Yamaha Starbike Forum banner

61 - 69 of 69 Posts

·
Registered
2007 XVS1300 Blue and basic
Joined
·
30 Posts
I have visited two motor sports dealers in three years that have have gotten out being a Yamaha product dealer and sold off EVERY thing that resembled a tuning fork. I didn't get into specifics with the proprietors, but understood there was bad feelings involved. If I were CEO, I would start there.
My Yamaha dealer also sells Suzuki, and now you mention it 95% of bikes on the floor where Suzuki. I asked him which one he preferred and he replied all, metrics are good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
Is there any weight in the fact that in the US, Yamaha had some of its best sales when they changed their cruiser line to Star Motorcycles? Seems to me that it's a part of the problem that we are all talking about is that there are too many products marketed under the name Yamaha (Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki all do the same).
Are you implying that I can't tell the difference between my stereo and my motorcycle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
@Stryder1956 here is the USA, we still have the MT 10 if that is what you mean by the MT 01 there. Or is that a different bike? I had the MT 10's predecessor, the FZ1 and loved it greatly. A very forgiving bike when one hit a curve a tad too hot. I am warming up tot he MT 10's design...
View attachment 103712
The MT 01 is a sport bike with the Warrior 1700cc motor in it. I will try to find a picture for you.
103885
 

·
Premium Member
2006 Stratoliner, 2014 Triumph Rocket III Touring, '81 XS650SH Project
Joined
·
1,736 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: faffi

·
Registered
2002 v star 650 custom
Joined
·
570 Posts
How about THIS mandate from the CEO: all future bkes will be in a partnership with some of the better aftermarket parts manufacturers from the BEGINNING. With our (the company/Yamaha Motorsports) detailed knowledge of our bikes, the aftermarket can have their add-ons ready on the 1st day of the bike available to buy.

The company benefits from the free advertising and word of mouth.
Aftermarket benefits from the detailed knowledge instead of LEARNING on the aftermarket's own time and money. And aftermarket also gets free advertising.

This would be big news, and would be published.
The only catch is, if they blow it the 1st time then it would be a total failure.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 Stratoliner, 2014 Triumph Rocket III Touring, '81 XS650SH Project
Joined
·
1,736 Posts
@compjan that doesn't sound good for the bottom line. Why not simply have a better number of add on items for the customer from Yamaha? After all, Yamaha must make money and what better way than convince our customers to buy more of our stuff. That has worked for HD for decades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Not news to anyone, but some Harley Davidson shops offer the MSF Safety Course (required in Texas) right at the shop, and in most cases the course is free to new riders with purchase. Seems to me, that is good advertising not only for the brand but for the shop itself. Yamaha offers multiple entry level bikes for new riders and many that the rider will not outgrow in a few months. Thing is, nobody knows about these. Thats how to get new riders to your brand and I agree with Bill that there is a market for new, young riders. We just have to get them to our brand. Compjan stated, and it's absolutely true, word of mouth advertising is a benefit to any company. Problem is this: I could show off my 2009 V-Star 1100 or my son's 2008 V-Star 1300 and tell them what great bikes either is. However, anyone I could sell these bikes to can no longer go to the local Yamaha shop, or any Yamaha shop and purchase a new version of either of these. On the other hand, I could show someone my 2005 Harley Electra Glide and that person could go to any Harley shop and choose from any of about a dozen like it, brand new, right off the showroom floor. Gaining new customers is important, but I also believe that keeping customers is important as well, and I don't think anyone does more to keep customers than Harley-Davidson. And the truth is, I believe that Yamaha actually does the least to keep its customer base. I have talked to many riders of metric bikes and I have observed that for many of them Yamahondakawazuki is just a stopping point on the way to a Harley. An aftermarket, longer production runs, and more brand centric functions and associations would go a long way to change this.

I'm very curious to know if Yamaha R&D monitors this and other Yamaha related forums and pages to see what the customers say. If I were CEO for a day, doing so would be my first executive order. This would begin within the first minute of my taking office.
 
61 - 69 of 69 Posts
Top