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Okay, to start with, both me and the daughter are ok. She didn't even get a single scratch and I banged up my knee but whatever...We're perfectly fine.

I've owned a bike for about a month or so. I have a steep driveway and I usually just ride it down the hill and go on about my business. Yesterday, something else happened. We had the yard guy here and there was a lot of grass clippings in the drive way. Apparently, I might as well have driven on ice. Back end started to come out, tried to do something about it and decided that since my daughter was on the back, I wasn't going to fight it. I got us into some soft grass and laid it down. We're good and bike is good. We both got back up and decided we needed to complete our task of my daughter's first motorcycle ride and we did.

Here are the questions...
1. Is this a sign that I suck and that motorcycles aren't for me? I mean, one month in, driving to work and stuff multiple days a week and this happens? In my stupid driveway!?
2. Where was the mistake I made?
3. I don't know what's normal for people having accidents like this, dropping a bike, etc. so it right now feels like I need to take this as a sign but, some part of me says this is normal too.

Anyway, thoughts?
 

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First, glad you and daughter are ok. The only error on your part was lack of experience, not meant in a negative way. Grass trimmings can be as slick as ice, you now know first hand. From this experience learn to check road conditions for all hazards. Don't beat your self down. Learn from it. Here is a pretty good quote:
Grass, and grass clippings, are about 85 percent water. And it doesn't matter if those clippings are wet or dry, when they're in the street, experts say they can be a danger to motorcyclists. ... They may slow down, switch lanes, or cross over a double yellow line to avoid grass clippings.Feb 22, 2019
 

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Okay, to start with, both me and the daughter are ok. She didn't even get a single scratch and I banged up my knee but whatever...We're perfectly fine.

I've owned a bike for about a month or so. I have a steep driveway and I usually just ride it down the hill and go on about my business. Yesterday, something else happened. We had the yard guy here and there was a lot of grass clippings in the drive way. Apparently, I might as well have driven on ice. Back end started to come out, tried to do something about it and decided that since my daughter was on the back, I wasn't going to fight it. I got us into some soft grass and laid it down. We're good and bike is good. We both got back up and decided we needed to complete our task of my daughter's first motorcycle ride and we did.

Here are the questions...
1. Is this a sign that I suck and that motorcycles aren't for me? I mean, one month in, driving to work and stuff multiple days a week and this happens? In my stupid driveway!?
2. Where was the mistake I made?
3. I don't know what's normal for people having accidents like this, dropping a bike, etc. so it right now feels like I need to take this as a sign but, some part of me says this is normal too.

Anyway, thoughts?
No it isn't a sign it is a warning or wake up call. It is reminding you not to become complacent in your skills. I had something similar 6 years ago after riding for over 30 years. I was doing a slow uturn with my wife on the back. She started to go down on my left. Almost hitting the new bags. Never hit wife got off got it back up. Didn't realize at the time gave my self a hernia. Live learn and move on.
That was just an oops I'll be embarrassed but ok moment.
 

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It was the first time your bike went down and probably won't be the last.
We're human and we all make mistakes, sometimes due to a lack of experience. Like the old saying: live and learn.
Beginning riders tend to make more mistakes due to a lack of experience. Experience will come in time.
Why do you think teenagers car insurance rates are double an adults?

If you like riding don't give up.
Just practice your riding skills.
You might want to wait a while before riding 2 up (passenger)
I've only been riding for about 9 months after a 30 year layoff from riding. I still will not ride my wife yet. I just don't have the confidence yet. I have pretty good confidence when riding alone I'm just cautious.

You learned that grass is a problem. Also be aware that sand or gravel in the road is just as bad. (Had a friend who lost his foot due to a crash involving sand)
 

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agree with Authentic Poser... avoid passengers til you get a lot more experience. I have been riding for a year now and 1500 miles and still wont consider passengers. I need to spend a lot more time on basic skill practice. If you havent taken an MSF course, do so. I dropped my ride in the first couple of weeks trying figure 8's for the road test. Just touched the rear brake going slow in a corner and I was down in an instant... only bruised my ego. As another member says.. motorcycles are an unforgiving mistress demanding your full and undivided attention. Glad no one was hurt.
 

