Yamaha Starbike Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I been looking for an anwser to this and can't find it...
we( a friend that restores vintage bikes and is a bike mechanic and my self) took my bike apart to do the starter clutch. the balance puller broke and the crank moved of timing on us :(

Were having a problem getting the cams timed to the crank seem to be a Lil off each time. We been messing with the timing for 3 hours..
yes we have the shop manual but still eludes us can some one let us know we're we gotta get to please
were at our wits end unfortunately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
I just put the starter clutch in on my bike. I have a clymers manual as well. Make sure to remove the spark plugs, it will make turning the engine over MUCH easier if you haven't already done so. Make sure to mark the edge of the tooth on either side of the timing mark so you can locate the mark as you install the flywheel. Also if you haven't already make sure you have removed the rear cam sprocket cover from the cylinder head. Now throw the flywheel nut on the crankshaft and bar over the engine a few times until the woodruff key on the crankshaft aligns with the dot on the cam chain drive assembly. (the gear just up and to the right of the crankshaft) While doing this, the rear cam sprocket also has a single dot on it(it's timing mark. It lines up with a sharp pointer on the rear cylinder head. You will have to bar it over a few times for them to align. Once they are both aligned your good to put on your starter clutch. Make sure you have found the T mark on the flywheel and marked it with something like a paint marker. After you have it on put the alternator cover back on and see if the flywheel aligns through the cut out in the alternator cover. Let me know if your still having issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
By doing that ( lining up the crank shafts with the back cylinder) will the front cylinder be in sync?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Here's your checklist.

1. make sure the timing gear is in line on the flywheel assembly
2. align the dot on the cam chain drive assembly( the gear just up and to the right of the crankshaft) with the woodruff key( the small metal key that's seated on the crankshaft).
While doing this you have to have eyes on the rear cam sprocket. If it's out of line then you must continue to bar it over. It will take a few times barring it over to align it.
3. install the flywheel assembly
Now when your putting the flywheel back on it wont fully seat until you align the small gear behind the cam chain drive. to do this take a phillips head small enough to fit in that hole and pry it up and then push the flywheel assembly in
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
If I remember correctly my 2003 wouldn't line up correctly with the single dot on the cam chain drive either so I aligned it with the 2 dots. It's the only way it would line up with timing. I checked and re-checked the alignment and everything was perfect on mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
As long as the woodruff key is aligned with the two dots and the rear cam sprocket is in line with the timing mark your golden. Then put on your flywheel and align the T with the notch in the alternator cover. I don't know why it wouldn't align with the single dot but that gear only moves so far. In the manual it states this..

"When the rear cylinder is set to TDC on the compression stroke, the timing mark on the cam sprocket may not precisely align with the pointer on the cyclinder head. On some models, the camshafts are slightly retarded. The mark could be off by as much as 1/2 tooth." So the rear cam sprocket may not be perfect. BUT as long as that rear cylinder is at top dead center and your flywheel assembly T mark is in line with the notch in the alternator cover your good. Let me know if your able to get it aligned
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Good Man, glad to hear it. The manual isn't accurate on the one dot alignment on the cam chain drive. I'm sure some of the v-stars will do it but clymer needs to fix that or clarify. Anyhow, that's the only way it will align is with the 2 dots. TDC is the main goal on the rear head so as long as that's achieved and the flywheel assembly aligns its smooth sailing from there. Ride on brother!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Hello Gurus,

I just did this job and my timing still feels off. Through the exhaust I'm hearing a baffle sound, almost like when you have one car window down and it bounces all around..but not quite that annoying. It's SUPER poppy too and that bike has always been smooth.

I took pix of my timing alignment. I'm totally stumped:





Any ideas?!?!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Did you check the other sides timing as well? You need to check timing on both sides.


Hello Gurus,

I just did this job and my timing still feels off. Through the exhaust I'm hearing a baffle sound, almost like when you have one car window down and it bounces all around..but not quite that annoying. It's SUPER poppy too and that bike has always been smooth.

I took pix of my timing alignment. I'm totally stumped:





Any ideas?!?!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,696 Posts
One thing that is unusual about V Star bikes is that most (maybe all of them) run the motor backwards compared to just about every other MC.

A motorcycle usually has the flywheel and crankshaft spinning in the same direction as the front wheel, to increase the gyroscopic effect and make the bike as self balancing as possible.

I know my VS 650 spins the motor backwards - from the left side of the bike, the motor turns clockwise at the crankshaft.

If you are trying to align the timing marks and you are spinning the crank in the same direction that the front wheel turns, the slack in the chain tensioner will pull the cam off from the crank.

So bottom line rotate the crank clockwise from the left side of the bike. I can only speak for certain on the 650, but check your service manual for your bike to be sure (that does not look like a 650 cam gear).

Most people never even think about this, because nearly all motorcycles spin the engine the same direction as the wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
I would always check rotation using the starter. I haven't done any work on a bike in this area yet, but that is the normal method for lawnmowers I have always used, they can spin all different directions, and be facing all kinds of ways.

Actually, on my first bike, I always forget about, kz400, checked it using the kickstarter. I totally gutted that thing, it was a barn find, that wasn't in a barn. Totally rebuilt, but never put it on the road, cause I didn't want to street legal it with all the lights and exhaust. I was only 17 anyways.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top