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Eluder GT is my ride. Anyone here used a lift for your Eluder, SV or SVTC? I just bought Harbor Freight's newer aluminum model #63397. I haven't decided on keeping it yet, especially after seeing some videos on the J&S lift (which is about $400.00 more). My experience in the past with HF weight ratings is that they are "generous."
Probably not a lot of help for your question, but I use a HF Model 2792 (older steel version), rated @ 1500 pounds to pick up my SVTC. I've never been happy about how the lowering process works, but it picks my bike up (and holds it there) without issue. So, if my 1500 lb rating is the same as the model 63397's 1500 lb rating, you should be ok picking up the 100 lb lighter Eluder. Emphasis on "if" and "should".
 

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I've never been happy about how the lowering process works,
I have heard if you try to lower slowly it comes down fast. I've also heard if you fully engage the lowering lever (counter-intuitive, but so is pulling the right side of the handle bar to turn left.) the slow speed lower mode is there.
 
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I have the older Harbor freight lift and a Larkin lift I use the Harbor freight and the other one sits in the shed. Not to say that the Harbor freight is that great, it works and the foot lowering hydraulic release is a little jerky. The aluminum one you show looks like it nicer, longer and wider, so I'm assuming more stable. It looks like it might be a twist the handle for releasing hydraulics, this is probably a little easier to control downward motion as you have more control with your hands as apposed to the foot control.

I watched the F&S video's and read some reviews, it seems very impressive. One thing I'd say is that the Harley may be perfectly balanced and the frame exposed enough to center the lift at that balancing point. The F&S lift looks like similar designed with box tubing to the steel Harbor Freight, but I assume they have tighter tolerances, heavier wall tubing and maybe use bushing instead of just holes in the square tubing. But back to my Eluder, I cannot find a perfectly centered balance point on the frame for lifting. I think I moved the jack as far back on the bike and was very close to balance point, but I had to block the rear wheel as it wanted to sit on the ground (I just lift to the jacks first locking detent) for oil change. So my point is the stability is partly the jack quality and width of jacking points, but it also depends on where you can lift the bike from and it's center of gravity. It would be nice to hear from someone that already owns a Venture or Eluder and uses the J&S jack. Myself being so cheap, and not one to use a motorcycle jack that often, I don't know if it's worth the extra $400 for the F&S to me. If you have multiple bikes that you use a lift on more frequently, definitely worth the money. That's kind of how I decide to spend a lot on name brand tools, versus something that I barely use once in a while, than I'll buy Harbor Freight stuff.
 

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I liked the looks of the aluminum one better when I bought mine. Unfortunately at that time they had stopped selling it and I had to get the steel version. According to the guy at HF people were returning them at an unusual rate and some were trying to lift cars with them and damaging? Not sure if I buy the story but that's another thread.....

I agree that the tolerances probably aren't as great on the HF jack as some of the higher priced units. But I'm cheap and the jack is only used a few times a year for maintenance and washing. What I've found that greatly improves the stability is a couple of simple 2x12s. On my jack I can lower it onto the boards and the safety stops are right up against the 2nd set of stops. I can grab the bike and it barely moves when I do this. Makes it much nicer when wrenching not having the bike bob around.

105056
 

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I have heard if you try to lower slowly it comes down fast. I've also heard if you fully engage the lowering lever (counter-intuitive, but so is pulling the right side of the handle bar to turn left.) the slow speed lower mode is there.
Yep heard this too. So I've tried it the last couple times I've used the jack and in those instances fully pressing the release pedal did in fact bring it down slowly. Takes some of the anxiety away when you see it drift down nice and slow.
 

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I have heard if you try to lower slowly it comes down fast. I've also heard if you fully engage the lowering lever (counter-intuitive, but so is pulling the right side of the handle bar to turn left.) the slow speed lower mode is there.
That's how it works and that's what I don't like about it. That initial freefall, especially with 1000 pounds sitting on it, bounces the load significantly. It seems maybe that freefall is longer than it used to be, making the bike be nearly on the ground before "catching" the slow release point. I'd rather have control of the descent rate similar to my other hyrdaulic jacks that lower based on how much I open (or don't open) the release valve.
 