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I dont remember you saying you took any rider training courses, like the MSF beginners class

usually people take it as an easy way to get their license, in 3 days, and you dont need your own bike.

if you already have your licence you can still sign up for it, you will get 10% off your insurance for the rest of your life

and you will learn skills and information that will keep you from dropping the bike again

if can also find the course material online and download it for free - one of the things you will learn are the things that add risk to riding and how to compensate for them, or how to choose which things to avoid, for example:

moving the bike or moving the kickstand when you are not sitting on the bike
riding in the dark
riding in heavy traffic
riding on multi-lane roads
riding on dirt, gravel, snow, leaves, plastic lane markings
riding, stopping and making U turns up and down steep hills
parking on hills
riding with passengers
riding and drinking
riding with an illness/ fatigue
riding over obstacles and potholes
riding with luggage and baggage

you hit three risks at the same time: Steep hill, passenger, debris on the pavement

Riding on grass is notorious for dropping bikes - even dirt bikes slide and drop on grass. Its ok to park and drive on grass with a car, but not with a bike

the reason your rear tire went sideways when it started to spin is because when it starts to slip the forward force the rear tire is creating is like standing your motorcycle vertical on its front wheel - the steering is going to turn to one side and the back wheel will push out farther and farther

the only way to stop that is to let off the throttle and keep turning the front wheel in the direction of travel - its call drifting on a dirt bike. Its a hard thing to practice and learn on a street bike. Its something to avoid and to kill as soon as it starts.

If you feel sketchy riding now get a crash bar for the front of the bike, stop riding with passengers till you get your skill level up, and be aware of all the riding risks and how to handle them.
 

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PS riding a motorcycle is kinda like sailing. Sooner or later almost everyone drops a bike. You live in fear of the unknown until it happens, but for most people once it happens it wasnt so bad and you learn the mistake and how to deal with it.

Same thing with sailing, you are in fear of capsizing a small boat, worry you will not be able right it and make it back to shore - so you sail timidly until you do - then you find out its not so bad, and get over it.
 

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First time I dropped my street bike I was stopped at a Shoney’s for breakfast with the in-laws. I had just pulled into a spot, put my feet down and was about to get it on the center stand when my left foot went right out from under me...down went the bike on it’s left side.

Didn’t realize I had put my foot down onto some motor oil and it had drizzled just a bit this’ll at morning and so the oil had come out of the pavement and was like ice. That was probably 25 years ago, I still look at what I’m putting my feet on and the first few minutes of a rain storm still make me very observant and cautious of any little spot of oil.

I think the takeaway for me would be everyone is safe, the bikes safe, don’t let the bruise to the ego make you think it’s anything other than learning. When I was a ski instructor my motto with my students and my family was “if you aren’t falling, you aren’t learning”. I don’t recommend “falling” on your bike but these times that we go outside our normal experience and find something new like hey, grass clippings are slick, we just need to learn from it and add it to the base of knowledge that we ride with every time we get on the bike.

I can say anytime I see someone mowing grass and blowing the trimmings on the road it makes me mad, but I’ll also go to the other side of the road to avoid them, same with leaves on the road if they are thick.


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OK,First let me start off with a little humor for a bad situation, The odds of you dropping your motorcycle increases with the number of people who will see you do it.:ROFLMAO:

I am not a beginner rider , I have been riding for 54 yrs, I raced professional motoX, I road trials, I raced a 1000 cc alcohol Harley Dragster, I have no idea how many miles I have ridden, yet I laid the VStar 650 down in the front yard last summer, not paying attention and hit the brick sidewalk wrong and had the bike laying on my leg. It happens, any one who says they have never laid a bike down, either hasn't been riding very long or they are lying to you. Don't let laying a bike down once on fresh cut grass stop you from riding , just be glad you have that first time over, no one was hurt and the bike wasn't damaged. Now you can say you have joined the brotherhood of the rest of us who have laid a bike down.(y)
 

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Thanks for sharing. We've all done it. Check out the slow speed skills videos on youtub. (McRider, Dandanthefireman, Jerry Palladino, Motojitsu...). Get out and practice. This Fall maybe try a passenger--with full gear on. When you're ready..ride safe, ride on!
 

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Here are the questions...
1. Is this a sign that I suck and that motorcycles aren't for me? I mean, one month in, driving to work and stuff multiple days a week and this happens? In my stupid driveway!?
2. Where was the mistake I made?
3. I don't know what's normal for people having accidents like this, dropping a bike, etc. so it right now feels like I need to take this as a sign but, some part of me says this is normal too.

