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Which one?

  • Heated grips+handlebar muffs

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • Heated gloves

    Votes: 3 42.9%
  • Heated grips+hand deflectors+light gloves

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Alternate hands on cylinder heads

    Votes: 3 42.9%

  • Total voters
    7
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Discussion Starter #1
Now that cold weather has arrived it is time to invest in some cold weather gear. I cannot decide between heated grips or gloves. I live in central NC so temps are gonna be above 32 when I am riding. I also have some handlebar muffs that I use but they don't look the best so I am trying not to use them but they do help a lot! I don't like bulky gloves because of the restrictive movement and that "bulkiness" feel. I have a few options. I can go with heated grips+muffs and be okay but would rather stay away from muffs. I can get a good set of heated gloves if someone has tried any that doesn't restrict movement and isn't too bulky and doesn't slide on the grips. OR I can get heated grips with hand deflectors and light gloves. Let me know what yall use and would recommend.
 

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Now that cold weather has arrived it is time to invest in some cold weather gear. I cannot decide between heated grips or gloves. I live in central NC so temps are gonna be above 32 when I am riding. I also have some handlebar muffs that I use but they don't look the best so I am trying not to use them but they do help a lot! I don't like bulky gloves because of the restrictive movement and that "bulkiness" feel. I have a few options. I can go with heated grips+muffs and be okay but would rather stay away from muffs. I can get a good set of heated gloves if someone has tried any that doesn't restrict movement and isn't too bulky and doesn't slide on the grips. OR I can get heated grips with hand deflectors and light gloves. Let me know what yall use and would recommend.
IMHO: Having had both... Gloves.

Heated grips heat the inside of your hands. Gloves keep the whole hand warm, including the 'leading edge' that will always be cold with inadequate gloves, heated grips or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IMHO: Having had both... Gloves.

Heated grips heat the inside of your hands. Gloves keep the whole hand warm, including the 'leading edge' that will always be cold with inadequate gloves, heated grips or not.
After researching all day. I ended up buying the fly ignitor pro gloves. They have a sport bike look to them which I am not very fond of, but for what they offer it's a steal. Windproof/waterproof, silicone on palm and fingers for grip, battery-powered heat that covers the whole hand plus fingers. Battery last 4 hours on low, 3.5 on medium and 2.5 on high. These are less bulky compared to some others. I like that does not have a wire because I know my vstar amps are probably maxed out after installing speakers and lights and a phone charger. Also, I can use these snowboarding etc. Got them for $179 off of revzilla. Replacement batteries are only $25 so for long trips I will just switch them out. Can't wait to try them out.
 

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this year i'm going with battery heated gloves + deflectors. i'd guess my deflectors (knucklewarmers.com) probably feels like they save me between 10-20 degrees of cold on the highway. they block out the vast majority of cold wind blowing on my hands. and i got a cheap pair of heated gloves last year but only got one chance to use them. in my one test, i was very happy with the comfort and feel especially for only spending $50. i'm saving them for temps below 40.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
if they haven't shipped yet, they are only $161 on cyclegear but that sale ends today.
Already shipped :| What is the name of the heated gloves you have? My dad was looking for a cheaper pair. BTW you can get those deflectors for $20 on ebay or amazon. My dad and I have some and they look the exact same. Or for the same price as the knucklewarmers you can get hippo hands I believe is what they are called and they are really really nice and specific for your model bike. But the cheap ones do work very well, my dad uses them behind his fairing and we have been riding in 40-50 degree weather and he doesn't need gloves.
 

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i guess i paid $65, but free shipping.

http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/11-general-bike-talk/94346-cool-cold-clothing-6.html

what i like about my knucklewarmers is that they are easily adjustable and easy to take on and off and don't get in the way of any of my controls or moving my hands around. the only cheap deflectors i've seen on amazon are plastic guards that don't look like they would deflect as much as mine which surrounds my entire hands.
 

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Gloves offer a reasonable level of dexterity however having the fingers separated reduces warmth. Mittens are much warmer but are a trade-off when it comes to holding the grips and using the levers. I have a pair of milsurp mittens (like the ones in the pic) that I split down the middle and stitched to separate the index/middle finger pairs from the ring/pinky fingers much like the old East German military motorcycle gloves you can still buy from milsurp suppliers. They are very warm and allow me to grip the handlebars yet use the levers naturally.

 

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I have a couple pairs of gloves for when its below 40F

one pair is split leather with a fleece lining - got them at Walmart for about $10, and I like them the best.

