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Thanks, @YamahaParExcellence for the input. That the HF aluminum unit lifts your SVTC without issues is encouraging. I did use it to lift up my SxS 4-wheeler (est. 1100 lbs.) yesterday and it did pretty well. I wiggled the SxS while elevated and there was definitely some flex in the lift. I was prepared for a cautious valve release for descent, based upon past experience. The Eluder GT is some 200 lbs. lighter so I will probably try lifting that before I give up on the HF aluminum lift but I want to have a helper on hand before I try.
Hi Wirebrush, and please let me define what I mean about 'flex'...yes, if you wiggle the bike, being that the support arms are flat steel, and are not reinforced from side to side, (no lift is...truly), then yes, the bike will move slightly. The flex you need to truly worry about, is the vertical plane, the lift plane. For if there is pogo-pogo 'flex' then the hydraulic lift and suspension parts can not support the weight of the load. In the lift plane, the aluminum frame piston, and flat re-bar strut supports have no problem, and when I lift, there is no bleed off for my lift duration.

All my prior lifts could be moved laterally, as there is no lift I know of out there, that has for instance side bar supports that are round, and therefore, would have some kind of anti-lateral resistance to movement on the horizontal plane. Also, for oil changes, that don't much move the bike on the lateral or vertical plane...the lift by itself (any lift by itself) is good without further support, BUT...if you are going to do physical repairs, re and re tires, rims, blah, blah...I always put two supports (axle supports with a flat wood top) under and just touching my front and back tire, so when I take off, or put on the rims, or parts...or torqueing fitments, the bike will NOT pogo front to back, back to front, and be very stable...with the lift only truly responsible for the lifting of the bike off of the ground.

If you are going to think about following my advise to add support to the front and the back of the bike...with T-supports or whatever else you make... I most HIGHLY suggest, that you attach a printed WARNING Card that you can clip onto the top of the lift handle (pump handle) to warn you that you have tire supports under your tires. Why? Because we as human beings, have, can, and will, 'while seeing' the supports there, under the tires, can when we set out mind to finishing the job...be 'mentally blind' to them. Of course, if you start dropping the bike with the tire supports in place, the bike will be suspended in the air, the lift going down and the bike will tumble towards you or away. Make your self-warning to remove BOTH tire supports BEFORE you descend, and this will never happen to you! Also, I suggest that you spray paint your supports (most likely home-made from two x fours) in WARNING PINK OR YELLOW paint, just as another safety layer of being 'in your face' visible and to the at-point conscious mind.

Personally, I have not, and would never not only use the few square inches of support from any motorcycle or ATV lift, that has a balance point in the MIDDLE of the lateral weight...to totally support the bike, when being touched and handled. You will always have FULRCUM effect in the lateral plane...and THAT is where bikes can and will tip over, or pitch forward or backward off of the lift support pads(bars). My 84 cents...lol! Be safe...and happy 'landings'; with your motorcycle!
 

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Hi Wirebrush, and please let me define what I mean about 'flex'...yes, if you wiggle the bike, being that the support arms are flat steel, and are not reinforced from side to side, (no lift is...truly), then yes, the bike will move slightly. The flex you need to truly worry about, is the vertical plane, the lift plane. For if there is pogo-pogo 'flex' then the hydraulic lift and suspension parts can not support the weight of the load. In the lift plane, the aluminum frame piston, and flat re-bar strut supports have no problem, and when I lift, there is no bleed off for my lift duration.

All my prior lifts could be moved laterally, as there is no lift I know of out there, that has for instance side bar supports that are round, and therefore, would have some kind of anti-lateral resistance to movement on the horizontal plane. Also, for oil changes, that don't much move the bike on the lateral or vertical plane...the lift by itself (any lift by itself) is good without further support, BUT...if you are going to do physical repairs, re and re tires, rims, blah, blah...I always put two supports (axle supports with a flat wood top) under and just touching my front and back tire, so when I take off, or put on the rims, or parts...or torqueing fitments, the bike will NOT pogo front to back, back to front, and be very stable...with the lift only truly responsible for the lifting of the bike off of the ground.

If you are going to think about following my advise to add support to the front and the back of the bike...with T-supports or whatever else you make... I most HIGHLY suggest, that you attach a printed WARNING Card that you can clip onto the top of the lift handle (pump handle) to warn you that you have tire supports under your tires. Why? Because we as human beings, have, can, and will, 'while seeing' the supports there, under the tires, can when we set out mind to finishing the job...be 'mentally blind' to them. Of course, if you start dropping the bike with the tire supports in place, the bike will be suspended in the air, the lift going down and the bike will tumble towards you or away. Make your self-warning to remove BOTH tire supports BEFORE you descend, and this will never happen to you! Also, I suggest that you spray paint your supports (most likely home-made from two x fours) in WARNING PINK OR YELLOW paint, just as another safety layer of being 'in your face' visible and to the at-point conscious mind.