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Eluder GT is my ride. Anyone here used a lift for your Eluder, SV or SVTC? I just bought Harbor Freight's newer aluminum model #63397. I haven't decided on keeping it yet, especially after seeing some videos on the J&S lift (which is about $400.00 more). My experience in the past with HF weight ratings is that they are "generous."
I have that lift and like it better than the peddle release as I can control the lowering speed by the amount a twist the handle. But then to be honest I don’t use it that often as I have a Black Widow lift that I use for most of my work now.
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
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HF motorcycle jack test on car.

Trying to let jack down slow by barely pushing on foot pedal, very jerky.


Pushed foot release all the way down, goes down, nice and slow.


Yes, poor video, hard to hold phone and do jack, I'm not coordinated. 🤣
 

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I like the HF jack after learning the full down is slow release.
As for weight I use it on a stratoliner and never have a problem, I do strap it when I get the height I want and I make sure the strap is on the frame not on the seat.

here is the strat

105057


here is the 650

105058
 

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Eluder GT is my ride. Anyone here used a lift for your Eluder, SV or SVTC? I just bought Harbor Freight's newer aluminum model #63397. I haven't decided on keeping it yet, especially after seeing some videos on the J&S lift (which is about $400.00 more). My experience in the past with HF weight ratings is that they are "generous."
I have this lift, and it works like a charm, for both my SVTC and my Kawasaki ZR-7S You turn the handle to the left, and it will slowly open the hydraulic release valve. You can do this to make the bike come down so slowly, that you could grab the wife, the girlfriend, (or both...lol), afterwards, smoke a couple of joints...and then whisper to her/them, was it good for you, too? Check your watch...go pour a beer, and the tires should just about then be touching down and settling down onto the side stand, so you are good to go! The aluminum is worth much more in materials (value) and build, than what price they are asking for...so a very good bike investment.

Joe
 

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That is nice but where are the attachment points on a big cruiser. that is set up for sport bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks to all for your input! I tried out the aluminum HF lift on a lighter bike and it worked well, so I tried it under my '13 Roadliner S but ran into some trouble with the design of that frame and drain bolt boss (will need to rig some spacer blocks for that application). I made a "sissy" attempt at lifting the Eluder GT but, as @rs1300 noted, the balance point seemed quite far back so I stopped. More experimenting needed...

On a side note, I took the Roadliner S for a ride today. I still love this bike: it seems as strong, steady and pretty as when it was new. I think its brute acceleration would trounce the Eluder GT. It does feel the wind more than the Eluder GT (and it was definitely windy today in southern Ohio), but the sense of freedom on an "essential" cruiser was definitely in play.

Thanks again, everyone, and safe biking to all!
 

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I would advise against buying the Harbor Freight Tools aluminum motorcycle lift ! I made the mistake of buying one when it was on sale, even though I already had the steel version (lower clearance for the aluminum one). I eventually decided to use the aluminum lift to raise my Road Star to allow better access for cleaning. Shortly after raising the bike, I discovered an alarming fact about the aluminum lift. IT IS UNSTABLE!!!! Just rotating the front wheel caused the bike to sway alarmingly. I gave it to my brother to use when his lift broke, and while changing the oil on his VXT1300, the lift flipped the bike over, causing the pan of used oil to go flying. Therefore, I DO NOT suggest using the aluminum motorcycle lift from HFT.
I took some angle iron and cut two pieces @ 4" longer than the arms of the steel HFT lift, drilled holes in the appropriate spots to bolt them to said arms (try for fit before drilling- you will need to ensure they clear the lifting arms {and cut the ends at an angle to also clear said arms}). Attachment of these extensions make it easier to get under the bike frame for lifting for maintenance. Unfortunately, you will have to be more careful as to the extended lifts arms to clear the kickstand, if extended.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would advise against buying the Harbor Freight Tools aluminum motorcycle lift ! I made the mistake of buying one when it was on sale, even though I already had the steel version (lower clearance for the aluminum one). I eventually decided to use the aluminum lift to raise my Road Star to allow better access for cleaning. Shortly after raising the bike, I discovered an alarming fact about the aluminum lift. IT IS UNSTABLE!!!! Just rotating the front wheel caused the bike to sway alarmingly. I gave it to my brother to use when his lift broke, and while changing the oil on his VXT1300, the lift flipped the bike over, causing the pan of used oil to go flying. Therefore, I DO NOT suggest using the aluminum motorcycle lift from HFT.
I took some angle iron and cut two pieces @ 4" longer than the arms of the steel HFT lift, drilled holes in the appropriate spots to bolt them to said arms (try for fit before drilling- you will need to ensure they clear the lifting arms {and cut the ends at an angle to also clear said arms}). Attachment of these extensions make it easier to get under the bike frame for lifting for maintenance. Unfortunately, you will have to be more careful as to the extended lifts arms to clear the kickstand, if extended.
Thank you, @subbiker for your sound advice. I truly appreciate it. My first impression of the HF aluminum lift was that it was flexing too much even with only one wheel of the bike off the ground, and its lateral stability could be an issue. Also, that handle-operated release valve is delicate and a false move could drop a bike down rapidly. Before I take it back, I think I will try lifting a 1000 lb. SxS with it (since four-wheeled toys don't flop on their side so easily), or rig up some other test.