Got a pair of new Harley-D winter gloves for $20 from the Goodwill store, lists on the Harley website for $100. They are like snowmobile gloves. They keep my hands a bit warmer, but they are really bulky.

When riding with heavy gloves I cant feel the clutch lever very well, it does not slide across my fingers the same. I totally lose my confidence pulling away from a light, or out into traffic.

Having said all that, the best thing is to get your hands behind the wind deflection of a windshield, or get grip wind deflectors. The windshield does not have to cover the grips, it throws the air out sideways and very little wind hits your hands.

Since the weather turns cold so quickly in upstate NY, having cold weather gear means you get to ride maybe another 10 days a year instead of driving the car when its below 40F. In that light its not really worth it for me to spend a couple hundred dollars to ride another 10 days - Im already riding 120 days a year. The weather goes from 50s to below 40F, to snow, in about 2 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Gloves offer a reasonable level of dexterity however having the fingers separated reduces warmth. Mittens are much warmer but are a trade-off when it comes to holding the grips and using the levers. I have a pair of milsurp mittens (like the ones in the pic) that I split down the middle and stitched to separate the index/middle finger pairs from the ring/pinky fingers much like the old East German military motorcycle gloves you can still buy from milsurp suppliers. They are very warm and allow me to grip the handlebars yet use the levers naturally.

I actually thought about that, but being that comfort and dexterity was very important to me. I decided with the gloves.
Bevo1981: https://www.amazon.com/Waterproof-Motorcycle-HandleBar-Winter-Thermal/dp/B0158I9KGI/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1511883772&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=handlebar+muffs&psc=1

KCW: That is cold! Hopefully, I won't be riding in anything that cold! I've messed around with thick gloves and riding gloves but to get the warmth they had to be really bulky which I hate.
 

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... I've messed around with thick gloves and riding gloves but to get the warmth they had to be really bulky which I hate.
I guess you just get used to the bulk, kinda like what guys had to deal with in the olden days when they had to use sheep intestine as a 'prophylactic'.
 

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Gerbing microwire heated gloves. I've ridden as low as 10 degrees F for over an hour and hands were warm.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
i actually looked at that item yesterday. if i didn't have mine, i would definitely try those out, but i'm skeptical of the low price. let us know how they work out for you.
They work good. I used them the other day I rode 80mph for a little over an hour in 41 degree weather and used only some real light gloves that are made out of neoprene. Hands got a slight chill, but nothing close to being bad enough to pull over and put on thicker gloves. I have some gaps in mine where it wraps around the brake cylinder and the mirrors. I could most likely fix it with some ingenuity but since I'm getting the new gloves I don't need to:grin: My dad uses his muffs behind his fairing and doesn't even need gloves. We rode interstate 70-80 mph for a little less than an hour in around 45 degree temps and he said his hands were still not chilly or cold. If you have a fairing and handlebars that the fairing covers, get these and your hands will be great! My fairing doesn't cover my hands so obviously they let in more wind.
 

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In SoCal I ride year round to work n back and today was one of the coldest mornings of the year, roughly 50 when I left, so about 38-40 due to wind chill at 70+ mph.

I installed some Oxford Heated Grips last year and they work great, I ran them at 50% most of the ride, tried bumping it up to 70% and they got too hot, so I bumped it back down.

On "cooler" mornings in the summer months when I leave my bigger gauntlet gloves packed away I will sometimes run it on 20 or 30% to just warm them up a little bit. Because it is quite a bit warmer on my ride home in the afternoon I bring my lighter gloves for the ride home. The gauntlets are nice because they go over the jacket sleeves and keep air out of the sleeves, but in the afternoon I want air to get up in there.

This is an odd time of year for me, I bundle up for the ride to work and strip down for the ride home.
 

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Picked up a BMW R1200RT and have been riding in the cold with the heated grips (and heated seats). I stand by my earlier comment, heated gloves are better. The grips actually get hot enough that I have to turn them down, but the heated gloves do a much better job keeping my fingertips warm. The heated seat is pretty sweet (as my 21 year old would say) though on rides < 30 deg. F.
 

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I am presently asking that same question on a facebook site here in my region of northern Quebec where it's often quite cool....especially at night. Most of the riders up here say they use heated grips. To me, this is the last solution. I guess that due to the fact that on the average, each family has a snowmobile and heated grips are almost a must for snowmobilers.

I like the idea of the handlebar muffs and gloves which is also the least expensive solution.
 
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