Personally, I have not, and would never not only use the few square inches of support from any motorcycle or ATV lift, that has a balance point in the MIDDLE of the lateral weight...to totally support the bike, when being touched and handled. You will always have FULRCUM effect in the lateral plane...and THAT is where bikes can and will tip over, or pitch forward or backward off of the lift support pads(bars). My 84 cents...lol! Be safe...and happy 'landings'; with your motorcycle!
Good advice! I am picturing the happy bike owner who is feeling pretty good about having just finished servicing his safely supported bike, then suddenly plunged into shock and self-loathing (and worse, maybe with a 900 lb. bike on top of himself). Thanks, @YamahaParExcellence
 

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I have to agree with YamahaParExcellence that most lifts will flex to some degree. His synopsis of doing different tasks and when to add blocking or not is spot on. If I was buying a new jack, I think I'd try the HF Aluminum one,

Concerning the twist handle for controlling lowering, I have two Craftsman car hydraulic jacks with the same type of pump and release handle. When releasing I find that it is easier to hold the handle with both hands when trying to open. You want to break the initial thread torque from the valve without actually pulling the plug out of the seat to quickly. When you have both hands on handle, your second one is there to kind of hold back from breaking valve torque too quickly causing a surge. I had this happen when I first bought the floor jacks, but have learned this technique to slowly lower the jacks without an abrupt start. Once you break the thread torque, you can easily control slow decent with one hand.

I thought since this is a floor jack thread, I would attach the F&S floor jack video that I believe Wirebrush mentioned in the first post just as a reference. I'm not advocating buying this as it is expensive, but I thought the video was worth seeing for comparison reasons.
Looking at this video, it looks like the jack may have a wider stance than some jacks. When you see the guy hanging on the jack (which I wouldn't advise anybody to try), I'm actually surprised of the minimum movement. I think they use heavier wall tubing and tighter tolerances on all clearances as the overall design doesn't look a lot different than the steel HF floor jack. Obviously the bike they chose for the video is also perfectly balanced. If you are pulling one of the wheels off, I doubt it would still be that stable.
 

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Good advice! I am picturing the happy bike owner who is feeling pretty good about having just finished servicing his safely supported bike, then suddenly plunged into shock and self-loathing (and worse, maybe with a 900 lb. bike on top of himself). Thanks, @YamahaParExcellence
Exactly! Humans...and especially MALE humans...sometimes...oh heck. LOTS OF TIMES...(ask any wife or girlfriend, ...lol) can mentally 'soft focus'....and the "oh...you have GOT to be kidding?!?" can come into play.... Giving yourself a warning tag right on the very actuator that lifts or drops...and it just won't happen...(smile). You read...mutter; "oh yeah...geez!!!", or something a little more colorful...step to the front, pull away support, step to the back, pull away support---->...and then stand again in front of the actuator.... Yep...been there, done that...done that, been there...lol! No falling bikes to date...with many years of lifting and descending....
 

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When I first noticed the sloppiness of my aluminum HF lift, I noticed what I felt was too much space between the frame, lift arms and snap rings. In a attempt to tighten things up, I found and inserted a few flat washers to fill the gaps a bit better. This worked to some extent, but was still unsatisfactory. Unless HF has tightened up its tolerances, I would be loathe to recommend this m/c lift. On another note, before settling on the clearance sale Sears Big Red, I looked at the offering at Northern Tool Co. Their offering is more robust than the HF, but also a bit more expensive. Finding the balance point on your bike is very important, not only for your safety, but for the safety/ damage prevention of your bike.
A suggestion about how to deal with the upset of your bike when you remove a wheel is, once you have the bike raised to the level where you can remove the wheel (the rear is always higher than the front), measure the height to the bike frame to the ground and see if your jack has a stop for the lift lock at that height . If it does, fine, but if not, raise the bike until the next mechanical lift lock engages (hopefully, your lift will have the mechanical locks. Once you find your height measurement, find a board , at least 2" thick, and place it upright under the frame on the opposite side of the lift from the wheel you are removing (2"x6'', 2"x 8" for example) OR, a jack stand with a length of board wide enough to span your bike's frame. Do this BEFORE you remove the wheel! DO NOT rely on the hydraulic pressure of your lift to hold the bike elevated-all hydraulic cylinders bleed off pressure! You DO NOT want to come back to find your beautiful bike dumped on the ground!.
 
