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Welcome to the forum. The 650 is a very dependable bike - perfect to start out on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, I put the lights on and some other stuff. It had sat outside with no protection for I don't know how long, needs some engine work, mostly carb stuff, front fork springs, tires, clutch, and lots of cleaning. Here's what it looked like when I bought it.


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Super Moderator "Loose Nut"
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Welcome from Houston, Texas. Ride often and safe.
 

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Welcome to the forum from East Tennessee, very nice ride and I like the lights as well. Glad you joined us!


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Discussion Starter #11
Welcome to the forum. The 650 is a very dependable bike - perfect to start out on.
It's been a nice starter bike, I have dropped it twice at very low speed, (thinking you're in first but are actually I'm second makes for a rough turn) but it's held up nice sofar. Overall I love it, I've found that the 650 is a bit small for having a passenger though.

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Overall I love it, I've found that the 650 is a bit small for having a passenger though.
Yeah, that's why I got an 1100. I looked at a 650 but it just didn't feel like enough for carrying a passenger. Now my wife loves riding so much she's talking about getting her license and her own bike. When she does we'll be shopping for a 650 for her.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, that's why I got an 1100. I looked at a 650 but it just didn't feel like enough for carrying a passenger. Now my wife loves riding so much she's talking about getting her license and her own bike. When she does we'll be shopping for a 650 for her.
I'd like a bigger bike but I got this one for $650 and couldn't say no to that. My total investment has only been about $2k including my helmet.

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Helluva deal! Ride it, enjoy it. You'll get lots of trouble free miles.
 

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I got this one for $650 ....
when did they start selling bikes by the milliliter? $1 per CC is a good price!

Your two low speed bike drops are a good example of a learning opportunity for forum users.

The one critical thing about riding a MC compared to driving a car is turning and cornering.

For one thing you steer a MC backwards, countersteering: pushing the handlebar the opposite way that you would turn a steering wheel. To turn right you push the front wheel to the left, and the bike leans and turns to the right.

The other thing, going around a curve the bike is in perfect balance between the bend radius of the road, your speed, and the angle the bike is leaning. For this reason you must assess every turn and corner, and set up your speed and pick your line before you start turning. Once you are in the turn, if you are going too fast you are going wide and its too late to slow down safely. If your speed slows suddenly in the turn, either from you braking, rolling off the throttle, or if the engine drops out on you, the bike is going to spiral in tighter in the turn. If you dont correct the bike will hit the curb (right turn) of cross the center line (left turn), or just fall over.

Ive had this happen to me first thing in the morning. I pushed the choke in too soon, took off from a stop sign into a right turn, the engine bogged down and the bike was heading right for the shoulder. I almost dropped it - it happens so fast you dont expect it.

So how do you not drop your bike if the engine balks in the middle of a turn or corner? You straighten the bike up by countersteering the other way.

If you are turning right and you lose power, push the left handlegrip. That will stand the bike up straight so you can stop, or if you push a little bit more it will lean the bike the other way at your new slower speed (so you are no longer heading for the curb or the center line). If the engine has quit pull the clutch in so the bike will coast instead of slowing down further.

You need to practice this, everyone does. I see people "practicing" in parking lots all the time, but all they are doing is going in circles or figure 8's around and around, which doesnt really teach you anything.

In a parking lot ride in a big circle at a steady 15 to 20 mph, then roll off the throttle and see how the bike spirals into a smaller turn. Dont correct it so you see what happens.

Then try it again and countersteer to straighten the bike back up.

Ride in a circle at a steady speed, and get on the throttle a bit and see how the bike goes wide into a bigger circle. This can happen too if your throttle gets stuck open.

Practice both. Be ready to correct in a turn or corner.

Then ride in a circle and practice countersteering to stand the bike up straight, and then stop. If you try to brake while you are still turning, guess where your bike is going?

This also highlights the importance of having your bike in excellent running condition, not letting your main tank run dry (switch over to reserve tank when YOU want, not when the motor quits) and know what gear you are in before you enter a turn, and stay in that gear till you exit the corner or turn.

This really is one of the biggest risks on a motorcycle. On every turn or curve you need to setup your line and speed, and if possible stay on it all the way through the turn. Its 100 times easier than getting halfway through a turn, and then needing to take drastic measures to not wreck your bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
That's good advice, I'll try cornering in a parking lot when I get a chance. I've done some practice in a lot and took the pamvsc, also there's some roads near me good for practicing corners but experimenting with the throttle during a turn never occurred to me, it sounds like a smart thing to practice and be comfortable with.

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good deal on the road.

A lot of people try to get every curve and corner perfect, and spend all their time doing that, like you would practicing on a race track.

Thats good but we also need to practice what we need to do if we are into a curve and suddenly there is sand or dirt or cow poop, or a pot hole

or if a car coming the other way starts coming over the centerline.

Also need to practice swerving around objects when going straight (man hole covers are good for practice) and stopping aggressively.

Do this every day when you ride. Not all the time, but on some curves pull it in tighter, or go wider, dodge a few man hole covers, and when no one is behind you at a stop sign stop a little short and hard.

It needs to be muscle memory when you really need it.

besides that, its fun.

Just make sure there are no cops watching you when you practice swerving...
 
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