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Discussion Starter #1
I got quoted between $600-$700 USD. For the first service. That sounds a bit ridiculous, and what exactly goes into the first service for our bikes to cost that much? I’m thinking they are bumping out the labor rate to compensate for the tech to figure it out. Anyone want to chime in with the going rate, and what exactly this service covers will be appreciated
 

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That is a rip off. Even my dealer who is one of the worst dealers there is only charged $341.75 for the first service which is still high as they originally told me the first service costs about $150 to $175.

I will no longer take my bike to my selling dealer because they are a bunch of crooks.
 

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To be honest a first service is pretty much an oil change, the rest is just inspections and checking the torque of certain fasteners.

You can do all the same work yourself for a fraction of the cost and you get to spend time with your bike learning it and you know the work was done properly.

If you are not mechanically inclined then you might have to bite the bullet so to speak and bend over at the dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good to know. The dealer was making it seem like they had to hook it up to a computer, and do some other advanced stuff with the electronics. I can handle torques and oil
 

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I would not under estimate the importance of the first service on any motorcycle.

If something was not fabricated or assembled correctly at the factory, if it does not fail the first time the bike is used, it will most likely fail within the first couple hundred miles. That is part of the reason the first service is at 600 or 1000 miles, and the rest are at 4000 to 8000 mile intervals. That plus its important to change out the factory oil and filter, in case anything got flushed loose in the first several hours of riding the bike.

$700 seems pretty steep - that is about 10 hours of shop time / labor rates. I would think 2 to 3 hours would cover everything that needs to be drained, changed and checked - unless Yamaha thinks it is necessary to re-torque every single bolt and fastener in the entire motorcycle.
 

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Good to know. The dealer was making it seem like they had to hook it up to a computer, and do some other advanced stuff with the electronics. I can handle torques and oil
They do hook up the Yamaha diagnostic computer but if you are not getting a check engine light it should not be downloading any codes.

Here is the owners manual and what a 600 mile service entails:

1. Diagnostic system Check, check for error codes.

2. Clutch, Check operation, fluid level and for fluid leakage.

3. Front brake, Check operation, fluid level and for fluid leakage.

4. Rear brake, Check operation, fluid level and for fluid leakage.

5. Drive belt, Check belt condition, check belt tension adjust if necessary.

6. Steering bearings, Check bearing assemblies for looseness.

7. Sidestand Switch Check operation and replace if necessary.

8. Engine oil, Change (warm engine before draining).

9. Engine oil filter cartridge, Replace.

10. Front and rear brake switches, Check operation.

11. Lights, signals and switches, Check operation. Adjust headlight beam.

That is all the listed items for a 600 mile service from the owners manual out of 28 total items for routine maintenance.
 

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To be honest I don't know many people who really take their motorcycles to the dealer for service including the first service.

I took my Harley in for the first service at 1,000 miles because I had three oil changes and it included the first service. I took this Yamaha Star Venture in for the first service because I purchased a maintenance package that includes all scheduled maintenance.

But after having issues with the dealer I am eating the cost of the contract and doing the maintenance myself from here on out. I have zero trust in the dealership.

This bike is pretty easy to work on, which actually surprises me as most of the time engineers will find a way to make everything hard to work on.
 

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Being mechanically challenged and living in an apartment I have no choice. But I am lucky to have a great dealer and service dept. Andre a jr tech the guy who did my first service on my Custom 1100 back in 2002 became service manager. They hold on to their people a long time, Must pay good wages. PCP Yamaha rocks.
 

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The last couple cars I purchased new came with free oil changes for the first couple service internals, and they would do a 97 point check over the whole car.

I think they do that to catch anything that might be an issue before they end up with serious warranty repairs.

I think they also do this with new car owners to show them their service department and how nicely they can do your service work.
 

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Being mechanically challenged and living in an apartment I have no choice. But I am lucky to have a great dealer and service dept. Andre a jr tech the guy who did my first service on my Custom 1100 back in 2002 became service manager. They hold on to their people a long time, Must pay good wages. PCP Yamaha rocks.
I envy you guys with good dealers, living in the retirement capitol of the world (Florida) many dealers prey on retirees because they are older and no longer have the place or ability to service their own vehicles so they will pay a shop to do the work.

Maybe it is because I started out after school as a mechanic and was taught to do the job right the first time that I just hold dealers to a standard they are just not willing to reach for.

This is a quote for shops to live by: :Why is there never enough time to do the job right the first time but there is always enough time to do the same job a second time".
 