Anyway, thoughts?
1. happens to everybody
2. can't tell. maybe you didn't. sounds like you made a good decision since all is good.
3. The only time I remember laying my honda down when I was in the air force was in my own sandy front yard and, of course, all the neighbors were out. Low speed, almost stopped, a little bit of slip on the sand. On the ground.
 

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one other thing to keep in mind - if you are stopping somewhere and start to lose your footing and the bike starts going over, remember a human is able to generate about 1/3 rd of a HP at best

and the smallest Vstar bike is 40 HP. If you have to room to keep the bike moving steering hard into the direction the bike is falling towards and applying engine power will stand the bike back up - you dont have to sit there and watch the bike go down because you cant plant the your foot.

If you keep this in mind all the time, dont pull up behind obstacles and try to stop right behind them, stop a little short, give yourself some escape room, and plant your foot, you will have the option to "go around" like a jet that blows a landing.

one of the first stunts I learned on a dirt bike is to stop, put your right foot down, turn the grips hard to the right, let the clutch out enough to spin the rear tire while keeping your right foot planted

the bike spins around and around your planted foot - when you had enough you give it some more gas and the bike stands up

not saying you should do this on a street bike (you can) but it illustrates the point.
 

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Okay, to start with, both me and the daughter are ok. She didn't even get a single scratch and I banged up my knee but whatever...We're perfectly fine.

I've owned a bike for about a month or so. I have a steep driveway and I usually just ride it down the hill and go on about my business. Yesterday, something else happened. We had the yard guy here and there was a lot of grass clippings in the drive way. Apparently, I might as well have driven on ice. Back end started to come out, tried to do something about it and decided that since my daughter was on the back, I wasn't going to fight it. I got us into some soft grass and laid it down. We're good and bike is good. We both got back up and decided we needed to complete our task of my daughter's first motorcycle ride and we did.

Here are the questions...
1. Is this a sign that I suck and that motorcycles aren't for me? I mean, one month in, driving to work and stuff multiple days a week and this happens? In my stupid driveway!?
2. Where was the mistake I made?
3. I don't know what's normal for people having accidents like this, dropping a bike, etc. so it right now feels like I need to take this as a sign but, some part of me says this is normal too.

Anyway, thoughts?
First glad you and your daughter are ok and kudos especially your daughter for get back up and riding.


I know the feeling all too well from both happening directly to me and witnessing family and friends, it happens and the feeling of it happening is sometimes harder than anything else. I still look at the places I dropped the bikes over the years and still run different scenarios in my head and why did it happen and crap I hope it doesn't happen again. Then when I think or know why it happen I try to practice how to maneuver this situation if ever I am in that same predicament, maybe never and hopefully not but it was a learning and humbling experience.


I read all the other replies a lot of good advice and actually I have been riding for over 40 years and never would I have thought grass would be any kind of issue, I am from upstate New York and Connecticut and we always watched for sand, leaves, animals and any debris but grass clippings never, so from you I learn something new sorry but thanks.


I could understand maybe a lot of clippings and into a curve but still no concern. Now fast forward 20 something years later after leaving Connecticut and living in GA that's all I see and run into grass clippings in the road way not to mention leaves so know I have another item to add to SIPDE (look it up).


So question 1, no you don't suck, I know the feeling but apparently grass clippings on a driveway does.


Question 2, no mistake was made if you didn't learn from it, also to add you are going to have many more near drops and those too will make you think just as much as the "drop"


Question 3, your feelings are your own, you can beat yourself up, be upset because of the turn of events, and you can look back brush it off, no one was hurt and continue riding cautiously and getting as much wind therapy as you can and give the finger to any grass clippings you see in your path. I know I will in your and your daughter's honor.
Enjoy many more years of riding.
 