For an interesting reaction, watch this gentleman comparing his older (OTC, I think) lift to the new HF aluminum lift. The "fun" is from the 29 - 31 minute range in the video:
 

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I noticed that he lifted his Harley from the left....I've always lifted my bikes from the right. As a note of interest, I went to Sears as they were going out of business, and picked up one of their Big Red motorcycle lifts. Its basically a beefed up version of the steel HFT jack. It's no pressure/at rest position is a little higher than the aforementioned lift, and comes with two heavier-duty ratchet straps. since both of my current bikes have been lowered to allow me to get both feet on the ground at stops (29" inseam), I generally have to roll the bike up onto a 2 by 4 or 2 by six to enable insertion of the lift under the bike. I plan to use a paint pen to make index marks on the individual bike frames to aid in finding the balance point. On the Road Star, finding that point isn't so difficult. However, on the 1300, like the 950, the engine hangs below the frame in the front, making a lift from the side a bit more difficult to find ( I wonder if the share the same engine block?)
 

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Thank you, @subbiker for your sound advice. I truly appreciate it. My first impression of the HF aluminum lift was that it was flexing too much even with only one wheel of the bike off the ground, and its lateral stability could be an issue. Also, that handle-operated release valve is delicate and a false move could drop a bike down rapidly. Before I take it back, I think I will try lifting a 1000 lb. SxS with it (since four-wheeled toys don't flop on their side so easily), or rig up some other test.

For an interesting reaction, watch this gentleman comparing his older (OTC, I think) lift to the new HF aluminum lift. The "fun" is from the 29 - 31 minute range in the video:
My experience with it has been great. I find no flex, with both my 2018 SVTC and my 2004 Kawasaki ZR-7S. I like the fact that I can control the lowering speed, and you only need to start turning the pump handle slowly to get the release valve flow rate you want. I have never had a uncontrolled decent to the floor, but again, I only have to turn the handle release-left, gently to bring my SVTC down for a gentle landing onto its side stand. One does need to create their own lift pad (wood) to bring the lift point back towards the rear wheel somewhat, and provide greater clearance for oil drain access. I found that with my other cheap lift that this replaced, so not so much how the aluminum is designed. For the price, the cast aluminum side tongues are quite fabulous and well cast. For myself, I am quite happy with it...as well as the weight to move it around my garage floor, or out upon my driveway. Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
My experience with it has been great. I find no flex, with both my 2018 SVTC and my 2004 Kawasaki ZR-7S. I like the fact that I can control the lowering speed, and you only need to start turning the pump handle slowly to get the release valve flow rate you want. I have never had a uncontrolled decent to the floor, but again, I only have to turn the handle release-left, gently to bring my SVTC down for a gentle landing onto its side stand. One does need to create their own lift pad (wood) to bring the lift point back towards the rear wheel somewhat, and provide greater clearance for oil drain access. I found that with my other cheap lift that this replaced, so not so much how the aluminum is designed. For the price, the cast aluminum side tongues are quite fabulous and well cast. For myself, I am quite happy with it...as well as the weight to move it around my garage floor, or out upon my driveway. Cheers!
Thanks, @YamahaParExcellence for the input. That the HF aluminum unit lifts your SVTC without issues is encouraging. I did use it to lift up my SxS 4-wheeler (est. 1100 lbs.) yesterday and it did pretty well. I wiggled the SxS while elevated and there was definitely some flex in the lift. I was prepared for a cautious valve release for descent, based upon past experience. The Eluder GT is some 200 lbs. lighter so I will probably try lifting that before I give up on the HF aluminum lift but I want to have a helper on hand before I try.
 
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