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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a 950 and my wife and I have just started riding together. While the 950 is a good bike to go on short trips (< 3 hours), I wouldn't want to ride any longer without additional comfort for her. And she's begging for armrests or grips. Hanging on to the sissy bar is not her idea of fun.

Now, I know that a transition to a tourer at this point would be unwise. I love to ride and treat every ride like it was my very first. And with my wife with me, I'm even more careful.

I know I need more experience. But what I'd like to know is how much riding experience did you feel you had to have before transitioning into a tourer such as this? I'm 5' 5" (pushing 5' 6"), 170 lbs and the Royal looks to be a great bike and one I can put my feet on the ground as well.

And whose still using cassettes in 2010? I was floored when I saw that the Royal still has a cassette player. :)

Regards,

Mike
 

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How tall is your sissy bar? My wife has very little experience on a bike and has no problem leaning back on the pad and sitting still. Never feels the need to hang on to anything. The only thing she would like is for the pillion to be a bit bigger....I'm working on that.;) BTW....mine is an 1100.

As far as the tourer....I'd suggest taking it for a test ride alone. See for yourself if you're comfortable with it. Maybe try it in traffic a little, a few tight corners in a parking lot, stopping slow and fast, and backing it as if parking it.

If you feel comfortable with it....go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The sissy bar is the standard Yamaha 1" round bar. The backrest pad hits her about middle of her back.

She's fine leaning back, but wants armrests. I've checked out the "Love Handles", but $350 - $400? Really? How come everything for a bike has to be so darn expensive. And they also sell sissy bar extendenders for this sissy bar, which may not be a bad idea.

While I like some of the creature comforts of the Venture, I think the 950 has plenty of power and certainly fits my price range. If only aftermarket folks would get their act together and start putting out better accessories for these bikes.

I'm getting the impression in the after-market arena, that the 950 is like the red headed step-child of the Star lineup.
 

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The sissy bar is the standard Yamaha 1" round bar. The backrest pad hits her about middle of her back.

She's fine leaning back, but wants armrests. I've checked out the "Love Handles", but $350 - $400? Really? How come everything for a bike has to be so darn expensive. And they also sell sissy bar extendenders for this sissy bar, which may not be a bad idea.

While I like some of the creature comforts of the Venture, I think the 950 has plenty of power and certainly fits my price range. If only aftermarket folks would get their act together and start putting out better accessories for these bikes.

I'm getting the impression in the after-market arena, that the 950 is like the red headed step-child of the Star lineup.
LOL....don't know about that, but yea...accessories can get way out of hand.
 

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$$$$$

Believe Ol Sugar Bear, it ain't just the 950's that the extras are obscene, an oil fill cap for my Silverado was 42 bucks:eek::eek::eek:
from the local Yamaha stealer, for a $5 dollar part! I like the shiney sparkle things as well as the next guy, but lets get real. A piece of crome the size of a silver dollar, about 100 bucks. For a poor country boy, that is out of sight. Don't have any answers for it, just the way it is. Just wanted to say you are not alone with this super hyper cost for assy stuff.Have fun and Ride Safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Finally sat on a Venture

Was out an about on Friday and stopped in at local Yamaha dealer. They've got a pretty good used inventory selection and there were a variety of bikes to swing my leg over on. Sat on a Stratoliner, a Goldwing, a few Harley's (Ultra glide's), A Kawasaki Vulcan Voyager and finally the Road Star Venture.

Let me say now, that my 5' 5" frame was having considerable trouble just getting it off the side stand. It is very top heavy (at least to me), and I can not see me trying to get my wife on this and cruise down the road. It's a beautiful bike, but one I don't think fits me. I can say the same for the Voyager as well; another top heavy bike.

I was very pleasantly surprised at the balance and seat height of the Goldwing. Very, very nice. I liked the bar position and it felt very comfortable. And, the Harley's were also balanced well, with a nice layout on the fairing.

So, in conclusion, for now I will stick with my 950. Miles are miles and I will enjoy each one no matter what I'm riding, but at least I know now what "feels" right to me. Of course, there's actual handling/peformace but that will have to wait for a future date.
 

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Hang on

I see most passengers do hold onto the sissy bar. But it is not in a good posotion for that. My Wife just holds onto me. Seems to work well.

I have considered a custom back rest that wraps around a little. Like the ones on some trunks.

I did also spring for a wider thicker passenger seat and floor boards. Cruisers will never have a comfortable passenger seat but some improvements cane be made.

