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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to shaft drive bikes and I keep reading how when the rear wheel is off, the splines should get lubed. I've also heard about how easy of a job it is to do.

My 2008 1100 has only 3000kms on the odometer and sat for 3 years before I got it up an running again at the end of last summer which I put on 1200 of those 3000kms.

Due to age, I plan on changing the rear gear oil before I get it back on the road this year and figure that since I also already have rear fender off, I might better remove the rear wheel and grease the splines while I am at it. Will it even need this considering how low mileage is on it?


Assume it should be done, Does anyone have an easy to follow how-to? Is this it?
https://sites.google.com/site/vstar1100kb/home/maintenance-repairs/driveshaft

Because when I read #10 and it talks about removing the rubber boot and how difficult it is, it doesn't sound as easy as I've been reading. Can I get away with just greasing the drive shaft splines and the splines in the rear wheel hub as seen in the picture above #7 and #8?
 

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the drive splines are "greased for life" at the factory

unless you have reason to think a previous owner took the rear wheel off, wiped off the proper 60% moly paste and put axle grease on (which will ruin the splines in about 5000 km), there is no reason to take the wheel off just to lube the shaft drive

Yamaha did a really great job of making the shaft drive maintenance free - all you need to do is change the final drive 80W90 oil every 20k miles or so.

Un Fortunately.... a few VS650 bikes got out of the factory in late 1990s, that were not properly lubed from the factory, or mechanics early on were wiping the 60% moly lube off and putting axle grease on them, and a bunch of drive shaft splines were destroyed in the early 2000 year timeframe. Ever since then people have been skiddish about the "greased for life" claim, and want to lube all the splines everytime they have the back wheel off.

BTW, Its not necessary to take the boot off the back of the transmission to lube that spine - wipe the spline down when its off, put the proper new lube on it, and cram it back in.

Whenever you pull the back wheel off take a good look at the splines. If they look like new and the moly (turns back I think) looks good then put a bit more on the ones that are exposed, and dont worry about the rest, unless you just want to. If the splines are dry and show wear, then get to all of them and inspect and lube.

You also need to be concerned if you take your bike to 6 Finger Jim's Bike Shop to have the back tire replaced. Anyone that is not familiar with shaft drive proper lube cannot be trusted. 60% moly paste IS expensive, some shops dont have it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well that's comforting. No, I doubt any of the PO's during it's 1900K life before I got it did anything to the rear wheel, let alone it's splines. Heck, they barely even rode it!

I'm going to just let it be then and just change the final drive oil, which must be broken down by now even if it's got nearly zero kilometers on it.

thx
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks Nick. That's the link I posted in my original thread. The link which states to remove a rubber boot which also states "is extremely difficult to remove, and must be pried out with considerable force"

Also, KCW says that the issue you talk about was resolved in later model years Yamaha and mine is a 2008 with very low mileage on it and that it's likely not necessary to remove the wheel and do this for the sole purpose of doing it and I can likely safely wait until a tire change is done when the wheel is coming off anyhow.
 

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I would grease the splines if I were you. There are plenty of late model 1100's that have had final drive failures because of lack of maintenance. The tech's at our local Yamaha shop have never used moly on final drives just plain old axle grease. Personally I use Yamaha moly grease which doesn't have as high of moly content as the paste but I grease my final drive every winter. (I like working on my bike in the off season.) How do I know about late model bikes with final drive failures? I bought a 2009 Silverado with 21000 miles that had a toasted final drive. The owner stated that he changed gear oil regularly but never looked at the splines because he was under the impression they were good for life. I bought the bike cheap and got a low mileage final drive off ebay for $110 and pretty much been all I have had to do to the bike except for regular maintenance. It has been super reliable and easy to maintain. Going to amend my first statement. I just saw your bike only has 3000km on it, I would just check it the first time you do a tire change or have the rear wheel removed. Good luck and happy riding!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would grease the splines if I were you. There are plenty of late model 1100's that have had final drive failures because of lack of maintenance. The tech's at our local Yamaha shop have never used moly on final drives just plain old axle grease. Personally I use Yamaha moly grease which doesn't have as high of moly content as the paste but I grease my final drive every winter. (I like working on my bike in the off season.) How do I know about late model bikes with final drive failures? I bought a 2009 Silverado with 21000 miles that had a toasted final drive. The owner stated that he changed gear oil regularly but never looked at the splines because he was under the impression they were good for life. I bought the bike cheap and got a low mileage final drive off ebay for $110 and pretty much been all I have had to do to the bike except for regular maintenance. It has been super reliable and easy to maintain. Going to amend my first statement. I just saw your bike only has 3000km on it, I would just check it the first time you do a tire change or have the rear wheel removed. Good luck and happy riding!

Thanks. And thanks to Nick for the follow up. That ebay pic did actually help me for when the time comes.

I do find this part of your post quote interesting.

"The tech's at our local Yamaha shop have never used moly on final drives just plain old axle grease"

If find it interesting because the service manual says this about greasing the drive shaft, page 6-14

"Recommended lubricant
Molydenum disulfide grease"

So the local Yamaha Shops Tech's are not following the Service Manual? I get that I have no idea who made and distributed that shop manual and it could actually not be what Yamaha is recommending to use, but that seems odd to me. I think i read somewhere that regular axle grease breaks down far to fast for this type of application. But I'm just an armchair mechanic so I really don't know.
 

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Exactly why I do all the maintenance on my bike and never rely on anyone else. I know the work has been done correctly. I have heard too many horror stories about bikes being "repaired or maintained" at the dealership. Not saying they are all unreliable and if you have a good mechanic you are golden but I like knowing exactly what has been done to my bike. It is one of the reasons I like the 1100 so much, easy to work on and maintain.
 

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I bought a 2005 v star 650 with 17,000 miles on it. The former owner could not confirm or deny any maintenance had been done beyond oil and filter changes. When I pulled the drive shaft out, I could see the shaft had been greased but with chassis grease not molly lube. Fortunately, no damage had been done. While inspecting the swing arm bearings, I found chassis grease had also been used to pack the bearings resulting in both bearings and races losing the hard face. My experience is something you may want to consider when trying to decide whether to do maintenance or not.
 

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The problem with axle grease is the spinning shafts throw the grease off quickly, it does not stick in place because of the centrifugal force, and the moly is not 'crushed' out from between the gear teeth.

If you pulled your shaft drive completely apart everytime you replaced your rear tire (10,000 miles?) you might get away with using something other than the moly paste, but why do that? If you then sold the bike to someone else, and they dont keep up with your axle grease ritual, the drive shaft is toast.

I said before, the stuff is expensive. I got the Loctite version, they call it anti seize paste, the link posted early in this thread calls out the Loctite version part number. I got an 8oz bottle from amazon for $30 to $35.

Its not cheap, until you compare it to replacing all the splines.

BTW, dont forget the spline inside the wheel hub, the big one.
 
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