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Discussion Starter #1
Hey members, Just wanted some info on the 650 rectifier .

I rode my bike last weekend and trying to start it today for a ride the battery was low. No start.

I have not changed the battery or Rectifier since I've had it ( 1 year)
Was told the battery was about a year old ( would be 2 now )

So how do you know if the rectifier needs to be replaced ?

I have heard it is common to replace it when the battery gets changed.

Update : I charged the battery and rode for a good 12 miles or so.
Bike started right back up no problem. I'm going to try it again in the morning and see if it's holding charge.

Any help on this would be sweet...

jake :D
 

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Just do a voltage test.... your shop manual should tell you where it should be. I know the 1100 should be 12.8 at idle and about 14.6 at 3000 RPM, not sure about the 650
 

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Thanks Mick, I do have the shop manual and will take a look at what it shows in terms of tests related to this. Normally the bike has sat for a week and will crank right up. So this is new.

I will keep the board posted on what the out come is.

jake :):D
 

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You may want to have the battery load tested too....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great idea, I have a load tester at work I can hook it to.

The battery is an interstate AGM. But no date code is on it.
I can only assume it's actual age. Plus the bike sat a lot while
going through the paint job. Rather then risk a no start away from the house I would rather check into another battery.

What is a good reliable brand of AGM thats not too expensive ?

I saw a few for $60 but is that a lot or a good deal...
 

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I've had great luck with Yuasa and Scorpion. Check your local retailers and Batterystuff.com....and I'm sure there are a lot of others selling batteries. Don't be afraid to spend a fair amount on one. You usually get what you pay for.
 

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Since you say the battery is an Interstate AGM, I'd take it to the Interstate battery outlet. They can undoubtedly figure out the date code, and test the battery too.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys for the info. All of this will be determined by what this battery does. If not holding a charge or my rectifier took a dump.

I need to check up stream from the battery first, Then if need be purchase a new battery and a tender with a charge light.

My current one has no lights so it's hard to tell what it's doing.
And it's only 500 ma. Trickle and old.
 

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Charging

Resto-A bad or weak battery can stress the charging diodes by drawing maximum charging current all the time and overheating occurs. While the engine is running(idling), and you can read at least 14v on the DC meter at the battery terminals, the charger is working correctly and I wouldn't replace it. This may take a few seconds to build to 14v and that's OK. Charger/regulators are generally very durable these days and will take some hard use as long as they are not shorted or wired incorrectly in the first place. My2cts.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well on these bikes the battery is not charging at idle speeds.

We are working on the problem and will report back soon with more details...

thanks
 

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Usually, service manuals say you have to have a fully charged battery or the test results may not be valid. It is fairly common for charging systems to have insufficient voltage to charge batteries at idle speeds, which is why service manuals usually specify some higher engine speed, say 3000 rpm, to test charging. You can often observe this by noticing the headlight getting a little brighter when the engine speed is raised above idle.

If your charger is old, as you say, and is a trickle charger instead of a "smart" charger, it will kill the battery if left on for long times (days or weeks). It will continue to force current through the fully-charged battery, and will eventually cause the water in the electrolyte to dissociate and be lost. Unless there is some way in which you can add the water back, the battery is toast.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No I have not used it that long or very much. I did put the battery back on the big charger 2 amp AGM setting. It started off at about 68% full capacity. So I let it sit for a while and finally went to fully charged at 100%. So I charged it enough to get it started yesterday
and rode for about 12 miles (mixed speeds) came home shut down for the night and checked it at 11 am this morning and it gave me the 68% charged reading. That to me says something is going on that should NOT be... And then it took several hours to charge to full on the 2 amp charge setting.

More investigative work is on the horizon.

jake :D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Update for 4/29 /15

Ok, Well I had charged the battery to full over the weekend and today would have been 3 days sitting. Not on charge. I started it up no problem. I put the multimeter on the leads for the trickle charger to read the battery voltage running. At a very fast idle around 2K rpm the voltage stayed right in the 13.7 volt range. Revving higher netted
a 13.8 volt reading. When shutting down it still read right at 13.0 volts. I have checked the nominal voltage before and was right at
the 12.8 level.

So do these figures seem out of range for this bikes charging system ?
Normal running lights were on. no accessories.
 

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What specs does your shop manual give? It seems a little low. I believe it should be tested at 3000 RPM+. I think it should more more like 14.5 or so at the higher RPM.
 

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I'm working on that. My shop manual flew under something and Now I cannot find it. Must tear the shop up to find it on Saturday. :D
 

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You might want to check the stator output, too. Usually there are three wires of the same color, maybe yellow, coming from the stator to the rectifier/regulator. Disconnect them from the rectifier. You should get continuity using an ohmmeter from any of the three to any of the others. The ohm readings should be about the same. You should NOT get continuity from any of the wires to ground. Start the engine and measure voltage from each wire to one of the others. This will be AC voltage, not DC, and should be several tens of volts. The number that comes to mind is in excess of 70 volts AC at maybe 3000 rpm. Your bike may differ. The voltage across each pair of wires should be about equal to the voltage across any other pair. It will also increase or decrease with engine speed. Be careful, the voltage is high enough to bite you.

I used to have a chain-drive Suzuki. The three-wire cable from the stator to the regulator managed to move in such a way that the chain ate through two of the three wires. I learned about the problem when the battery went dead and I had to troubleshoot it. I mention that because it is possible for a wire to have chafed somewhere and everything else may still be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Charon, Thanks for your input I will take that into consideration.

I'm trying to line up time this weekend for fixin. It's tough.

Guide kit sales has been through the roof. So just keeping up with that is a full time job, And I work a full time job.

Add a possibly sick bike. :( WE'll see.... :D
 
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