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It's re-paving season in the Northeast. The commute today reminded me of an article by an MSF master and author (BMW and MCN, the old CR type b/w rag) David Hough...look him up! He also wrote: PROFICIENT MOTORCYCLING:The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well.

At any rate, The "edge trap" refers to the fact that unlike cars, two wheelers can be significantly upset by a low angle approach to an edge, whether it's a new, 3"-high section of new pavement in the other lane, RR tracks, or a stick in the road. To paraphrase his lesson, and b'cuz I have witnessed that this ain't obvious to everyone: relax, use gentle throttle, and approach these hazards with as wide an angle as reasonable/safe/possible. Do not attempt to cross in a parallel direction. If you can get a little more weight on the pegs under your feet, all the better.
Enjoy your ride.
 

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Another thing that can "grab" you tires are road snakes & grooved paved.

Speaking of repaving roads... when the grind up the old blacktop and you have the rough road underneath. A few months back, I was riding down a road that was being redone. And my tires got caught in a groove. It took my bike almost into the other lane. Thank goodness I was traveling at a slower speed then the rest of traffic. So there was no one next to me. Otherwise, I may have spoked that vehicle. Or worse "brought" broadside into the car.


Ride Smart! Ride Often!
 

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couple things to keep in mind about hitting things on the road

a motorcycle at speed is self balancing. If you are going fast enough and you hit something in the road, the motorcycle will steer into the fall and correct itself. It wont end up going the same direction as it was, but it will not fall over - UNLESS you grab the handlebars stiffly and prevent it from steering into its fall - then you will drop the bike - so like GMT said: relax

if you are going slow then its up to you to steer thru the deflection - so another part of this is DONT hit the brakes and go over it slow, the bike will not be able to balance itself

the other thing is the bike is most stable and most self balancing when the rider center of mass is as close as possible to the center of mass of the motorcycle - so when you see something coming lean forward, get your body as close to the gas tank as you can - and if you have one of those vertical backpack things all the way back behind the riders backrest then this is when its going to get you in trouble.

People think they can load their bike out of balance, or tow a trailer, as long as they are careful and dont try to play SportBike on an overloaded cruiser. But when these obstacles come up, if your bike is loaded in a way that makes it unstable, you will crash.
 

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Around here a lot of secondary roads are paved with chipseal (tar and gravel). Not only is it hard on tires, but when they get potholed or broken they just slap an asphalt patch over it, year after year. After a few years of this the roads are almost unrideable. The patches are rougher than the original damage.
 

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I just got my vstar 1300. Before that I was on a Ninja 250. It was so light that I never felt comfortable wearing any backpack. Any shifting of the weight was enough to upset the balance of a 350 pound bike with highish center of gravity. Just enough in, say, deep leans or tricky (read slick) conditions.

I found an interesting thing to watch for today. I spent the day bopping around some back country roads. Just regular 2 lane blacktop. I found ruts that cars tires make in the summer when the asphalt heats up and starts sinking. Right or wrong, (when safe to do so) I'd just roll on and drift out relying on the torque to pull me up and out.
 
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