarbonate (Lexan). Acrylic windshields are less expensive and more resistant to scratching because the material is harder. The downside is that they will shatter much more easily than a polycarbonate shield. Polycarbonate is a more expensive material and it is considerably more difficult to form because you have to bake out all the moisture before you form it. The newer generation of polycarbonate shields also have a scratch resistant coating which adds additional cost. With that coating, however, the polycarbonate shield will be more scratch resistant than acyrlic. For a helmet visor or a Formula 1 race car canopy polycarbonate is the only logical choice. For motorcycles my opinion is that both materials are fine.

Sorry for the long post but I don't get to expound on something I know about very often so thanks for humoring me.....

 
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