Yamaha Starbike Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here it is in a nutshell. I'm 42 and haven't been on a bike in over 20 years. I'd been back and forth about it but have decided to pull the trigger and buy a V Star 250 for a variety of reasons. I'm looking at a new 2013 because they're still "new" but the internet list price is $3,000 and locally there are 4 dealers that have them. Each one has told me the price is rock bottom to get them gone and no room for negotiation. I believe price is always negotiable. The OTD cost will be around $3800. Pay it and be happy? Spend more time trying to haggle the price that they don't seem willing to move on? Thoughts?

just FYI. I've been at 1 dealer, with $3,200 cash in hand and he wouldn't budge on the fees to make the sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,650 Posts
Welcome to the forum. I know it's impolite to answer a question with a question but I have to. Why are you looking at a 250? If you rode before, it wouldn't take you to long to get back in the swing of things and then you'll want to upgrade to bigger. Tell us a bit more about yourself, where you hail from and of course your train of thought on the 250.

Ride safe and keep it shiny side up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm Craig from a small town north of Atlanta GA right at the foothills of the Blue Ridge mountains. Lots of bikes riding through the mountain roads in the summer time.

My food for thought on the 250 is first that it gets 80mpg. I know I won't get that but I'll be taking back roads to work everyday and this will be my commuter. I'll keep it even if I upgrade later. It's a 250 and it's light so if I drop it, it's light enough for me to get back up. I'm not planning on having passengers on it for a while so I don't need tons of power. Plus, I can get one new for $3k so I can pretty much cash and carry. For the fuel economy, price and my experience level, it seems like the best option right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Craig--I know others will not agree but I think you are on the right track.
I started riding again this season after 40 years without riding.
And I bought a Suzuki GZ 250. Similar size and weight as the VStar 250.
I rode all season--enjoyed the heck out of it. Did not worry about dropping it and it is so nimble, I could maneuver it easily anywhere I wanted. Now mine was used but had only 1900 miles on it.
I also think your thinking is sound because you plan to keep the bike even after you upgrade to a bigger bike.
Good Luck and Ride Safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
For what its worth, I'm 43 and the last bike I was on was an 80cc dirt bike when I was about 10. I bought an 1100 this past April and would be miserable on anything smaller I believe. Granted I don't commute with it but I can maneuver it in town just as easy as the back roads.have no issues with weight. I would take that three grand and either buy a bigger used bike or if you are stuck on a 250 I would still go used and save some cash. If you think a car looses value once driven off the lot wait till you ride that 250 off. If I had it to do over I would have bought a roadstar and never looked back. But that's just my opinion based on my preferences. And ya know what they say about opinions...:D whatever you decide ride it and enjoy. They do you no good sitting in a garage collecting dust.

As far as dropping it...when done properly a small person can upright a very large bike. If you are referring to dropping it as in crash, well I believe a 250 can hurt you just as much as a Start.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,110 Posts
howdy. unless you plan on keeping that 250 for a long time, i would suggest looking for a used one. you may find pretty soon that you want to upgrade to a bigger model, and you'll have lost a good portion of your investment from having bought it brand new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
My food for thought on the 250 is first that it gets 80mpg. I know I won't get that but I'll be taking back roads to work everyday and this will be my commuter. I'll keep it even if I upgrade later. For the fuel economy, price and my experience level, it seems like the best option right now.
Yep. Been there. Still there. The 250 is one of my two bikes and I was getting 74mpg city.

I agree with most here in that I recommend that you to explore the used 250's available in your area before you make the purchase. You can usually get a close-to-spotless bike with less than 3,000 miles on it for $1500 or less if you watch and wait. I don't know what your area's like, but there's a pretty clean '07 with a couple of extras in the Pittsburgh CL right now @ an asking price of $1400 with 7,000 miles on the clock. When the first flakes of snow fly here, the prices being asked usually plummet.

You can take a very small part of the $2300 you save and pimp the thing to your heart's desire like I did to mine.
I'm much happier with it than I ever would have been with a brand new stock purchase.

As far as the dealers, I was offered a new 2012 in the summer of 2012 for $3750 OTD. That included tax, title, plates, everything.
Even with the Yammi MSRP increase in 2013, I wouldn't even think about paying $3800 OTD for a year-old model.

Just a thought, if I'd only had one bike, I'd have missed the last 5 weeks of riding. A lady on script narcotics rear-ended me on my 250 and her insurance company has tried to screw me as many ways as they possibly could. Had I known they were going to be this way, I would have demanded a rental just for the sake of justice. I would have also missed any decent riding opportunities for the next month or two while I wait for the state to send my certificate of salvage, then repair the bike myself (essentially providing my own labor for free), and then jump through the hoops of getting it back on the road with an "R" title.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I plan to keep the 250 indefinitely for the mpg and use it mainly to commute back and forth to work. The savings from driving my 4 door 4x4 truck everyday, the bike will pay for itself in 7 months just in fuel savings. A $60 fill up verses a $6 fill up every 3 days will add up quick. I will probably get a 2nd bike once I get my confidence in being able to carry a passenger and want the upgrade.

In the meantime though, I'm thinking I should go ahead and get the 250 and start saving the $$$ on gas and just pay the OTD price they seem firm to sell them for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yep. Been there. Still there. The 250 is one of my two bikes and I was getting 74mpg city.

I agree with most here in that I recommend that you to explore the used 250's available in your area before you make the purchase. You can usually get a close-to-spotless bike with less than 3,000 miles on it for $1500 or less if you watch and wait. I don't know what your area's like, but there's a pretty clean '07 with a couple of extras in the Pittsburgh CL right now @ an asking price of $1400 with 7,000 miles on the clock. When the first flakes of snow fly here, the prices being asked usually plummet.

