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Discussion Starter #1
So in conversation with my son we were talking about a racing video we had watched and a crash that happened when this guy high sided
in a High speed turn exit .

We kind of wondered how do these racers train to crash or lay a bike down other than the obvious.

It's not like you can just go test theory out.

I've been riding bikes for nearly 40 years and never had to lay one down. Not sure I would know what to do...

so how do you learn this skill ? Trial and error ?
BAD NEWS.... :surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
True but there are situations where you would want to lay the bike down and slide off (push off) from it.

This is not a natural reaction. You have to be thinking ahead to be able to execute this reaction in mere
milliseconds.

If a large truck pulls out in front of you from a side street you do not want to take your head off going under the trailer
or the truck frame. You would want to drop it on it's side and slide under.

Being brakes and tires on bikes are better than ever in most cases we do not have to resort to these moves.
Still how do they learn how to do it. Wreck a bunch of bikes ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Regardless of the nevers, it could be that you life could be spared . Yes road rash would be a bitch, but alive
to tell about it. Those racers are not driving in traffic, They are running full out and crashes happen. Sometimes
very ugly and sometimes not so much.

But information lives out there that explains this action of properly laying it down.

What got us was how the hell would you practice or train for this. Maybe crash footage where the instructor
says (Now see that guy going down his with leg is under the bike Don't do this )...

Tank slappers also get things out of whack in a big hurry and can put you down.
Eating asphalt does not taste good...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I already looked that tid bit over as well as mixed comments from other blogs and rider sites. About 75% against and 25% for it.

I also heard that a simulator exist for road racers that has a movie video screen in front and a hydraulic operating motorcycle that
simulates the angle in the turns as well as laying it down.

Remember the stores like Fields and JC penney back in the 70's
used to have that old car driving simulator that was like the dash of an old ford and a steering wheel, gas and brake pedals.
We always ran over the woman pushing the shopping cart or the kid
running across the street to get the playball. :smile::laugh:
 

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As best I can tell, "laying the bike down" is exactly the same as a low-side crash. If you don't want to get into a low-side crash, you don't want to "lay your bike down." The usual way it happens is locking the rear brake, which will make the rear slide out unless you are very lucky or very good. I personally think the root cause is the car-trained reaction of stomping the pedal to stop in an emergency. I think the CanAm Spyder took the right approach by eliminating the front brake control and using the pedal to apply all braking.
 

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i wouldn't lay her down unless i was heading for a cliff. anyway laying it down i very simple,just lock the rear wheel while turning the forks to the stops and you'll low side the motorcycle. it's usually best to just shave off as much speed as possible with the brakes to lessen the impact force. once you lock the wheel you won't be able to steer anymore here's an article that can help..Myth: Laying Down a Motorcycle to Avoid Injury | Clay Dugas and Associates
 

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I ended up laying down my first bike.

I was going down a road with new pavement on a hot summer day. Normal pressure on front and back brakes cause the rear tire to lock up and next thing I know, I am headed for the guardrail at about 30 mph.

The locked rear slid out and the bike's two tires were pointed toward the guardrail.

This situation kicks in the "time is slow" factor, so I remember going through the mental math of my options. I chose to lay it down and then used the pegs and seat to launch myself away from the bike, in effect slowing my speed relative to the road.

I had a little road rash, but most of the slide was absorbed via my boots, jeans, leather jacket and metal watch band.

I'll never forget the event (happened over 15 years ago and I can replay it clearly whenever I wish)

The point is on the "time is slow".

I would focus on motorcycle safety and not worry about the sliding part.


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Resto I think I understand where you are coming from. If I had to guess I would think most bike racers learned from experience not necessarily "practicing". I would imagine, like any other type of racing, if you do it long enough you will gain some experience with crashing. It just comes with the territory I suppose.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Let me refresh the idea behind this thread, I myself am not looking for ideas on how to lay MY bike down.

I just wanted to know how the racers train to do this at such high speeds. I just wanted info on how you would learn.

I guess most on here would agree to not do it. I think If I was forced to I would follow what spec95t said.
 

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Im not so sure racers learn anything in regard to laying down a bike.
I think they MAY be trained how to fall if they are falling, I have no idea, much like a football player but maybe not even that.

I can only assume they are taught like us, do not lay down a bike, by all means, use your brakes properly and stay with the bike.

Heading into an impact, your body can not come close to slowing down as much as staying on the bike and properly applying the brakes.
Your body has no brakes to slow it down heading into a wall, your bike can cut your speed in half and more of your body heading into a wall.

So, you look up, there is a wall or guard rail, your heading straight into it, properly braking will slow your body down 10 times faster when it hits the guard rail, then if you ditch the bike and have your body slide along the pavement into the wall with no brakes...

Some of the newer bikes with linked ABS are nothing short of amazing in this regard. Some of them are almost foolproof, hit the brakes, you hear a chirp and darn bike stops on a dime.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
what you just said makes a lot of sense. If you stay with the bike you can still modulate the brakes but when the rider
(disconnects) or pushes off then no braking is going on at all. other than metal rubber and skin....

This makes the most sense of why not to lay the bike down.

You win the best response award on this thread.... Thanks:wink:
 

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Thanks,

Like everything is life, there are always exception to every rule but the golden rule is dont lay down a bike, once you do, you lose all chances to slow your body down from certain impact.

Im sure it is a reaction, your traveling along at 55 MPH, see something ahead of you or something jumps out at you, and naturally your brain tells you to get off the bike, its going to crash but if you do jump off that bike your body is still moving at the same speed of the bike, you lose all chances of reducing that speed of your body of whatever it is about to hit into.

Applying the brakes properly can drastically reduce the speed of your body before impact. It might be scary as hell to stay with the bike because your going to get hurt but staying with the bike is going to drastically reduce damage to your body due to the reduced impact speed.
 
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