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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I'm fairly new to this hobby but am enjoying it to the fullest.
After lurking old threads it seems like I must grease the splines in the final drive with moly grease or risk damaging the unit.
I have a 1999 XVS with about 31000km on it. Purchased used late last year. I recently changed the oil, replaced the air filters and spark plugs. This was my first time doing of this but I enjoyed the process and learning how to do these things.
However, removing the entire rear wheel and partly disassemble the drive shaft seems intimidating, so I want to ask these two questions:

1. My bike is running fine as far as I can tell, the rear tire has enough profile. Should I still disassemble everything solely to grease the splines?
2. If so, is there a comprehensive guide on how to do this? I've seem people refer to the knowledge base on this website but so far I'm unable to find it.

Bonus question: other than the already performed maintanence actions, I want to replace the final drive oil. Is there anything other than that I should perform on this new-to-me bike to ensure safe and smooth riding? Like brake fluid replacement for example.

Thank you so much for your time and ride safe.
 

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I check the spines on my 1100 whenever I changed the tires. Once you get the wheel free, you just pull it back and down and the driveshaft comes off with it. Then it's just a matter of pulling the differential off the hub. It can be a little tight but resist the urge to get a hammer and just keep working it and it will come apart. There are lots of YouTube videos on how to do it.

As for other things, replacing the gear oil in the differential is fairly straight forward. Here's a link to a thread that explains it pretty well. Final Drive Oil ????

It's a good idea to change your brake fluid if you don't know how old it is. If it's dark brown it definitely needs to go. Also check your brake pads and replace if necessary. Besides the safety factor, don't let them get to the point where they can gouge your rotors. Pads are cheap - rotors aren't.

It's also a good idea to do a bolt check. Bikes vibrate and nuts and bolts can work themselves loose. It's a good idea to do this once a month or more if you ride on rougher roads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I check the spines on my 1100 whenever I changed the tires. Once you get the wheel free, you just pull it back and down and the driveshaft comes off with it. Then it's just a matter of pulling the differential off the hub. It can be a little tight but resist the urge to get a hammer and just keep working it and it will come apart. There are lots of YouTube videos on how to do it.

As for other things, replacing the gear oil in the differential is fairly straight forward. Here's a link to a thread that explains it pretty well. Final Drive Oil ????

It's a good idea to change your brake fluid if you don't know how old it is. If it's dark brown it definitely needs to go. Also check your brake pads and replace if necessary. Besides the safety factor, don't let them get to the point where they can gouge your rotors. Pads are cheap - rotors aren't.

It's also a good idea to do a bolt check. Bikes vibrate and nuts and bolts can work themselves loose. It's a good idea to do this once a month or more if you ride on rougher roads.
Thanks for the reply. I will definitely heed your advise. As I understand, I shouldn't necessarily disassemble the whole lot for now and just wait until I need a new rear tire?
Also, are there any bolts in particular I should check?
 

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I wouldn't worry about it personally until then, but it's your bike so it's up to you. It's not a big job removing the rear wheel once you've done it a time or two but it's not something you can do in a half hour either. And a second set of hands makes it a lot easier.

Just go around the bike and check any nuts and bolts you can see - fenders, saddlebag mounts, windshield brackets - anything that might be prone to loosening up while driving. You don't necessarily have to go tearing your bike apart, just the ones you can get to fairly easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wouldn't worry about it personally until then, but it's your bike so it's up to you. It's not a big job removing the rear wheel once you've done it a time or two but it's not something you can do in a half hour either. And a second set of hands makes it a lot easier.

Just go around the bike and check any nuts and bolts you can see - fenders, saddlebag mounts, windshield brackets - anything that might be prone to loosening up while driving. You don't necessarily have to go tearing your bike apart, just the ones you can get to fairly easily.
Thanks, that'll keep me busy during quarantine.
All the best.
 

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I have had 5 bikes with well over 50,000 mi and soon a sixth. I have never done this. With 31000 km I wouldn't worry about it.
 
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I'm sorry they may have did it when the dealership changed my tires. But I can't see it having to be done often.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
V-Star 1100 Wiki Knowledge Base hover over the black bar in the upper right corner.read the first section, 'new owner must read'
I assume most of the v
I wouldn't worry about it personally until then, but it's your bike so it's up to you. It's not a big job removing the rear wheel once you've done it a time or two but it's not something you can do in a half hour either. And a second set of hands makes it a lot easier.

Just go around the bike and check any nuts and bolts you can see - fenders, saddlebag mounts, windshield brackets - anything that might be prone to loosening up while driving. You don't necessarily have to go tearing your bike apart, just the ones you can get to fairly easily.
I didn't want to start another thread unnecessarily. I purchased this gearbox oil. It says GL4 but also 75W. Is it the correct oil? The way it is described in the manual is quite confusing.
Much appreciated! I can always take it back to the store if it's incorrect.
 

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to follow up on the advice you already got

you did not say if you have a 650 or 1100?

the final drive splines are lubed for life on these bikes. You should not need to pull them apart and wipe off the expensive 60% moly lube just to put new stuff on. It should last at least 100,000 miles.

The thing you need to worry about is if you have someone else change the rear tire for you, and they pull the wheel off and wipe off the 60% moly, and put axle grease or disk brake grease on the spines instead, the splines will be destroyed in a few thousand miles. So anywhere you take the bike for new tire, make sure they know what they are doing (ASK them if they have drive shaft 60% moly grease.

