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Discussion Starter #1
This weekend i'm picking up my first bike. A V Star 1100 Custom. Its about 100 miles away and I have access to a trailer to haul it back home. The only thing is that I dont want to have to drill holes in the bottom of the trailer becasue its not mine for a chock. Is there a good way to haul it back with just ratchet straps? I have tons and tons of them. I've never hauled a bike on a trailer before, and help is appreciated. Thanks!
 

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This weekend i'm picking up my first bike. A V Star 1100 Custom. Its about 100 miles away and I have access to a trailer to haul it back home. The only thing is that I dont want to have to drill holes in the bottom of the trailer becasue its not mine for a chock. Is there a good way to haul it back with just ratchet straps? I have tons and tons of them. I've never hauled a bike on a trailer before, and help is appreciated. Thanks!
We're so glad you asked!:)

First and foremost, the trailer MUST have a front "stop", preferably at least 12" high (higher is "gooder") You need to roll the bike onto and put the front wheel right up against the front lip. If you can't do that as step 1, find a different trailer.

When you have the front tire up against the stop, momentarily let the bike rest on its kickstand while you organize your straps. When you've got it fully strapped, the bike will be in gear, standing upright, kickstand UP. A rear chock is always a good idea, and if the trailer has a wooden floor you can use nails/screws to keep the chock in place.

My preference would be NEW, 600lb ratchet loadstraps. Inspect carefully for rips/separations, etc. Run at least two from the front of the bike using the upper front forks as leverage points. MAKE SURE the straps cannot slip down during transit. It is IMPERATIVE the straps remain solidly anchored and able to exert balancing forces against each other.

Adjust tension so that bike will stand perfectly upright on its own. Attach at least FOUR additional straps using SOLID leverage points (shocks, frame, etc) and adjust to ensure an even strain on both sides. If you want to use additional straps, you'll get no argument from me. It should go without saying that you'll want the straps attached to the bike as high as possible to help compress the front forks when you ratchet down.

Once you have the critter secured, raise the kickstand. Check the strap tensions after the first mile, and thereafter every 25 miles until you're satisfied they aren't loosening.


Oh. And welcome.:)

http://www.bukisa.com/articles/43076_how-to-strap-down-a-motorcycle-to-a-trailer
 

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+1 to Springers trailering tips.

My preference is to lock it down witrh straps and put it back into neutral before driving down the road with it.

I never used a rear wheel chock but I have run a strap laterally off both sides of the rear tire close to the floor. This keeps the ass end from wandering off towards either side. So in total; two diagonal straps off the front, two diagonal straps off the back, and one strap each off both sides of the rear tire.

Except for the straps to the rear tire, I ratchet the other 4 enough to compress the suspension a good inch or two.

Check strap tensions often especially if it's raining.
 

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oooops - I forgot one thing, don't cover the bike with a tarp, unless you really really enjoy polishing out scuff marks made by the tarp flapping against your chrome and paint.
 

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Welcome to the fun house ajohnson! I have to agree with what my buddies above said. My first choice would always be to just ride it back...unless you have still without an M endorsement.

Ride safe and keep the rubber side down!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well I do have my motorcycle permit, I just don't feel comfortable enough driving it back that far yet. I have a couple buddies that have offered if the weather is nice. Does anybody have a picture of what this looks like when a bike is all strapped down? Thanks for all the help!
 

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My first choice would always be to just ride it back...
+1000

Given a choice between trailering risks and riding risks, I'd ride it.

And one more point that may be of minor interest: INSURANCE!

Under normal circumstances, if the the bike gets loose and causes damage to other vehicles/property, the liability coverage on the towing vehicle will engage. But if you don't have comprehensive coverage on the bike itself, your insurance will NOT pay damages to the bike--just to the other vehicles/property involved.

And for reference, that holds true for all precious cargo carried in a pickup, on a trailer, rooftop carrier, etc. If the cargo (say a riding lawnmower, washer/dryer coming home from the store, etc) is not separately itemized in renter/homeowner insurance, and you sling it into the ditch, your vehicle insurance will NOT pay you a dime.

Caveat emptor...:(;)

Does anybody have a picture of what this looks like when a bike is all strapped down? Thanks for all the help!


Ask and ye shall receive, Grasshopper...

Not the best pic (straps are fastened too high on the trailer, but he's got some apparently down through ringbolts on the floor).
 

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Welcome aboard. Map out the trip home, take your time and ride it. What better way to learn. Make it an all day trip and have your buddies go with you. Just my 2 cents.
 
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