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To be honest a first service is pretty much an oil change, the rest is just inspections and checking the torque of certain fasteners.

You can do all the same work yourself for a fraction of the cost and you get to spend time with your bike learning it and you know the work was done properly.

If you are not mechanically inclined then you might have to bite the bullet so to speak and bend over at the dealer.
American, First 600 Service, is needed to be completed by a dealer of the Yamaha USA or Canada network. It can be any Yamaha-certified dealer. This is for compliance of full 5 year warranty. This is the most critical service, as the dealer shall AND SHOULD, update your service record to Mama Yama.

Taking it to Joe Schmoe will not cut it, if a serious warranty claim is put through. I found that out with Honda, on my 750 Four.

I watched my dealer enter all the data, the date, mileage, VIN number into his Yamaha Dealer Service computer terminal,...for my 600 mile SVTC service, and it is now on my record with them as well as Yamaha Canada Corporate, as well, any other dealer can call up the service record and see what has been done, while on tour, and they need to know the service history of my SVTC. They even know what version of oil was installed to replace the OEM. YamaLube 15W50, it was.

If he/she does not take the bike to a dealer for this, and even if he/she does all the work at home....any trouble down the road...and he/she could be in for a very unpleasant surprise. Yamaha offers you a warranty, and they have a right to know that a certified tech/mechanic signed off on the work. If there was fraud involved, and the work and/or inspections per mileage obtained, not done....that will be between Yamaha and the dealer that signed off, and charged you for the service. In that event, the owner is covered by Yamaha, as they did what was required by them to maintain Warranty Coverage.

Anybody that says, your in-period warranty is not affected, if you don't carry our the prescribed services, by a certified-in-network dealer, are plain wrong. Yamaha is covering the owner's butt...and they have a legal right to know that their service recommendations/time schedules have been followed...for them to cover issues IN SPITE of the owner's due diligence. If the reader thinks that this is wrong...wait until you go in for multi-thousand dollar warranty claim from any manufacturer, and they pull your Service Record...and don't see anything much there....good luck. Good luck....
 

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I would not under estimate the importance of the first service on any motorcycle.

If something was not fabricated or assembled correctly at the factory, if it does not fail the first time the bike is used, it will most likely fail within the first couple hundred miles. That is part of the reason the first service is at 600 or 1000 miles, and the rest are at 4000 to 8000 mile intervals. That plus its important to change out the factory oil and filter, in case anything got flushed loose in the first several hours of riding the bike.

$700 seems pretty steep - that is about 10 hours of shop time / labor rates. I would think 2 to 3 hours would cover everything that needs to be drained, changed and checked - unless Yamaha thinks it is necessary to re-torque every single bolt and fastener in the entire motorcycle.
As I posted, this is a must have certified dealer service that will be entered on their Yamaha Corporate computer system, for SVTC service in-period warranty scope. The O.P.'s dealer is try to hose him/her. My 600 miles cost in total was $223.49

Here is the bill break down, for my 600 mile post break in, first service. I am reading right off of it to post here:

Labor $48.00
Parts:$142.94
Misc: $3.84 for White Lithium and Dielectric Grease to grease both grommets sets of the left and right hand side panels. White Grease (soap) to all suspension and rear support rubber bushings. Oh...just saw that my Side Stand pivot was also White Greased... Critical engine mounts, axle torques, were inspected, with none needing adjustment.
Other: $3.00 (environmental fee)

Sub Total: $197.78
HST (Tax in Ontario, Canada at 13%) $25.71

Total: $223.49 (This includes YamaLube Full Synthetic 15W50 Oil and new -60 series Yamaha Oil Filter. I was standing, watching the whole service, and the drive belt was also miked by the proper flex gauge.

What's going on in the States with these crooks? My Kawasaki dealer is the same honest operator as my Yamaha dealer is...I have never been hosed or charged for work not completed. For all liquid Re and Re, I make sure I am there...as well as for tire RE and RE. For anything else, I can check the part(s) off of the actual bike, or see my internal replacement parts for the what and why of the repair, or maintenance cycle.
 

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I envy you guys with good dealers, living in the retirement capitol of the world (Florida) many dealers prey on retirees because they are older and no longer have the place or ability to service their own vehicles so they will pay a shop to do the work.

Maybe it is because I started out after school as a mechanic and was taught to do the job right the first time that I just hold dealers to a standard they are just not willing to reach for.

