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Discussion Starter #1
So my V-Star 1100 sat for just over a year while I was overseas, and I de-wintered it and re-did all the major maintenance points. It started and ran beautifully. So, after I warmed it up, I parked and leveled it and drained the oil and replaced the filter. Put new oil in.

Now, I read all the instructions and I know not to get "Energy Conserving" oil. So, I didn't. I felt confident in my choice of unadulterated oil at the time of purchase, put 3.3 quarts into the engine. But, as I'm dumping my old oil into the now empty containers, I see the SAE logo that *does* read "RESOURCE CONSERVING."

Damn, I bet this is similar enough to "ENERGY CONSERVING" to have the same problems, and sure enough, it looks like it is. Now, the GOOD news is that the engine hasn't been started, let alone driven since this oil made it into the engine. So I'm thinking I can just drain THAT oil and replace it, right? The little bit of residue, especially since it hasn't run and gotten up into the head or filter, shouldn't be a problem...right?

Anyway, I guess I have a few questions. One, are there any other terms or labels I need to watch out for on my next batch of oil? Two, is this stuff really this bad for a cruiser? Everything I see about clutch slippage seems to be sport bikes. And does it just cause performance problems, or does it do actual damage?
 

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You can use most any 10W40, or 20/50 oil in your bike with no problems. most oils in the 30W class have that label, and are noy good for your clutch. I will not hurt your engine, but will make your clutch slip.
 

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The issue with energy saving oil is that it doesn't work well with a bike's clutch pack.

I have read many a case where people put in energy conserving oil and then start experiencing issues with not being able to find neutral and slipping. They drain the old oil, put in new stuff and things get better.

In your situation, I would just drain the oil, pull the oil filter and drain that overnight and put it all back together with good oil.


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No. It's not going to do actual damage.

If you want to be sure next time you buy, look for JASO or JASO-MA on the bottle. Means it meets Japanese standards for motorcycle w/ wet clutch use. Most motorcycle specific oils will have this as well as ROTELLA 5W-40 and 15W-40. Honestly, you'll be fine with any HDEO oil that is 15w-40.

I recommend the 15W-40 for a V-Star 1100.
 

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I've never used a single quart of JASO oil in my bike. After 45,000 miles it looks like brand new inside and and I still have my original clutch with lots of life left. Never had any in the bike I had before that...or the one before that and that was before they came up with this magical JASO-MA rating.

To get the JASO oil certification the oil company pays several million dollars to have one of their existing oils go through the certification. Then you ...the consumer pay that extra fee in a higher price for the same oil that is sitting the next shelf up without JASO MA on the label.

You can be assured there will be no issues with that label....but you can also be assured that almost any oil over 30W (even in multi-grades) will be OK in your bike.
 

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I've never used a single quart of JASO oil in my bike. After 45,000 miles it looks like brand new inside and and I still have my original clutch with lots of life left. Never had any in the bike I had before that...or the one before that and that was before they came up with this magical JASO-MA rating.

To get the JASO oil certification the oil company pays several million dollars to have one of their existing oils go through the certification. Then you ...the consumer pay that extra fee in a higher price for the same oil that is sitting the next shelf up without JASO MA on the label.

You can be assured there will be no issues with that label....but you can also be assured that almost any oil over 30W (even in multi-grades) will be OK in your bike.
any SJ oil is exactly the same as a JASO-MA oil, no difference, it basicly moly that bad for clutches and some motorcycle specific oils have a very small amount of moly in them, amsoil never shows exactly what's in their oil because i'll bet there's a very small amount of moly in it, a small amount actually helps a clutch run smoother it's only oils with higher amounts that are bad for clutches
 

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any SJ oil is exactly the same as a JASO-MA oil, no difference, it basicly moly that bad for clutches and some motorcycle specific oils have a very small amount of moly in them, amsoil never shows exactly what's in their oil because i'll bet there's a very small amount of moly in it, a small amount actually helps a clutch run smoother it's only oils with higher amounts that are bad for clutches
Exactly...and SJ has even been upgraded and you can now get SL, SM and SN....all deserve some reading up on. As you said, as long as one of the viscosity number is above 30, it's usually not "Energy conserving".....and should work fine in your shared sump motorcycle.

All this almost makes you think that owning a Harley would be a lot easier....lol.
 

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I just think it's much easier and tbh, almost all popular brands have MC oil that are JASO certified, to just look for the JASO mark and you know you have a bottle you can use and just avoids newbies or non-mechnical folks wondering if it's the right oil or not. Basically, you don't want anything with friction modifiers in it. So when you run in to Walmart and there's an army of bottles in front of you and you have no idea what is good and what isn't, just make sure it says JASO on it or stick to the manufacturer's recommended Yamalube (which also says JASO on the bottle).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, the good news is that I got the "bad" oil out and leveled the bike and put the perfect amount of "good" oil in. Took it out for about 45 minutes on the open road after that, and it ran great.

Then, today, I put a passenger on and did the same - now I've gotta take the carbs off again, as it's bogging and losing power under load or with the throttle open. Dammit.
 
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