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since someone just brought this up, which part of the lane do you typically stay in while on the freeways and interstates and highways and byways and such?


I like to stay in far right hand side of my lane. For me if a distracted driver is coming towards me or a vehicle comes flying up behind me I feel I have a better chance of getting out of the way, but that’s just me.


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Depends where you live and condition of road actually.
Here, the roads crown in the center so rain runs off. The right side usually is the roughest.
I am always dodging dead animals, potholes, manhole covers, gravel up here so I am all over the road.
 

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What I learned from the Rider Skills class is that your lane position changes all the time. Say, for example, if there is a left curve then you should be on the far right side to extend angle of view and be able to see behind the curve as far as possible. If there is a hill then stay in the center and raise off the seat again to see as far as you can. If you are on multiple lane road riding on the right lane then you should stay on the left side of the lane so the others can see you and will not try to change a lane right where you are. If riding in the middle lane(s) then your position depends on traffic on adjacent lanes. Anyways, my lane positioning is all over the lane, I don't stay in one lane portion all the time. That's what I learned from both MSF and Motor Officer. They call it "defensive riding"
 

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What I learned from the Rider Skills class is that your lane position changes all the time. Say, for example, if there is a left curve then you should be on the far right side to extend angle of view and be able to see behind the curve as far as possible. If there is a hill then stay in the center and raise off the seat again to see as far as you can. If you are on multiple lane road riding on the right lane then you should stay on the left side of the lane so the others can see you and will not try to change a lane right where you are. If riding in the middle lane(s) then your position depends on traffic on adjacent lanes. Anyways, my lane positioning is all over the lane, I don't stay in one lane portion all the time. That's what I learned from both MSF and Motor Officer. They call it "defensive riding"
Exactly. Common sense.
The other day I was going down the road and there was a mini van with a tailpipe dragging on the ground.
It was a 2 lane road and could not pass. I had to position myself to be ready in case it fell off.
I finally pulled off the side of the road and let a few cars behind me pass and have me some distance.
People need to secure loads in pickups and make sure that pieces of their vehicles are secure.
 

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I dont try to stay in any part of the lane.

I ride with the flow of traffic, and move within my space to optimize my view, and my visibility to other drivers.

when I stop behind a car at an intersection, I stay 10 ft behind them, on the left side, and point my bike to the left of the car in front of me, in case I need to get out of that spot.

A couple people thought I wanted to pass them and tried to wave me thru - they must be from California :^)
 

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Since we don't have a law in maryland that you must be in the right lane, except when passing, I normally am in the left lane, and in the left side so I am away from people in the right lane, and can hit the shoulder.

If traffic is busy, and people are just being agressive, I will move randomly to the right, so people don't think the space is empty and attempt to move into me.
 

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Normally ride in the left lane, on the left side of the lane. Unless of course I am riding behind someone which then I ride on the right side.
 

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Left portion. I've found that riding center or right then cars tend to assume that i don't need the unused portion of the lane. Especially freeway. Back roads I'll ride like center left. Right side typically but not always has more loose gravel and debris.
 

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i don't like the curb side because an animal or person or whatever can surprise you too easily, loose gravel and car doors opening are other things on that right side, on the highway i position myself where i feel safest, sometimes i ride the middle if there's no oil trac there, you hardly ever hear anyone talk about the middle it's not always dirty there
 

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I'd parrot what pretty much everyone else has said. Depends on the road surface, what type of road i'm on, and traffic. On the 101, i usually stick to the HOV lane and the left side of that as it's closest to the shoulder should I need to get out of the way of someone merging into me. If i'm in the right lane, I tend to stay closer to the right shoulder. On non-highway roads, I usually wander all over depending on the road to avoid potholes, trash, etc. I will say that here at least the center of the lane isn't as oil-covered as it was in the Midwest so it's a little safer to ride dead center than a lot of places, although I try not to do that too often.
 

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On the freeway (most of my riding to work and back) I alternate between the number 1 and number 2 lane and try to stay close to the line that divides the 2.

If traffic comes to a sudden stop, which it does frequently in SoCal, I have more time to slow down since I can filter between cars.

When traffic is moving along at a good clip I tend to move back and forth between lanes(using my turn signal to indicate my movement) and keep a pace just slightly faster than traffic so I am never in a blind spot for more than a moment.

When traffic is slow or stopped or stop n go, I lane split, so I am mostly in the number 1 lane, but on occasion cross the line.
 

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This is not related to a line position, but I'd recommend to wave your bike when you're behind the car you're ready to pass/overtake to let the driver know you're there. Just make sure you're visible in rear view mirror(s) while waving. I also keep my thumb on the horn button when passing/overtaking cars.
 

