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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
G'Day all.

Any advice here appreciated.

I have an old 98 V Star that I have just restored, however the front disc brakes have started leaking brake fluid. I have the tech' manual and would appear the caliper piston seals need replacing. These seals were in the bike when I bought it so I don't know how long they have been in for.

With brakes being such an important component, would it be foolish of me to try and replace these seals myself. I am not a mechanic by trade but worked with and performed basic services on hydraulic spreaders/shears/rams used for rescue purposes but that was a long time ago, and I remember there being procedures for purging hydraulic lines after seal replacements.

Thanks in advance.
 

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While the seals are easy to get, the calipers are not covered in depth in the VStar maintenance manual. You might need to get a CMM (Component Maintenance Manual) for the caliper. You'll need the brand and model number. You might be able to get that off the part itself, or you might need to contact your dealer. Having said that The only calipers I have rebuilt were on a Ford Explorer. I have rebuilt many types of hydraulic brakes over the years. The earliest were '48 Willys Drum and the latest were 2002 Ford Explorer. It's not that difficult of a job with the proper tools. First and foremost if I were going to do this job, I would get a manual and read through it to see if my/your abilities match up against the job.

Bleeding the brakes after you finish is the easy part of the job. since its a closed system you just open the bleeder and push the air out. More on that later if you decide to do it.
 

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G'Day all.

Any advice here appreciated.

I have an old 98 V Star that I have just restored, however the front disc brakes have started leaking brake fluid. I have the tech' manual and would appear the caliper piston seals need replacing. These seals were in the bike when I bought it so I don't know how long they have been in for.

With brakes being such an important component, would it be foolish of me to try and replace these seals myself. I am not a mechanic by trade but worked with and performed basic services on hydraulic spreaders/shears/rams used for rescue purposes but that was a long time ago, and I remember there being procedures for purging hydraulic lines after seal replacements.

Thanks in advance.
Good job on your new avatar:cool: That being said, if you are a wee bit mechanicaly inclined,(and you seem to be) common sense plays a great role in fixing your own stuff, a=b+c ect. Total loss on this end on the electronic part, but hard parts are really simple if you give it some thought. Had a big drag(non release) on my old '82 750 a couple years ago, took off, cleaned up, blew out, bled, then just like new(surprised myself on that one:p)

Just saying you can really do more than you think you can with some thought and a bit of effort:cool::D Good luck with your project. ride safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fulltilt, Sugar Bear, thanks for that, its give me a lot more to go with now. I will definately tread carefully.

Sugar Bear, thanks for compliment on the Avatar. It is one of our rare one's now, a big red kangaroo, our National Icon. Most of the roo's you see now are grey and smaller.

Thanks again fella's
 

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One thing I would suggest before you even buy the parts is to attempt to open the bleeder valves. I spent quite a few years as an auto/truck/heavy equipment mechanic and I can't tell you how many times the bleeders were frozen shut and would just break off when you attemp to bleed the system. If you can't crack them open then just replace the caliper.


:)
 

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Avatar. It is one of our rare one's now, a big red kangaroo, our National Icon.
I read some where that the imported beer tuck a BIG toll on the BIG RED's :eek:
As for the breaks, just do it:D It is not hard at all. Put in new fluid, copper washers, 30min and a 6pack should do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
One thing I would suggest before you even buy the parts is to attempt to open the bleeder valves. I spent quite a few years as an auto/truck/heavy equipment mechanic and I can't tell you how many times the bleeders were frozen shut and would just break off when you attemp to bleed the system. If you can't crack them open then just replace the caliper.


:)
Thanks Mole2 for the good advice, always plenty of good advice from everyone, cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I read some where that the imported beer tuck a BIG toll on the BIG RED's :eek:
As for the breaks, just do it:D It is not hard at all. Put in new fluid, copper washers, 30min and a 6pack should do it.
Thanks Dan.

And if those big red roo's play up, we turn their kegs into souvenirs, no joke. Maybe we can organise one of these as a prize for the winner of the BOTM. Anyone after a new bottle opener or cigarette lighter? Photo submitted for consideration by Senior Member Dan:D

 
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