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I have to agree with YamahaParExcellence that most lifts will flex to some degree. His synopsis of doing different tasks and when to add blocking or not is spot on. If I was buying a new jack, I think I'd try the HF Aluminum one,

Concerning the twist handle for controlling lowering, I have two Craftsman car hydraulic jacks with the same type of pump and release handle. When releasing I find that it is easier to hold the handle with both hands when trying to open. You want to break the initial thread torque from the valve without actually pulling the plug out of the seat to quickly. When you have both hands on handle, your second one is there to kind of hold back from breaking valve torque too quickly causing a surge. I had this happen when I first bought the floor jacks, but have learned this technique to slowly lower the jacks without an abrupt start. Once you break the thread torque, you can easily control slow decent with one hand.

I thought since this is a floor jack thread, I would attach the F&S floor jack video that I believe Wirebrush mentioned in the first post just as a reference. I'm not advocating buying this as it is expensive, but I thought the video was worth seeing for comparison reasons.
Looking at this video, it looks like the jack may have a wider stance than some jacks. When you see the guy hanging on the jack (which I wouldn't advise anybody to try), I'm actually surprised of the minimum movement. I think they use heavier wall tubing and tighter tolerances on all clearances as the overall design doesn't look a lot different than the steel HF floor jack. Obviously the bike they chose for the video is also perfectly balanced. If you are pulling one of the wheels off, I doubt it would still be that stable.
Rs1300, you wrote;

Concerning the twist handle for controlling lowering, I have two Craftsman car hydraulic jacks with the same type of pump and release handle. When releasing I find that it is easier to hold the handle with both hands when trying to open. You want to break the initial thread torque from the valve without actually pulling the plug out of the seat to quickly. When you have both hands on handle, your second one is there to kind of hold back from breaking valve torque too quickly causing a surge. I had this happen when I first bought the floor jacks, but have learned this technique to slowly lower the jacks without an abrupt start. Once you break the thread torque, you can easily control slow decent with one hand.
-----------------------------------------------

Excellent point and observation. That is exactly what I do...and as you, all my shop jacks for the car/truck/ranch equipment is of the pump handle, with left thread turning release. My M.O. is also and always two hands, that as you, slowly turn to the left until I feel movement in the lift cylinder...and then it goes down as SLOW or (again, I like to have the control rate) as fast as I want. For my cars or tractor, I just ler 'er rip...as it going down on one or two of the same side tires. Yeah,..I really like the much lighter weight of the aluminum jack, for moving around...and...that you can move it with the handle, same as my car/tractor jack. A keeper for my shop...
 

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When I first noticed the sloppiness of my aluminum HF lift, I noticed what I felt was too much space between the frame, lift arms and snap rings. In a attempt to tighten things up, I found and inserted a few flat washers to fill the gaps a bit better. This worked to some extent, but was still unsatisfactory. Unless HF has tightened up its tolerances, I would be loathe to recommend this m/c lift. On another note, before settling on the clearance sale Sears Big Red, I looked at the offering at Northern Tool Co. Their offering is more robust than the HF, but also a bit more expensive. Finding the balance point on your bike is very important, not only for your safety, but for the safety/ damage prevention of your bike.
A suggestion about how to deal with the upset of your bike when you remove a wheel is, once you have the bike raised to the level where you can remove the wheel (the rear is always higher than the front), measure the height to the bike frame to the ground and see if your jack has a stop for the lift lock at that height . If it does, fine, but if not, raise the bike until the next mechanical lift lock engages (hopefully, your lift will have the mechanical locks. Once you find your height measurement, find a board , at least 2" thick, and place it upright under the frame on the opposite side of the lift from the wheel you are removing (2"x6'', 2"x 8" for example) OR, a jack stand with a length of board wide enough to span your bike's frame. Do this BEFORE you remove the wheel! DO NOT rely on the hydraulic pressure of your lift to hold the bike elevated-all hydraulic cylinders bleed off pressure! You DO NOT want to come back to find your beautiful bike dumped on the ground!.
Good advice and recommendations. I bought my HF aluminum U frame two years ago, and (at least on mine...) have not had a jiggle or sloppiness that was enough to stop me, from using, or in having taken it back with the first attempted use. Thinking about my HF in discussing it on this thread, I might need to see what is the re and re hydraulic fluid change out recommendation (or if there even is one) as one of my car/truck lifts asks you to re and re the oil after three years. Oxidization of the oil, can affect its viscosity as well as no longer adequately 'nourishing' the rubber and/or Verathane piston seal. Yeah..I should grab the manual and check it out...and whatever! :)
 

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I recommend placing them (the wife, the girlfriend) on either side of the bike. For safety. You should ideally be two towns over at the time. For safety.
It's like the old joke , I have a girlfriend that can cook and clean , and a girlfriend who is great in bed, I hope the two never meet.
 
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