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This is not related to a line position, but I'd recommend to wave your bike when you're behind the car you're ready to pass/overtake to let the driver know you're there. Just make sure you're visible in rear view mirror(s) while waving. I also keep my thumb on the horn button when passing/overtaking cars.
how do you "wave your bike"?
 

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how do you "wave your bike"?
Just slightly lean your bike from side to side few times to make a "wave". Enough to make your headlight move, nothing extreme. Moving objects get caught by eye sooner and draw more attention because it is a "warning". I've been using this technique this week and it actually works - I didn't get cut off as many times as I used to. I also do that at intersections to make myself more visible to the cars on other roadways and cars turning left.
 

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I understand the intention of that, but Im not sure how I feel about being all over the lane in traffic.

I have seen MC riders that drift all over the lane while riding. They look like they have no control over their bike. I try to keep the bike as straight, stable and.... well... predictable in the part of the lane that Im in when there are other vehicles around.

If Im approaching an intersection with traffic and I feel at-risk, I roll off the throttle and slow down - esp if someone is signaling to make a turn across my path. That gives them more time to see me, a better gauge on my speed, and its clear that I am going straight thru. It also gives me more time to make sure they are really stopped, and are going to stay stopped until I pass.

Also regarding approaching a car that is about to turn: dont ever blink or flash your headlights at them to get their attention. In many parts of the country that means "I see you want to turn, go ahead - I will give you enough time to cross my path" or in short "blinking them thru" means GO AHEAD!

Where there is no traffic around I do practice swerving around man hole covers and other points on the road, and stopping aggressively when there is no one behind me, just to practice those skills. But I dont want someone calling 911 to report a drunk rider on a motorcycle.

I understand there is no one "best way to ride". Also it helps to put your self into the mind of the other drivers - what are they seeing and thinking when you ride by? When someone has sat waiting to make a left turn across my path, esp when they have waited a bit longer than they needed to (if they could have made a clean turn, but they waited for me to pass) then I always wave as I ride by, to show my thanks.
 

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My default is position #1 (left side of lane). It's more habit than anything, but there is at least -some- method to the madness:

On surface streets I'm more concerned about things coming from the right - car doors opening, folks pulling into traffic without really looking, backing out of driveways, etc. Plus the typical "turning left across your lane without seeing you" is a concern, and I suspect being in the left of the lane is marginally more visible (although I 'assume the worst' and suspect nothing would make the folks who do that "see" me).

On highways I don't typically ride in the left-most lane unless passing, so I've found people try to 'push in' to my lane unexpected from the left more than the right (yeah, people 'merge' from the right too, but I find that more predictable / less often...)

I do ride in all three positions regularly as called for. E.g. if I -am- in the leftmost lane on the highway, I tend to stay center or right as that's where interference is likely to come from (and where there's typically less gravel/debris/etc). It's especially true in my preferred venue - twisty two-lane roads - where I definitely do the 'outside-apex-outside' method. One of my pet peeves about group riding (and why I do it rarely) is folks who want to 'stay in position' through curves (often ignoring the ride leader's 'single-file' signal, though in my book single-file through curves is default and shouldn't even have to be called) and act like I've 'cut them off' if I use the whole lane.

I agree with KCW's comment above about weaving all over. There is a difference between altering your lane position purposefully for a reason (e.g. on curves, due to traffic conditions, etc.) and just plain old meandering (which I do see frequently).
 

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Where there is no traffic around I do practice swerving around man hole covers and other points on the road, and stopping aggressively when there is no one behind me, just to practice those skills. But I dont want someone calling 911 to report a drunk rider on a motorcycle.
I'm glad I'm not the only one who 'practices' emergency maneuvers (on a clear empty road of course)! I most often do it as I drive through my neighborhood leaving/returning from home (little-trafficked but nice and wide streets).

Never occurred to me someone might call me in as impaired. Never thought of that. But now that you've mentioned it, I wonder what my neighbors must think of me... driving around the neighborhood weaving all over and slamming on the brakes...
 

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"waving" a bike doesn't mean going all over the lane. It is a very narrow "wave" within your lane position. It makes you more visible because your headlight is moving. It is not a "blinking" or "flashing". Anyways, I don't insist on doing this just recommending, but it helps me so I'm going to keep doing it. I learned it from Rider Skills class.

I normally practice my low speed control and emergency situations on the empty parking lot that happened to be around the corner from our house.
 

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"waving" a bike doesn't mean going all over the lane. It is a very narrow "wave" within your lane position. It makes you more visible because your headlight is moving. It is not a "blinking" or "flashing". Anyways, I don't insist on doing this just recommending, but it helps me so I'm going to keep doing it. I learned it from Rider Skills class.

I normally practice my low speed control and emergency situations on the empty parking lot that happened to be around the corner from our house.
I don't think wiggling the bars to make your light move and be more visible is the sort of 'weaving' KCW or I meant.
 
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