This is a quote for shops to live by: :Why is there never enough time to do the job right the first time but there is always enough time to do the same job a second time".
This is just freakin sad. So true but sad. I am having a real difficult time determining whether I should bring my bike in for the 4,000 miles service. The service manager I have known for years but had some issue with some service work and never treat my bike very well. When the delivered my bike they scratch the trunk and they asked if I want $200 off the bike or the trunk replace. I opted to get the trunk replaced but there was some issues between service not wanted to do it and the sales Dept telling them to do it thats when I decided to take the trunk and do it myself. Haven't been back since.
So I have a new trunk to put on that is sitting in the box in the garage but the scratch is so small and hidden behind the right antenna that it is not much of an issue and will replace it after I figure out why the plastic side piece (top of trunk lid near seat) for the left side is about $80 and the right side is only about $8, big difference. They paid for the Yamaha emblem but not the plastic side pieces. They said they can be reused these. Hence another reason why I took the trunk with me. New bike and they are trying to save money and cut corners. Anyway the plan would be to buy the cheap side and heat gun that off to see what happens then if all is well place the new side piece on the new trunk and then on the expensive side heat that off and reuse. But like I stated it can wait for now. Still not sure if I need to replace the large rubber piece that covers the top part of the trunk near the back seat or if it can be reused, looks like it can. So this is why I am hesitant to take my baby in an leave for the day. ☹
 

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Yamaha can't deny you warranty because you did not go to them for service. Canada may have different laws but down here in the states you are not bound to have to take your vehicle to the dealer. Now the manufacture can make you do it but under the law if they do that then they will have to provide you the parts and service free of charge.

BMW has done that with their cars for oil changes, but it does not cost you anything because BMW is making you use their dealer. They try to make it look like they are being nice to you and advertise it as they cover all oil changes for x number of years, but the truth is BMW has to provide the oil changes for free because they will void the warranty if you don't go to them for the oil change so the law states that if a manufacture does that then they have to provide said service free of charge to the customer.

Back to Yamaha or even Honda for that matter, and I own a Honda Civic and do all the maintenance myself, but they can't deny you warranty work because you did not have the vehicle serviced at their dealer network. Honda has never given me any static about warranty work even though I do not use their dealers for maintenance.

Yamaha nor Honda are providing said services free of charge so here in the states they can't void your warranty because you did not use their dealer for service.

Just log your receipts for your oil and parts and keep a spread sheet showing the service work was done and they will have no case to deny any warranty claim.
 

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This is just freakin sad. So true but sad. I am having a real difficult time determining whether I should bring my bike in for the 4,000 miles service. The service manager I have known for years but had some issue with some service work and never treat my bike very well. When the delivered my bike they scratch the trunk and they asked if I want $200 off the bike or the trunk replace. I opted to get the trunk replaced but there was some issues between service not wanted to do it and the sales Dept telling them to do it thats when I decided to take the trunk and do it myself. Haven't been back since.
So I have a new trunk to put on that is sitting in the box in the garage but the scratch is so small and hidden behind the right antenna that it is not much of an issue and will replace it after I figure out why the plastic side piece (top of trunk lid near seat) for the left side is about $80 and the right side is only about $8, big difference. They paid for the Yamaha emblem but not the plastic side pieces. They said they can be reused these. Hence another reason why I took the trunk with me. New bike and they are trying to save money and cut corners. Anyway the plan would be to buy the cheap side and heat gun that off to see what happens then if all is well place the new side piece on the new trunk and then on the expensive side heat that off and reuse. But like I stated it can wait for now. Still not sure if I need to replace the large rubber piece that covers the top part of the trunk near the back seat or if it can be reused, looks like it can. So this is why I am hesitant to take my baby in an leave for the day. ☹
I'd call around...and find a dealer that will let you observe the oil and filter changes being done, even if from just outside the shop door, due to safety shoe and whatever conditions. Explain to them that you had a prior 'fraudulent oil and filter Re and Re' and now for your own peace of mind, require to see visually that the work has been properly done, and all fluids ordered, (the actual oil going in...) as well as the RE and RE of the oil filter, be done.

Or, you can buy all your own oil..keep the bills...and hope that that bill will satisfy Yamaha that the oil and filter was changed according to their published maintenance requirements. But..having said that...you are in Las Vegas and spinning the wheel....by doing that.

