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Welcome Taimoor. The 950 is a great bike and lots of forum members own and love them. I have an 1100 as my first cruiser and I absolutely love it. Post a pic when you can!
 

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"Loose Nut"
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Welcome from Houston, Texas. You have some pretty scenery to ride in this time of year. Ride often and safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks everyone. I always think about riders in south and north, as we have lesblank and northen rider here in comments from both sides of the continent. One ride whole year and other may be for two or three months. What you guys think about your riding opportunities.
Gethonomix I had bought my bike in April 2016 from Wisconsin almost 110 miles from my home and before that I have never ridden a big cruiser. I have been riding small bikes the max I have had is Honda Road Master 200cc parallel twin.
Honda cd 200. Best photos and information of modification.
So Vstar 950 was really heavy for me and 110 miles back home, first I freaked out on highway (no windshield at that time)then I figure out how to handle this bike and now I am very comfortable but yup you are right it took some time.
Definitely I will upload pics
 

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Up here the riding season is short, too short. I bought my bike last November and put on about 100 rather chilly miles before I had to park it. Last winter felt very long and with all the snow it made riding season feel even further away. I took it out on a couple of days in March when it was above freezing and the roads were dry, but again, not a lot of fun. It wasn't until May until we started having a few days in the mid teens Celsius (around 55 - 60 F). The weather finally warmed up in June and since then I've been riding every day that it isn't raining (my truck is feeling very neglected, I'm sure). Got almost 6000 miles on her so far this season. June, July, August, and most of September are prime riding months here. I expect I'll be parking it again in October, maybe into November if the weather holds.

So, to answer your question, overall, the season is too short and now that I've had the summer to ride and really get used to my bike and get back into riding I know this winter is going to be even longer. If I were younger I'd consider moving to a warmer clime...lol.
 

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"Loose Nut"
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In Houston I commute daily year round. Only freezes a few times a year so cold is not big of a deal. It's the heat that will get to you. It's been in the high 90s here last week with heat index of 107 to 110. Stop and go traffic can really be tough. Most people don't realize we get moisture out of the Gulf with afternoon showers several times a week. That's when you get the 100 degree day with close to 100% humidity. You are right about benefits of a windshield. I ride with a windshield during the cooler months and without during the summer. It's like riding two different bikes. On the highway I like my windshield. In stop and go traffic it's cooler without. So enjoy your riding weather now and don't forget to winterize your bike when weather turns too cold to ride. We have a lot of posts every spring with starting issues caused by starting issues of improperly stored bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Northern rider we have almost same weather here in Chicago. Riding season starts from late April to September, with april n sept chilly nights. lesblank what you mean by proper storage of bike. I parked my bike in garage and put my battery on a battery charger, is it enough.
Keith you are also a member of V star owners club at facebook?
I can't attach a picture, when I drag it in drag n drop bar the picture disappears
 

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I top up my fuel tank and add fuel stabilizer, then take one last spin around the block before putting her away for the winter so the stabilizer gets to the carbs. Since my shed isn't heated I also remove the battery, bring it in where it's warm and put it on a battery tender. Once a month I put the battery back in and fire it up for a few minutes, just to keep everything moving and lubed. I also give the tires a half turn so they don't get a flat spot from sitting.

I'm sure you'll get many different winter storage methods from other members but this seemed to work for me. She fired right up last spring and has been running just fine all summer.
 

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Thanks NorthernRider for answering about winterizing your bike. Maybe a few more will chime in what works for them. Hey, y'all could always come put them in my garage and I could ride it every couple of days to keep it in running order. :)
 

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Yes Taimoor I am a member there as well.
As NorthernRider eluded to, there's many different methods members use. I add stabil and top of the tank as I run ethanol free gas 90% of the time. I leave the battery on a battery tender and place the tires on an old thick piece of carpet in the garage. I make sure the tires are aired to the correct pressure and monthly move my bike around so the tires don't flat spot over the winter. Here in the mountains you can ride up to early November, but after that not much until April. Occasionally there'll be a few days in the 50s so I'll gear up and head out for a ride. I'll even fire it up during the winter months to keep everything lubed up and cover it up after the it cools down.


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Thanks NorthernRider for answering about winterizing your bike. Maybe a few more will chime in what works for them. Hey, y'all could always come put them in my garage and I could ride it every couple of days to keep it in running order. :)
Appreciate the offer, les, but I wouldn't want to cause you any additional "work" :wink:
 

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I just noticed you said you put it on a battery charger for the winter, Taimoor. Make sure it's a battery tender, as a charger could overcharge and ruin your battery over the winter. A battery tender gives it a slow, low amp charge as needed to maintain it and won't overcharge.
 
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