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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm getting my pops old bike up and running (trying to anyway), he lost the one key we had for it years ago, and never did anything with it because he wanted/wants to take it to someone to fix it for him, but it's a 1100 v star and the forks were locked. We got it to the shed and it's still there. I have gotten the key switch off and a blank ready so that's nearly delt with.
What I'm running into is questions of fuel. I took the tank off and it feels about half full. I took the petcock apart and the fuel was so old it looks like mud. I Order a new petcock, and I'm going to try to get new fuel lines and filter at work, but I don't want to replace the pump if I can help it, so question time.
Is it possible to clean any of the sludge out of the pump without ruining it and preferably with out digging it out of the bike? I'm considering opening the lines on either side and pumping a mixture of clean fuel and seafoam deep clean, I also may spray/pump brake cleaner first to help it out.
Any help is appreciated and I thank you for your time.
 

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its easy to pull the fuel line off the tank petcock and the line that goes to the carbs, put an external fuel bottle on the pump and run fuel and carb cleaner thru it.

I would ditch the fuel filter before you do this too, and get a new one.

If the tank is not full of rust and you run the pump till the fuel comes out clear, you hit the worst parts.

BTW, the fuel pump runs when you turn the key on with the kill switch = Live. I think it only runs for a few seconds, or maybe it runs till it builds back pressure - either way you might have to cycle the key a few times to run it repeatedly.

The real question is what was done to the carbs when the bike was last used? If the petcock was turned off and the engine run till the float bowls ran dry, you wont have any of that goop from the tank in the carbs... but things could be dried out in there, possibly corroded and green, and the floats might stick till you flush some carb cleaner thru them.

If the gas was left in the float bowls it might have all evaporated out and left goo in your jets.

If it were me, either way, clean fuel tank, lines, filter, fuel pump... then with carb cleaner / seafoam in fresh gas (follow the directions, dont put half a can in 2 gallons of gas)... turn the key on, let the pump fill the carbs and see if it starts.

IF the bike will start up and run at all, you have a 50:50 chance that carb cleaner will flush out the jets and passage. It might take a good 200 miles of riding hard to get it running well, but if its running at all then fuel and cleaner is flushing thru the jets, and they might do the job,

If it simple wont start, or it only starts on one cylinder (make sure both exhaust pipes are getting hot...) or if the floats stick and fuel comes out the over flow tube and it wont stop after a few minutes... then you will have to take the carbs apart and have at it with the infamous craigslist wording "Needs TLC"
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm planning on/in the process of removing the carbs to clean, because Dad never turned off the fuel, and replacing the filter. I want to avoid the running rough stage. Could I just jump the pump straight from the battery I'm buying today?
Also the newest inspection report I found is from 2007 and that is about right for how long it has been sitting. Other than the fuel systems, the oil, and tires is there anything else I need to be concerned about not working after sitting for so long?
 

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nothing to worry about... the shocks on the front you are already dealing with. the rear monoshock might be ok

You will want to lube the throttle and clutch cables, and make sure they are not sticking, adjust the clutch freeplay while you are at it.

You dont have to flush the brake fluid right away, but do make sure the front brake engages and releases without hanging up, and the rear brake (forget if yours is a pull bar or hydraulic disk).

the brake fluid absorbs water from the air over time, so you will want to replace it eventually. If you are not sure how to do this get the service manual (should be able to find it online in PDF format for free) - just make sure you dont pump the brakes when the reservoir is empty, if you get air in the master cylinders it goes from a 10 minute job to hell.
 

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Welcome from East Tennessee. You will get the best advice from the best members here.
Be sure to share some pics with us as you continue to get er running again!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I haven't messed with the shocks or forks ( I'm hoping to not need to rebuild them until I can afford to replace them they are horribly corroded) the clutch and front brake seem to be fine (master sight glass is hard to read). The throttle is stuck and rear brake needs help.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Interesting bit of a update just took the bowl off the right side carb to find this (if the images fails to work the bowl look clean and new almost) the Jets look nearly as clean, I am about to check the other carb but if it's just as clean then I just need to free up the butterflies and put it back together.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ya so clean it concerns me, it's like that on both carbs and all the Jets. If the one seal is dried out should I replace them all or just the ones I have unseated?
 

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in general if you leave an o ring sealed it normally wont start to leak on its own.

if you take the part or cover with an o ring off, its best to replace it, unless its new, or its really easy and quick to get to if it leaks.

O rings are not like gaskets, they remain pliable and you can take something apart and put it together over and over as long as the o rings are new

when they get old they get stiff, and wont expand back out to seal between the surfaces

the o rings on the valve adjustment tappet covers are infamous for this - it takes 3 hours to tear the carbs off to get those tappet covers removed to check and adjust the gaps. If you re-use the old ones and they ooze, it takes three hours to tear the carbs off to get those tappet covers removed to replace them with $4 new ones.

Ive never heard of one starting to leak on its own. They frequently leak after a valve adjustment if not replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So I shouldn't have to replace them if I just mess with the lower end, right?
What would be the simplest way to free up the butterflies, just some WD-40 or something like that? I worry about messing things up, this being my second time messing with a carb going back on a hopefully working motor.
 

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if you have the carbs off the bike you can soak them in carb cleaner, if not you can still spray it out good with the same stuff, just dont let it drip all over the rest of the bike.

Im not sure if WD40 would dissolve any gas residue.

One thing you should never use anywhere: Acetone will dissolve plastic, rubber, paint.. everything... including you.
 

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I took the petcock apart and the fuel was so old it looks like mud.
What's the inside of the tank look like like? You may be lucky with clean carbs, but sounds like the tank may need some attention. Fill it with vinegar and let is sit for days. Then drain and flush it with salty water (to neutralize the vinegar), then blow it try with air, then flush it with alchohol., then blow it dry it again. Once you are certain it's bone dry, put a tank liner in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I haven't yet looked in the tank, I need to get the key from pops first, but the petcock was packed with sludge and I need to find a local place that sells the tank coating, probably a boat shop. I am going to coat the tank no matter how it looks. Everything I heard I can clean it with new gas, or something, and BBs or gravel (I was going to use some fish tank Peebles that we now have an abundance of) I will have to rewatch Ratherbwielding's video on it.
 

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Well i guess that could happen and you can skip that part if you are worried. The vinegar thing does work though. However, in my case, I had to do the vinegar cleaning a second time when I went to winterize it because there WAS some rust in there still and it had started to spread and cause debris. So this time I got some Por 15 and lined the tank after cleaning it a second time.
https://www.por15.com/POR-15-Fuel-Tank-Sealer

The product literature says it can be put right over rust so my thinking was that if there were just some tiny spots left, it should be fine. I guess I'll find out at the end of the season. :/
 
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