I always (in warranty) do the work prescribed, and see it entered into the dealer network computer system. After warranty? I do my own work....inside and outside the engine. Warranty period? Nope...nope...not after what it cost me on my Honda 750 Four. Never a fool to make a mistake, only a fool to repeat the mistake. A good mantra to live by... ;)

Post Edit: If you can live with that scratch..or even fix it with a touch up tube...I'd do that..and just bank your new trunk in the basement. Saves you all the hassle and ????'s If you can not find the exact color...and YamaMama doesn't have a touch up stick/pen...then you can go to any paint house that has a laser paint analyzer...and they can make you up the smallest container they offer.... I got the laser treatment for my 2000 GL1500, and after the body shop did their magic with it....you could never tell that some @***@-wipe, keyed my faring at a 2000 GWRRA WingDing event. So, that might be another option for you...
 

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This may help those in the states:

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0138-auto-warranties-routine-maintenance

What is a warranty?

A warranty is a promise, often made by a manufacturer, to stand behind its product or to fix certain defects or malfunctions over a period of time. The warranty pays for any covered repairs or part replacements during the warranty period.

Do I have to use the dealer for repairs and maintenance to keep my warranty in effect?

No. An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

That said, there may be certain situations where a repair may not be covered. For example, if you or your mechanic replaced a belt improperly and your engine is damaged as a result, your manufacturer or dealer may deny responsibility for fixing the engine under the warranty. However, according to the FTC, the manufacturer or dealer must be able to demonstrate that it was the improper belt replacement — rather than some other defect — that caused the damage to your engine. The warranty would still be in effect for other parts of your car.

Will using 'aftermarket' or recycled parts void my warranty?

No. An 'aftermarket' part is a part made by a company other than the vehicle manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer. A 'recycled' part is a part that was made for and installed in a new vehicle by the manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer, and later removed from the vehicle and made available for resale or reuse. Simply using an aftermarket or recycled part does not void your warranty. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act makes it illegal for companies to void your warranty or deny coverage under the warranty simply because you used an aftermarket or recycled part. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select parts if those parts are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

Still, if it turns out that the aftermarket or recycled part was itself defective or wasn't installed correctly, and it causes damage to another part that is covered under the warranty, the manufacturer or dealer has the right to deny coverage for that part and charge you for any repairs. The FTC says the manufacturer or dealer must show that the aftermarket or recycled part caused the need for repairs before denying warranty coverage.

Tips To Avoid Warranty Issues

Here's how to get the most out of your vehicle's warranty:

Read your warranty. Often bundled with your owner's manual, the warranty gives a general description and specific details about your coverage. If you have misplaced your owner's manual, look for it online. Check the "Owners" section of your manufacturer's website.

Be aware of your warranty period. If problems arise that are covered under the warranty, get them checked out before the warranty expires.

Service your car at regular intervals. This is a good idea in any case. But for the sake of keeping your warranty intact, follow the manufacturer's recommended service schedule. Details are in your owner's manual.

Keep all service records and receipts, regardless of who performs the service. This includes oil changes, tire rotations, belt replacement, new brake pads, and inspections. Create a file to keep track of repairs; it will come in handy if you have to use your warranty. If you ever have a warranty claim and it appears that you did not maintain your vehicle, your claim could be denied.

Complain. If you think a dealer's service advisor denied your warranty claim unfairly, ask to speak with a supervisor. If you still aren't satisfied, contact the manufacturer or go to another dealer. You also may wish to file a complaint with your state Attorney General, local consumer protection office, or the FTC.
 

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Good to know. The dealer was making it seem like they had to hook it up to a computer, and do some other advanced stuff with the electronics. I can handle torques and oil
My dealer hooked up by the hand held...it ran all the tests...in and out, 2 minutes. You are being 'set up'...read my total bill for my 600 miles service also on this thread. They sound like (this guy/gal can afford this bike...so they can also afford more green for their servicing of it). I'd certainly find another dealer, that wants you to come back, time and time, again. There is only one way that will happen...and no choir preaching needed, (large smile)., as to how they can guarantee you will! :)
 

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This may help those in the states:

What is a warranty?

A warranty is a promise, often made by a manufacturer, to stand behind its product or to fix certain defects or malfunctions over a period of time. The warranty pays for any covered repairs or part replacements during the warranty period.

Do I have to use the dealer for repairs and maintenance to keep my warranty in effect?

No. An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

That said, there may be certain situations where a repair may not be covered. For example, if you or your mechanic replaced a belt improperly and your engine is damaged as a result, your manufacturer or dealer may deny responsibility for fixing the engine under the warranty. However, according to the FTC, the manufacturer or dealer must be able to demonstrate that it was the improper belt replacement — rather than some other defect — that caused the damage to your engine. The warranty would still be in effect for other parts of your car.