You can take a very small part of the $2300 you save and pimp the thing to your heart's desire like I did to mine.
I'm much happier with it than I ever would have been with a brand new stock purchase.

As far as the dealers, I was offered a new 2012 in the summer of 2012 for $3750 OTD. That included tax, title, plates, everything.
Even with the Yammi MSRP increase in 2013, I wouldn't even think about paying $3800.
I've thought long and hard about going that route. I'm really handy with a wrench but know nothing about motorcycle repairs and try and stay within my limitations until I learn. I'd rather have used to save the cash but afraid I may just be buying someone elses problems and not experienced enough to know how to fix it myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
In the meantime though, I'm thinking I should go ahead and get the 250 and start saving the $$$ on gas and just pay the OTD price they seem firm to sell them for.
Sounds like you came in here asking a question, but with your mind already made up.

Personally, I was ready to upgrade from my 650 really quickly. The question I'd ask myself if I was you, is how fast do you want to go? The 250 is a 70 mph bike, just like my 650 will go 90. It'll do it, but I feel like I'm on a buzzbomb anywhere past 80.

I won't try to talk you into a bigger bike, but showroom condition used 250s are available for a huge savings. Most of the time they're purchased for people who like the idea of riding a motorcycle more than actually riding a motorcycle.

Here's a 2011 250 in amazing condition in Savannah with under 2500 miles, plus an aftermarket sissy bar/luggage rack asking $2500. http://atlanta.craigslist.org/atl/mcd/4686382016.html

If paying 50% more for a very comparable bike makes you feel more comfortable, that's your business. IMHO you've got a 90% chance of buying a bike that's like new. But even if you bought one with a slipping clutch and in need of carb work, you could get that stuff professionally sorted at the dealership and still have an extra $800 in your pocket. Good luck with whatever decision you make.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
Hi and welcome to the forum. Cant add much more than my fellow forum members have already shared with you. As you can tell, our forum has a lot of great insight from great members. Ultimately its your decision. My son in law lives near you and rides a 2012 250 that is bone stock. He commutes on it year round and loves it. When i got on it, i felt as though i was on a 10 speed bicycle in comparison to my 09' 950t. After nearly a 20 year absence of riding, i started back on a Honda 700vt, then moved over to a yamaha 650, and now my 950t. The 950t fits me perfectly and im not a real big guy at 5' 11" and now under 200 pounds thanks to advocare. I am in agreement with possibly looking at a slightly used 250. With a keen eye i doubt youd get someone elses problems as the 250's arent generally dogged out. As your skills return and your confidence builds, upsizing will come naturally. Just my 1.5 cents worth, however which ever way you choose to go, keep us updated, and hope the feedback has been helpful. Ride safely!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
I understand what you're saying.
You want the thing to be rock-solid dependable for the commute from day one without having to "re-build it".
However, it's pretty difficult to hurt one of these in less than 3,000 miles. Especially in a way that's not glaringly novice-test-drive noticeable.

My '95 250 Virago was plug and play. I'd ridden a '85 Honda 250 special for a little less than a season then test drove and bought the '03 650 custom. I test drove and bought the Virago the next year. The only thing I ever had to do to the Virago was buy a new battery after the first year and a half, jump on it, ride it, and pay the yearly inspection fee for three years running now. I've replaced the battery, had the tires replaced, and paid for three inspection fees on the 650.

I totally agree with pangea33. "IMHO you've got a 90% chance of buying a bike that's like new." IMHO, your chances are better than 90%. You should (even as a 'born again' novice) be able to tell if you're test driving "one with a slipping clutch and in need of carb work". If not, test drive a few new and/or slightly used ones at the dealers to see how they should run and feel @ 100% before you start test driving slightly used ones in the open market.

Seriously, other than asking us, it seems like you're practicing "armchair guessing" instead of informed and experienced analysis to begin with. What have you got to loose by test driving a few pampered beauties (some with as little as 500 miles on them) priced @ up to 50% less than what the dealers want for "new" '13s?

Actually, it's hard to hurt these things at all. The little sh*ts will run forever if you're the least bit reasonable with them.

The carbs will gum and gunk up (like any carbs) if you don't use a treatment once in a while and you let the bike sit with gas in the tank and line for a year or so. You have to adjust the chain every season or so. In my case, I was constantly downshifting hard, so, though mine is still on it's first chain, that chain is almost maxxed out @ 5195 miles. Have all the "next" scheduled maintainance done as soon as you get the bike home. If you want, for your peace of mind, change all fluids and have whatever done that should have been done in the mileage showing on the OD whether the seller said it was done recently or not. A lot of that is time sensitive as well as mileage sensitive.

It sounds like you'll be putting enough miles on the bike (I figured 7,000+ miles from you "gas savings" figures) that you'll probably run the tread out on the 6-or-7 year old originals in a season. You can google on how to read the tire mfg dates. Check your tire inprints on those dealer '13's too. Some of them might just might have tires on them that were made in '10 or '11.

I don't know what the official Yammi offerings are on new. If you get free scheduled maintainance for a couple of years, new may be well worth it. If not, your dealer doing scheduled maintainance is going to eat into part of your gas savings. Then again, (and I've even had to argue this point with some fellow riders) either way, you'll be saving wear and tear on your 4X4. Even if you're completely set on buying new (there's just nothing like that brand new bike interior smell :D) you'd loose nothing and gain some experience and insight by testing a few slightly used gems.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top