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I’m with everyone else in saying we’re glad you’re ok. You were smart in heading to soft grass. Lesson learned, don’t beat yourself up over it, practice in an empty lot and hone your skills, I go to an empty lot every spring and practice my basics


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It happens, I was backing my bike down my driveway and my boot got wedged under the left foot board. There was nothing I could do at that moment. The bike laid down on my ankle. I was able to get out from under it and stand it back up. Ankle was sore for a week. Thank God for crash bars. I got some good footage from my security cams to laugh and watch. Just get comfortable with the bike and your abilities before you toss anyone on the back. I went 2 months of constant riding before I let my wife on. I had had prior scooters just no motorcycles at that time. You have got this though. Don't get down. Learn from your mistakes. Tell your lawn guy to throw the grass away from the drive. That should be a no brainier.
 

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....You were smart in heading to soft grass. ...
I have to respectfully disagree.

I think the back end started to spin the tire and it came around on him, and he ended up on the lawn

you never want to ride on grass, lawn, fields... on a street bike - not even on a dirt bike - you will almost certainly spin the rear tire or lock up the front braked

remember this, even when you are turning around in your drive way, dont let the front wheel go 'a little bit' on the lawn - back it up and do a 3 point turn if you have to.

if you have to go across a lawn, 2mph.. .keep your feet down, only go straight, dont touch the front brakes - it is very much like riding on ice!

if you are riding and have to swerve to avoid a collision, if you have a choice stay on dry pavement - hitting a lawn will almost certainly cause you to go down, and the bike might tumble

you are better off going down on the pavement and sliding it out (let your riding gear do its job), than doing cartwheels in a field

and BTW, I lived in WP Beach for 2 years back in the '70s - I know you dont have real grass in florida - its some nasty crab grass mutant species.... :^)
 

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Glad everybody and everything are okay! Grass clippings may as well be marbles. If you live in an area where there is snow watch out for those early spring rides especially if they use salt or sand to treat the roads. That gets slick also. Loose gravel same thing. Strongly suggest the MSF course. Check with your state to see if they offer it. In Ohio I paid $50 bucks for it. If I went to a Harley dealership they do it for $250. Same class just more expensive. As others have said get real comfortable before adding passengers.
 

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I'm glad you and your daughter are okay.

My first bike is the 650, purchased last November. I passed the MSF last July 2019. I have about 2,500 miles under my belt. What happened to you, happens to the best of us and can happen to any us at any given time. I think about this every time I swing my leg over the bike when I'm about to leave the house. Falling down is a privilege and a good thing, if you fall off the horse get back on the saddle every time or you'll never ride on a horse again.

I also dropped my bike in a slow motion shortly after I bought it, but I learned a lot from that slow drop. My ego was bruised and hurt, I was okay on the outside, the bike was okay.

Not long ago, I almost dropped the bike in the parking lot at work. Now that feels like summer in Southern CA., and the rain is gone I ride to work at least 4 times a week. Last Thursday morning I pulled up in the parking lot, for some reason I thought I had already pushed the kick stand down. I started leaning the bike to my left, this is if you're sitting on the bike, when I looked down I noticed the kick stand was NOT down.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
First glad you and your daughter are ok and kudos especially your daughter for get back up and riding.


I know the feeling all too well from both happening directly to me and witnessing family and friends, it happens and the feeling of it happening is sometimes harder than anything else. I still look at the places I dropped the bikes over the years and still run different scenarios in my head and why did it happen and crap I hope it doesn't happen again. Then when I think or know why it happen I try to practice how to maneuver this situation if ever I am in that same predicament, maybe never and hopefully not but it was a learning and humbling experience.


I read all the other replies a lot of good advice and actually I have been riding for over 40 years and never would I have thought grass would be any kind of issue, I am from upstate New York and Connecticut and we always watched for sand, leaves, animals and any debris but grass clippings never, so from you I learn something new sorry but thanks.


I could understand maybe a lot of clippings and into a curve but still no concern. Now fast forward 20 something years later after leaving Connecticut and living in GA that's all I see and run into grass clippings in the road way not to mention leaves so know I have another item to add to SIPDE (look it up).


So question 1, no you don't suck, I know the feeling but apparently grass clippings on a driveway does.


Question 2, no mistake was made if you didn't learn from it, also to add you are going to have many more near drops and those too will make you think just as much as the "drop"


Question 3, your feelings are your own, you can beat yourself up, be upset because of the turn of events, and you can look back brush it off, no one was hurt and continue riding cautiously and getting as much wind therapy as you can and give the finger to any grass clippings you see in your path. I know I will in your and your daughter's honor.
Enjoy many more years of riding.
Love this! ?grass!
 
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