Will using 'aftermarket' or recycled parts void my warranty?

No. An 'aftermarket' part is a part made by a company other than the vehicle manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer. A 'recycled' part is a part that was made for and installed in a new vehicle by the manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer, and later removed from the vehicle and made available for resale or reuse. Simply using an aftermarket or recycled part does not void your warranty. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act makes it illegal for companies to void your warranty or deny coverage under the warranty simply because you used an aftermarket or recycled part. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select parts if those parts are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

Still, if it turns out that the aftermarket or recycled part was itself defective or wasn't installed correctly, and it causes damage to another part that is covered under the warranty, the manufacturer or dealer has the right to deny coverage for that part and charge you for any repairs. The FTC says the manufacturer or dealer must show that the aftermarket or recycled part caused the need for repairs before denying warranty coverage.

Tips To Avoid Warranty Issues

Here's how to get the most out of your vehicle's warranty:

Read your warranty. Often bundled with your owner's manual, the warranty gives a general description and specific details about your coverage. If you have misplaced your owner's manual, look for it online. Check the "Owners" section of your manufacturer's website.

Be aware of your warranty period. If problems arise that are covered under the warranty, get them checked out before the warranty expires.

Service your car at regular intervals. This is a good idea in any case. But for the sake of keeping your warranty intact, follow the manufacturer's recommended service schedule. Details are in your owner's manual.

Keep all service records and receipts, regardless of who performs the service. This includes oil changes, tire rotations, belt replacement, new brake pads, and inspections. Create a file to keep track of repairs; it will come in handy if you have to use your warranty. If you ever have a warranty claim and it appears that you did not maintain your vehicle, your claim could be denied.

Complain. If you think a dealer's service advisor denied your warranty claim unfairly, ask to speak with a supervisor. If you still aren't satisfied, contact the manufacturer or go to another dealer. You also may wish to file a complaint with your state Attorney General, local consumer protection office, or the FTC.
American, all well and done, but you are still open to taking the manufacturer to court....going through the rat race...and not necessarily 100 percent guaranteed of a win solution, or you can during the Warranty Period, take your prize to the certified dealer network, and if any warranty claim arises, you have no worries...and they will not fight it, but will repair, and take whatever after-glow, up with their dealer(s). The above manifest does not guarantee a satisfactory Owner outcome, every time, and a guaranteed outcome nonetheless!...
 

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Yamaha can't deny you warranty because you did not go to them for service. Canada may have different laws but down here in the states you are not bound to have to take your vehicle to the dealer. Now the manufacture can make you do it but under the law if they do that then they will have to provide you the parts and service free of charge.

BMW has done that with their cars for oil changes, but it does not cost you anything because BMW is making you use their dealer. They try to make it look like they are being nice to you and advertise it as they cover all oil changes for x number of years, but the truth is BMW has to provide the oil changes for free because they will void the warranty if you don't go to them for the oil change so the law states that if a manufacture does that then they have to provide said service free of charge to the customer.

Back to Yamaha or even Honda for that matter, and I own a Honda Civic and do all the maintenance myself, but they can't deny you warranty work because you did not have the vehicle serviced at their dealer network. Honda has never given me any static about warranty work even though I do not use their dealers for maintenance.

Yamaha nor Honda are providing said services free of charge so here in the states they can't void your warranty because you did not use their dealer for service.

Just log your receipts for your oil and parts and keep a spread sheet showing the service work was done and they will have no case to deny any warranty claim.
With that all said, Bill...still there is implied litigation, out-of-pocket expenses, and delay time, or no time, in riding your bike. That..is still there...even with the above...
 

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Now if you do performance modifications to your vehicle that gets more tricky, a tuner can and has resulted in people having their powertrain warranty voided.

Harley Davidson is even voiding warranties now for changing the exhaust system, because these motorcycles today come with catalytic converters. I don't know of any aftermarket mufflers that are coming with a catalytic converter built into them but that may change as the manufactures are now doing that. Harley used to put the catalytic converter in the header pipes in front of the slip on mufflers, Victory did the same. These Yamaha's have the catalytic converters in the slip on mufflers.

Aftermarket bolt on parts outside of the exhaust systems mentioned above normally won't void a warranty. I have not heard of a warranty being voided yet for an intake system, not to say someone has not had it happen to them but that one is far harder for a dealer to claim it causes an issue.
 
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