When you pull the wheel off yourself to take the wheel in for a new tire, definately look at the spline that is exposed (the engine end of the drive shaft, and the big one between the hub and the wheel. If they look worn or dry or shiny clean, or look like red powder, then you have a problem.

The suggestion to check all the bolts and nuts on the bike is a good idea. Dont do it unless you have a torque wrench, and google the factory service manual for your bike (you can find it as free PDF download) and look up the torque specs for everything you are checking. Many of the fasteners on your motorcycle are steel bolts into aluminum, and if you over torque them you will easily strip them out, causing hundreds of dollars in damage. This includes spark plugs and the oil drain plugs.

Ditto on the brake fluid - if its brown replace it, because it has absorbed water and is corroding your master and slave brake cylinders. Its easy to do, just dont let the master reseviour run dry while you are pumping the clean fluid thru. If you get air in it you may have to take it apart to prime it - turning a 15 minute job into a 2 hour nightmare.

another thing I suggest is get a spray can of white lithium grease, and lube your clutch cable, your shift and rear brake linkage (on a 650 with rear drum brakes ) your kick stand, and the throttle cable if you can get to it without pulling things apart
 

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Thanks. So something like this would do I understand? If I seem overly cautious, it's because I'm quite new at this. My apologies.
i'm sorry you had to take it back. i've been buying gear oil since i've been driving and never heard of 75 weight, lately i've been getting synthetic at auto zone and it lasts quite awhile, so the manual calls for 80 or 90 weight i thought i'd play it safe. i would like to hear opinions about using 75...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
to follow up on the advice you already got

you did not say if you have a 650 or 1100?

the final drive splines are lubed for life on these bikes. You should not need to pull them apart and wipe off the expensive 60% moly lube just to put new stuff on. It should last at least 100,000 miles.

The thing you need to worry about is if you have someone else change the rear tire for you, and they pull the wheel off and wipe off the 60% moly, and put axle grease or disk brake grease on the spines instead, the splines will be destroyed in a few thousand miles. So anywhere you take the bike for new tire, make sure they know what they are doing (ASK them if they have drive shaft 60% moly grease.

When you pull the wheel off yourself to take the wheel in for a new tire, definately look at the spline that is exposed (the engine end of the drive shaft, and the big one between the hub and the wheel. If they look worn or dry or shiny clean, or look like red powder, then you have a problem.

The suggestion to check all the bolts and nuts on the bike is a good idea. Dont do it unless you have a torque wrench, and google the factory service manual for your bike (you can find it as free PDF download) and look up the torque specs for everything you are checking. Many of the fasteners on your motorcycle are steel bolts into aluminum, and if you over torque them you will easily strip them out, causing hundreds of dollars in damage. This includes spark plugs and the oil drain plugs.

Ditto on the brake fluid - if its brown replace it, because it has absorbed water and is corroding your master and slave brake cylinders. Its easy to do, just dont let the master reseviour run dry while you are pumping the clean fluid thru. If you get air in it you may have to take it apart to prime it - turning a 15 minute job into a 2 hour nightmare.

another thing I suggest is get a spray can of white lithium grease, and lube your clutch cable, your shift and rear brake linkage (on a 650 with rear drum brakes ) your kick stand, and the throttle cable if you can get to it without pulling things apart
Thank you very much for your extensive reply, KCW. There is no way of knowing what type of grease is on it at the moment so I'll just follow your advice and not worry about it for now. If I ever have to grease the splines I'll make sure it's 60% moly.

I own a 650 btw, forgot to mention that.

What are your thoughts about final drive oil? The store I went to today sold me a 75W one. They said because it mentions API GL4 on the bottle, it is correct. However, after asking on this thread, nick57 recommend taking it back and I think he is right.
As nick mentioned, I'd like to hear other opinions about this as well.
 

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...

What are your thoughts about final drive oil? The store I went to today sold me a 75W one. ...
the thing that worries me, the photo of the 75W bottle shows transmission gears, and it does not say "Hypoid" anywhere on the bottle

the 90° gears in the final drive and differentials are called hypoid gears. There are additives ( EP?) needed because of the way the beveled gears slide and mesh....

its $5 for another bottle of proper 80W90 hypoid gear oil.... its $500 if the 75W eats the gears in the final drive.

I would not be able to sleep at night... its the photo of the straight cut gears on the bottle that would keep me awake.
 

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i see you have a 650, well 650s are notorious for stripping the coupler spline. the differential does cost $500.00 used. the coupler connects the differential and the driveshaft.the 650 guys can tell you more about it than me.you have to pull the wheel and separate the drive unit from the wheel. i would not wait to check it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
the thing that worries me, the photo of the 75W bottle shows transmission gears, and it does not say "Hypoid" anywhere on the bottle

the 90° gears in the final drive and differentials are called hypoid gears. There are additives ( EP?) needed because of the way the beveled gears slide and mesh....

its $5 for another bottle of proper 80W90 hypoid gear oil.... its $500 if the 75W eats the gears in the final drive.

I would not be able to sleep at night... its the photo of the straight cut gears on the bottle that would keep me awake.
Thanks a bunch for that reply. The store will open tomorrow and I'll exchange it then. I'll be careful following advice from this shop since something like this happened multiple times already.
So the bel ray picture I posted does contain the word "hypoid" and 80w90. Am I right to exchange it for that one?
And while on the subject they also recommended this engine oil which I just put in my 650. Considering it was the incorrect gear oil, I'm now worried I might have a wrong engine oil as well. Anyone care to shed some light on this?
 

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