The Venture and BMW are a little top heavy. The only place this is a problem is at very low speed or stopped. Not a problem on the road. We have a Stratoliner. I have said if I spring for a touring bike I would keep the Liner for me. I would stop and let the wife off before I park the bike when riding the touring bike. I think you would need a few months experience before making a move to a touring bike.

Dave
 

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My wife just sits back realxed with her hands on her thighs. I usually reach back once in a while to make sure she's still on (Stratoliner-S). When she holds onto me, it's her signal for me to kick it up a notch or two.
 

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Experience

Rider Training Trumps Riding Experience

A new study utilizing a motorcycle simulator has found that formal advanced training is better than the school of hard knocks.
The center for Motorcycle Ergonomics & Rider Human Factors in England Investigated the attitudes, behaviors and skills of different types of rider (novice,experience,and those that had advanced training).

While experience seems to help develop rider skills to an extent, advance training appears to develop deeper levels of awareness, perception and responsibility. It also appears to make riders better urban riders and quicker, smoother and safer riders in rural setting.

That's what the NATIONAL COLLATION OF MOTORCYCLES reported.
 

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My wife just sits back realxed with her hands on her thighs. I usually reach back once in a while to make sure she's still on
Same here. When we rode the Virago, it was kinda cramped and I could rest my hand on her knee. Now with the 1100 I actually have to reach back to check on her (she's 5'1"). She likes to snooze back there, too :).
 

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i might consider the advanced rider course if we didn't have to use our own bikes. the one thing that i wasn't able to do well was those figure 8 drills. i couldn't stay in the box without having to put my feet down. so if i have to use my own bike for the advanced stuff, i don't want to risk laying it down.
 

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i might consider the advanced rider course if we didn't have to use our own bikes. the one thing that i wasn't able to do well was those figure 8 drills. i couldn't stay in the box without having to put my feet down. so if i have to use my own bike for the advanced stuff, i don't want to risk laying it down.
I'll bet by the end of the day you will be able to do it. I went through the advanced and passed it all and had a great time and learned quite a bit. The figure 8's were not that hard, the one handed offset slalom course was harder to get used to.

Besides it you do well in all other aspects, you can go outside the box and still pass the test. and if you have a valid license already, it does not matter, you are just there for the experience anyway.
 

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I'll bet by the end of the day you will be able to do it. I went through the advanced and passed it all and had a great time and learned quite a bit. The figure 8's were not that hard, the one handed offset slalom course was harder to get used to.

Besides it you do well in all other aspects, you can go outside the box and still pass the test. and if you have a valid license already, it does not matter, you are just there for the experience anyway.
i don't care about passing any test. if i'm gonna push the boundaries of what i'm comfortable with in order to improve my skills, i'm not about to risk it on my own bike. the course here requires you to use your own bike. i'd rather they provided the same 250's that the beginner riding course uses so then i won't care if i have to lay it down during a drill
 

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I see most passengers do hold onto the sissy bar. But it is not in a good posotion for that. My Wife just holds onto me. Seems to work well.

I have considered a custom back rest that wraps around a little. Like the ones on some trunks.

I did also spring for a wider thicker passenger seat and floor boards. Cruisers will never have a comfortable passenger seat but some improvements cane be made.

The Venture and BMW are a little top heavy. The only place this is a problem is at very low speed or stopped. Not a problem on the road. We have a Stratoliner. I have said if I spring for a touring bike I would keep the Liner for me. I would stop and let the wife off before I park the bike when riding the touring bike. I think you would need a few months experience before making a move to a touring bike.

Dave
I find the Venture much less top heavy than the BMW or the Goldwing..And actually at slow speeds it is not bad at all once you get rid of the stock front tire and go with a better tire (E3, Venom, or Commander) in a 130 size.
 

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I have to second the Advanced Rider Course. In the military, you can't get on base if you haven't taken in. When my hubs got his first bike (a 250), they only had to take the beginner's course (and, similarly provided a bike). When he came back from his last tour, we bought a HD 1200 and they required the Advanced course (on your bike). I was a little nervous for the same reasons on our brand new bike, but he said he picked it up pretty quick (granted, the sportster is a much smaller sized bike). In the end, that experience and knowledge has definitely paid off for us, especially moving up to a larger sized bike.
 

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[Riding that 250 is not the same as your 950 etc.[/QUOTE]

That is so true.....

I started my wife out on a 650 suzuki....a bit older bike, she did an amizing job I just bought her a 950 V Star, new and she took to it like a duck on water...she is running circles around me. Oh My...

Mark
 
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