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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a new rider. Rode when I was younger, but that was decades ago.

I took the MTC course - and had no issues with lean in the course at all. A few days after the course, purchased a V-Star 950 - which I am thoroughly enjoying. It was on the fist or second day that was making a left turn, and scraped going around. Scared the sh*t out of me. I simply reminded myself that this is just something to be expected with this bike, and moved on. I've scraped a few times since then.

I'm finding that I'm now a bit nervous going around corners - wondering at what angle that scraping noise is going to come at. It's messing with my confidence overall. I know if I could get to the point of knowing when that scrape is going to come, I'll be a lot better off.

I feel like training for this is a bit of a catch-22. Trying to progressively and intentionally increase lean until it happens seems to make sense. The issue is intentionally doing something that I know is going to startle me in traffic doesn't seem like a good idea. On the other hand, the speeds necessary to cause this is greater than is a good idea in parking lots. I do have access to a couple of relatively large lots, but I'm not sure they are quite big enough for this. They are also security patrolled, and I'm not sure they are going to be very welcoming of someone driving through their lots fast enough to cause the scraping.

I'm open to suggestions.
 
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You should be trying to not make the bike scrape, not practice scraping.

If you really wanna go around corners that fast, shift your weight to the inside of the turn, so the bike does not lean so far.

I have to say, if you are taking every corner at the edge of traction, you have no escape options when someone or something is in the way.

If you want to push a motorcycle to its limits, get a dirt bike: seriously. You can power slide them and lock the brakes up and have it slide out on you, and get back up and do it all day long. I had one for 30 years.
 
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i've had my '09 950 since i bought it new in '09. from what i've seen on multiple bike forums over the years, the 950 scrapes more than any other production bike. my advice is to accept it. i look at it like an audible guide telling you that you're approaching the limit to your lean angle. my bike is lowered 2.25" so i scrape more than probably anyone else. i've got over 80K miles on mine and there is plenty of metal left on my boards. as KCW mentioned, you can change how you take turns and lean more with your body so that you lean the bike less, and thus are less likely to scrape. but don't look at scraping your floorboards as you doing something wrong or damaging the boards. and even adjusting your weight you are still going to scrape the more aggressive you are in taking leans and turns but you are not hurting anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You should be trying to not make the bike scrape, not practice scraping.
Maybe I wasn't clear in my intention. I agree about the goal of not scraping. The only reason I was thinking "get used to it", is so I know at what point it will happen and have it not be so startling if it does. The fear of being startled by scraping is screwing with my general confidence, and that's the part I'm trying to get past.
 
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I'm a new rider. Rode when I was younger, but that was decades ago.

I took the MTC course - and had no issues with lean in the course at all. A few days after the course, purchased a V-Star 950 - which I am thoroughly enjoying. It was on the fist or second day that was making a left turn, and scraped going around. Scared the sh*t out of me. I simply reminded myself that this is just something to be expected with this bike, and moved on. I've scraped a few times since then.

I'm finding that I'm now a bit nervous going around corners - wondering at what angle that scraping noise is going to come at. It's messing with my confidence overall. I know if I could get to the point of knowing when that scrape is going to come, I'll be a lot better off.

I feel like training for this is a bit of a catch-22. Trying to progressively and intentionally increase lean until it happens seems to make sense. The issue is intentionally doing something that I know is going to startle me in traffic doesn't seem like a good idea. On the other hand, the speeds necessary to cause this is greater than is a good idea in parking lots. I do have access to a couple of relatively large lots, but I'm not sure they are quite big enough for this. They are also security patrolled, and I'm not sure they are going to be very welcoming of someone driving through their lots fast enough to cause the scraping.

I'm open to suggestions.


This is good advice
 

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Matt the 950 scrapes the easiest as bevo referred to as I ride an 09' 950. It sits low already and is quite easy to scrape. I've scraped a few times but started practicing what KCW suggested in moving my weight to the inside of the turn, and it works. One thing that was stressed in my MSF course from April of 2016 was not being too aggressive in cornering and maxing out your bikes capabilities. It's natural to be concerned with just getting back into riding. Just my .02 cents worth. I'd look for a large Walmart parking lot or similar lot early in the morning or late in the evening and practice. Hope this helps.


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I think most important thing to keep in mind is to understand that scraping once in a while is normal and doesn't mean you're on the verge of loosing control. I don't think I'd specifically practice for scrapping, through the natural course of riding you'll figure that out. I remember when I took the MSF coruce and scraped a peg, the instructor gave me a thumbs up.
 

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In my last MSF course, there was a pattern that had sharp turns in it. You had no choice but to scrape. If scraping scares you now while in traffic, you should practice in a safe place, until you are not scared of it. Then, when you scrape in traffic, you will not be startled. Not saying that you should go scraping all over the place, but get used to it.

If you work on avoiding a scrape, you may be limiting you riding skills unnecessarily. And, may not be prepared for when it does happen in a bad situation. Can you imagine having to make a sharp turn to avoid an accident, you scrape a floorboard, you panic or over-correct, and then have an accident?

Remember, Perfect Practice makes Perfect. - I think I should copyright that phrase ;)

Ride safe and Enjoy the Ride!

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #9

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Discussion Starter #10
... Then, when you scrape in traffic, you will not be startled. Not saying that you should go scraping all over the place, but get used to it.

If you work on avoiding a scrape, you may be limiting you riding skills unnecessarily. And, may not be prepared for when it does happen in a bad situation. Can you imagine having to make a sharp turn to avoid an accident, you scrape a floorboard, you panic or over-correct, and then have an accident?
This is precisely my thinking. I'm not interested in aggressive riding in general, and this really isn't the right bike that type of riding anyway. I like the idea of just being comfortable enough with hearing a scrape to not have it startle me and cause me to react in a way that is dangerous. As you pointed out, this is particularly critical in an emergency situation.
 
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It becomes load more fun, and the sound changes a lot, when you start skipping the bike on the frame.

I did that once, and learned not to ride this turn near my house so wide anymore, have to hug it tight. The turn is on a steep hill so I'm leaning into an uphill slope, really makes it hard not to hit. But this time I had a passenger and it really hit hard, and the back tire skipped a few times till I finished the turn. I believe it took me about 10degrees extra lean after scrapping for that to happen.

Hoping changing out the back spring with the progressive shock will help fix that also, as it will handle more weight nicer. Front ones also, but overall.
 

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MattF, lots of sound advice and I have one other suggestion that I use to enhance my riding skill. Purchase a set of small traffic cones and if you have your owner's manual and it came with the motorcycle riding tips/practice guide, you'll find exercises that will help to make your turns less stressful. I use the traffic cones to set up an area for U-turns, tight turns, stopping practice, etc. You mentioned that you have a few parking lots in your area and one of the suggestions in the guide is to contact the owner of the lot and let them know/ask permission to use the lot for practicing. I'm mention like Keith said to let them know you'd only use it for off times. Just my dime.
 

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Even if you don't intend to hit the track all of Keith Code's books are excellent reads and help even street riders become more proficient at keeping the rubber side down and riding safely by changing your thought process and teaching solid riding techniques and theories.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Any feedback on the DVD? I've been watching the youtube videos, debating buying the DVD.
From the little I've seen on youtube of the videos, it's identical to what is on the DVD. The DVD may be more complete instead of short clips. Also, comes with a guide written leaflet that shows the exercises and how to set up for them.

I also personally believe in supporting people that do the work, which is a big part of the reason I bought the DVD instead of tracking down all of the individual videos.
 
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