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Nice bike. When I get really comfortable with my VStar 650 and ready to move up I am going to keep this model in mind. I want a tourer bike except that I do not have the time to ride it on long trips.
Thanks @robbyk ! Nothing wrong with your 650. It’s a nice bike and if it’s your first bike, a very nice starter. If I may offer a suggestion? Not sure if that is your first bike but if it is, I’d recommend riding it for at least 2 years to get your skills honed before moving up to a dresser. The counter-steering and balancing skills you Garner now will become essential when handling a bike with a lot more mass. Someone mentioned here that “SLOW speed handling of a bike is TRUE riding skill”... they’re absolutely correct!
When you get to where stuff like setting up a corner BEFORE you go into it, or counter-steering or looking through a corner... when that becomes second nature muscle memory THEN you’ll be ready to move up.

Any other longtime dresser rider wanna chime in here if I’m off??

Not trying to discourage your goals in any way @robbyk , just wanted to share some realistic milestones for you to reach your dream. 😁
In the meantime, enjoy the heck outta that nice 650 and always remember to keep the shiny side UP and ride your OWN ride.

Peace out brother!
 

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I have a Strat and a 650 and the riding style is way different, And I would still like to see a slow speed contest in Waynesville.
 

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ChiefGunner, I agree about time under your belt before moving up to a full dresser. Good example about how easily one can get away from you. In Waynesville at our forum meet and greet with what seemed like the entire forum watching I dropped my bike with my wife on the back. Went to put my foot down to stop. Stepped on rock. Foot slipped and there is no stopping over a 1000 pounds of bike and people. The rock I stepped on was only one reason. The other was I watching the people around me and not what I was doing. Plus those who know me will agree I'm vertically challenged. All was good as the only thing that was hurt was my pride. The other comment I'll make about an experienced riders. Miles don't make you experienced, being able to handle traffic situations, parking lot maneuvering, being on an incline and tight turns makes an experienced rider. Just take your time and when you are ready to move up, you will know it.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
there is a physics involved on when you will drop your bike and how hard........the more people watching and number of them who will rag on you for dropping it , will increase the chances of dropping the bike and making the wife complain the whole while all your friends are laughing....... 😀
 

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ChiefGunner, I agree about time under your belt before moving up to a full dresser. Good example about how easily one can get away from you. In Waynesville at our forum meet and greet with what seemed like the entire forum watching I dropped my bike with my wife on the back. Went to put my foot down to stop. Stepped on rock. Foot slipped and there is no stopping over a 1000 pounds of bike and people. The rock I stepped on was only one reason. The other was I watching the people around me and not what I was doing. Plus those who know me will agree I'm vertically challenged. All was good as the only thing that was hurt was my pride. The other comment I'll make about an experienced riders. Miles don't make you experienced, being able to handle traffic situations, parking lot maneuvering, being on an incline and tight turns makes an experienced rider. Just take your time and when you are ready to move up, you will know it.
Could have been a lot worse. It could have gave you a hernia
 

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there is a physics involved on when you will drop your bike and how hard........the more people watching and number of them who will rag on you for dropping it , will increase the chances of dropping the bike and making the wife complain the whole while all your friends are laughing....... 😀
There’s a lot of truth to that. It’s like having a piece of bread with jelly on it... The odds of you dropping it and it lands jelly side down are equally proportional to the mess it will make OR the cost of the carpet! 😁
 

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Thanks @robbyk I’d recommend riding it for at least 2 years to get your skills honed before moving up to a dresser. The counter-steering and balancing skills you Garner now will become essential when handling a bike with a lot more mass. Someone mentioned here that “SLOW speed handling of a bike is TRUE riding skill”... they’re absolutely correct!
When you get to where stuff like setting up a corner BEFORE you go into it, or counter-steering or looking through a corner... when that becomes second nature muscle memory THEN you’ll be ready to move up.

Any other longtime dresser rider wanna chime in here if I’m off??

Not trying to discourage your goals in any way @robbyk , just wanted to share some realistic milestones for you to reach your dream. 😁
In the meantime, enjoy the heck outta that nice 650 and always remember to keep the shiny side UP and ride your OWN ride.

Peace out brother!
I totally agree with y'all. The VStar 650 is my first bike. I follow this retired Motorcycle Police Officer on Youtube - Ride like a Pro. He says in his videos "Maximum Control - If you can't control the bike at slow speeds, you don't have control of the bike period". I am focusing on slow speed turns, U-turns, full 360 turns at no more than 8 MPH, etc.
On weekends I go to an empty parking lot and setup small cones (pegs), similar to the ones they use at the Harley Motorcycle Safety Class. The principle is "ride the clutch", it is all about the friction zone and throttle, tapping the rear brake when necessary. Staying upright and balanced at slow speeds requires orchestration of clutch, throttle, and brake, along with precise lean and steering angles, body positioning, and visual focus.

The reason I did not want to buy a new bike as my first bike is in line with what @ChiefGunner said, not until I Garner and counter steering and balancing skills necessary to handle a bike with more mass.
In the mean time I am loving my VStar 650.
 

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Sounds like you've got all your ducks in a row, Robby. It will pay the first time you have to use those skills to avoid a road hazard or crash.
 
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