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Discussion Starter #1
This is a quote taken from a rider on another forum ventureriders.org
I think it sheds more light on mounting issues with the new 2018 Goldwing.

“Goldwing Quality?
A good riding friend just called and told me that he broke down on the road yesterday with his brand new 2018 Goldwing (only 750 miles on the odometer). Had to be trucked into a shop where they found that one of the pistons was completely burned thru. Apparently they are contacting Honda to see if the warranty will cover replacing the engine or the entire bike.

I've always imagined that Goldwings were bullet-proof and good for lots of miles. Seems like any motorcycle with a base price of $24K ought to be pretty thoroughly checked out. Who knows, maybe he was just unlucky with a once-in-a-million problem.
zag”
 

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I got my wife to sit on the back of a Venture and a Goldwing with me this past weekend. We noticed that the Venture has a ton more room ( a ton more for a motorcycle ) than the wing. She loves the backseat of my old wing, but the new one puts her crotch over the backrest hole. So I would not be able to have a backrest while she was on the back. I know she is supposed to be my backrest, and if I had my way she would be. In 90 plus degree weather neither one of us wants to be cuddled up on the bike. LOL So another win for the Venture.
 

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Pistons burn thru like that when the cylinder is running very lean. With only 750 miles on the GW that is the perfect example of the "infant mortality" that I was talking about in another thread.

When something is manufactured the odds are if something is going to fail, or was not put together right, it will fail very early on. Most likely within the first hours of operation, then the first tens of hours then the first hundreds of hours, becoming less and less likely on an exponential curve. For a machine like a motorcycle, if you make it to the first regular service interval (4000 miles for example) then the odds of something failing after that are extremely low.

If it hasnt shaken loose or exposed some kind of material or fabrication error by then, its probably all good for the next 100,000 miles.

So something making a piston run very lean and burning thru in 750 miles is not unusual. A complex machine like a motorcycles has several thousand parts / pieces. It only take one screw or nut, or resistor or transistor in the ECM, one loose connection... to render the entire motorcycle un-usable.

Honda will be all over that engine. When one engine out of a thousand fails, that broken motor is worth its weight in gold to the engineers - because it is the only thing that can tell them what has gone wrong and needs further attention, testing, screening... to keep failures out of delivered motorcycles.

A good company learns from every failure that hits the streets. A crappy company keeps cranking out crap and never resolves the problems with the design and fabrication.

There is another aspect here: engineers must resist their human nature, when something fails on a customers bike like that, to fix it as quickly as possible and give him his bike back. Its more important to get their hands on that bike and figure out the cause of the failure, than it is to slap another piston in the bike and a new fuel injector and get it back to him the next day.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Pistons burn thru like that when the cylinder is running very lean. With only 750 miles on the GW that is the perfect example of the "infant mortality" that I was talking about in another thread.

When something is manufactured the odds are if something is going to fail, or was not put together right, it will fail very early on. Most likely within the first hours of operation, then the first tens of hours then the first hundreds of hours, becoming less and less likely on an exponential curve. For a machine like a motorcycle, if you make it to the first regular service interval (4000 miles for example) then the odds of something failing after that are extremely low.

If it hasnt shaken loose or exposed some kind of material or fabrication error by then, its probably all good for the next 100,000 miles.

So something making a piston run very lean and burning thru in 750 miles is not unusual. A complex machine like a motorcycles has several thousand parts / pieces. It only take one screw or nut, or resistor or transistor in the ECM, one loose connection... to render the entire motorcycle un-usable.

Honda will be all over that engine. When one engine out of a thousand fails, that broken motor is worth its weight in gold to the engineers - because it is the only thing that can tell them what has gone wrong and needs further attention, testing, screening... to keep failures out of delivered motorcycles.

A good company learns from every failure that hits the streets. A crappy company keeps cranking out crap and never resolves the problems with the design and fabrication.

There is another aspect here: engineers must resist their human nature, when something fails on a customers bike like that, to fix it as quickly as possible and give him his bike back. Its more important to get their hands on that bike and figure out the cause of the failure, than it is to slap another piston in the bike and a new fuel injector and get it back to him the next day.
Might be why Yamaha has taken such a keen interest in my valve issue & also why it’s taking so long. I’ll have a completely new valve train including cam when this is done.
 

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The way it was explained in a process improvement training class:

when you have a machine that makes wooden bird houses, and all the bird houses are coming out with two screws that are 1/2 turn out too far

the human nature thing to do is run and get a hammer and pound those screws in all the way! problem: loose screw - solution HAMMER! Fix it QUICK!

instead of measuring each loose screw, the depth of the predrill, the torque threshold on the automated screw driver, and figuring out why they were not being screwed in correctly....
 

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So glad I did not end up buying the 2018 Honda GoldWing, it seems to have a lot of issues and Honda is not exactly known for being quick to correct the issues that are being found.

I think Honda is going to be hard headed on the suspension issue but they have backed themselves into a corner on it, they downsized the GoldWing to the point it just does not have enough storage and they are clearly aiming it at younger sport touring market, but by aiming at the sport touring market they made the suspension way to soft for that crowd and while the suspensions softness will appeal to the traditional GoldWing owner the storage down sizing has hurt that market.

Over all I think Honda tried to appeal to two different markets and may have ended up alienating the majority of both of them.

I am very happy with this Yamaha Star Venture and my biggest concern was the fuel mileage but that is now a non issue as right now my long term over all mileage on the bikes read out is up to 40.7 MPG and I am hand calculating fill ups in the low 40 MPG range to the mid 40 MPG range with the occasional tank at 46 and 47 MPG range.

I really don't know where Yamaha came up with the 34 MPG figure that is in the specs for this bike. I have far exceeded that.
 
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