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Hello john from georgia. I am a new rider and proud owner of a beautiful yamaha 650 classic 2005 with 4854 miles on it. Just trying to get tips and advice on oil and service intervals. And riding tips, as well as riding gear. Thanks. Message_1520112320952_1520133993344.jpg
 

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Welcome from Houston, Texas. Nice looking bike. If you have guestions post them in correct thread to get so great responses. There are a lot of 650 riders here so I'm sure you will get some feedback. Don't forget to checkout our Bike of the Month.

StarBikeForums Bike of the Month - Star Motorcycle Forums: Star Raider, V-Max, V-Star, Road-Star Forum

Here's a few other threads of interest.

http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/49-v-star/5655-yammy-ya-got.html?highlight=Yammy

http://www.starbikeforums.com/forums/36-lounge/110258-where-you.html

Ride safe and often.
 

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the owners manual and service manual for the Vstar 650 are both on the internet in pdf format.

The maintenance intervals in the service manual are reasonable. I think the first couple are at 600 and 4000 miles, so your bike is really just getting broken in. Hard to believe its 13 years old.

If you don't know how old the oil is you might want to change the oil and filter. There is also 80W oil in the final drive on the back wheel, that is really easy to change.

The bike is old enough that I would pump all the brake fluid out of the reservoir, fill it with brand new Dot4, then pump (bleed) it through till it comes out clear at the bleeder valve. Its so easy to do, and will only cost you a few bucks, getting that old brake fluid out of your cylinders will be worth it. To be clear, you never want to pump air through the master cylinder - so syphon or suck all the fluid out of the open reservoir on the brake lever assemble with a hand pump, then fill it back up with new fluid, then pump the new fluid through by bleeding the caliper cylinder on the wheel.

Some people will tell you to change your tires - they are probably the original tires. The back tire normally lasts for about 8,000 miles and the front tire will go twice as long if you are not nuts about stopping hard with the front brake. If you are riding the bike really hard in the corners those old tires are going to be hard, and may be dry rot (cracking?). If you are just puttering around on the bike, and you are not riding the interstates at 65+Mph, they might be ok for a little while. But when you get your confidence up and start pushing the bike hard, get new tires.

So just two more things for maintenance:

The valve clearance is listed to be checked and adjusted every 4000 miles. The first 600, and 4000 mile checks are the most important, because that is when the valves settle in the most. If you cannot be sure they were done at 4k miles, then don't wait too long. If the valves wear in they seat tighter, which can keep them from closing all the way - then the high compression gasses will start to blow through when the piston fires, and it will burn the edges of the valves.

You have to take the carbs off the bike to check all four valves, so its at least 2 hours if you are good at it. The first time might take you 3 hours if you have to learn what you are doing as you go along. After the 4k mile check you can let it go for maybe 8000 miles, they don't change so much as the bike wears in.

The last thing is your air filter - if it does not look white like paper, get a new one. A dirty air filter on a MC will choke off a surprising amount of air and starve your engine. If it looks like an old grey tee shirt, you will see how much the bike comes to life when you replace it.

The MSF riding course material has excellent recommendations for riding gear. I think you can download the beginners course manual online for free. I would recommend a full face helmet (unless you don't like your face and teeth), a textile or leather MC riding jacket (not a Wilson Farms Mall jacket), riding gloves, and riding boots. If you are going to ride on the interstate highways get riding pants too. If you are mostly on secondary roads or commuting, a good pair of heavy jeans will get by, but you may get some road rash if you get knocked off your bike.

Since I already mentioned it, if you have not taken the MSF beginners course I would recommend it. I took it to get my license (instead of doing the road test thing) and I was amazed at how many things I did not know, and how many things I had been doing wrong. I have owned off road MCs for over 30 years, did not ride on the streets for more than a couple years, so I thought the MSF course would be a formality. The things I learned have saved me from wrecking my 2005 Vstar 650 many many times in the 5 years since I took the course.

Guessing ahead for what you might ask: the most common question new Vstar riders asks is "My bike wont start, or my bike quits when I shift into gear". If you try to start in gear or shift your bike into gear with the kickstand down, the engine shuts off. It happens to just about everyone sooner or later. With the kickstand down it will only run in neutral.

you got a great bike - they are incredibly reliable and very easy to ride. You can expect to put at least another 80k to 100k miles on that odo. The only other thing after 13 years, you can go around the bike with a spray can of white lithium grease, get your kickstand pivot, the clutch cable, and any other moving or sliding parts - check the service or owners manual for lube points.
 

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Welcome to the forum from East Tennessee, nice looking bike there. Where in the peach state do you hail from? In September we’re planning a Southeast Regional members ride to Maggie Valley, NC. Come join us. For more information follow the ongoing thread about the group ride.


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Discussion Starter #6
Kcw thanks for the thread. I put tara in the shop, to have every little detail inspected. The valves adjusted. The fluids serviced. The tires inapected. I downloaded the owners manual to my laptop. Im going to print it out and do the same for the service manual. I really like the vstar. It is hard to believe only 4887 after riding it a few days being that old. But it is a back and forth to work bike. As of right now. I am slated to go take a motorcycle saftey course on my birthday weekend. The 23 and 24 and that is where i will obtain my liscense. After that the sky is the limit. Might drive out to vegas. Lol. Or do some of the iron ass challanges ive read about. Just to get experience and take in the scenery. Thanks so much for the help. I saw the intervals 4k 8k and so on. But npw im getting conflicted on the oil change interval is it the same or do i change it at 1k sorry for the ignorance.
 

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Welcome to the forum from East Tennessee, nice looking bike there. Where in the peach state do you hail from? In September we’re planning a Southeast Regional members ride to Maggie Valley, NC. Come join us. For more information follow the ongoing thread about the group ride.


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Hi keith, I am Snellville ga. Just down from stone mountain. If you would like send me a link to the club and ill be glad to take a look and see if it is something i would be interested in. Thanks buddy safe riding and rubber side down.
 

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the recommended service table starts on page 6-3 of the owners manual.

When the bike is new they want you to do the service when the odo gets to 600 miles. That is to flush out anything that might be in the engine oil, check and adjust the valve clearance, and go over the entire bike to make sure nothing has come loose during the break in period.

After that, oil changes every 4000 miles on the odo, oil filter every 8000 miles on the odo, check the valves again for at least the first couple 4000 mile intervals. After that the other stuff starts kicking in, spark plugs, air filter...

Check the table in the manual, it will make more sense than I can explain.

The engineers that designed these bikes did excellent work - they are well designed and very reliable. They also wrote the service tables, so I default to them unless someone can give me a really compelling reason to do otherwise.

The one thing that is not listed in the service table is the lube on the shaft drive splines. In theory if they are lubed correctly at the factory the shaft drive is pretty much maintenance free for a very long time. There were a few 650s made before 2000 that were not lubed right, and the splines stripped out, so you might hear some horror stories about that.

But every time you take the back wheel off you need to pay attention to the shaft splines. The shaft comes off with the back wheel so you get to see one right there. If it looks like the lube is thin or its all nasty you can wipe it down and put on new Moly 60 % drive shaft spline.

Dont use ANYTHING else. If you take your bike to Joes MC shop to get the tire replaced, make sure they do not wipe off your Moly 60% from the shaft and put bearing grease or some other cheap moly on there. That is one way to ruin the splines. Moly is used for lot of things on vehicles, but it has to be at least 60% for the splines, or it will all fling off and run dry.

There are also a few more splines in the hub assembly end on the wheel. You have to pull a spring clip off to get those out, and check them and re-lube them. There are many threads on how to do this, and drawings in the service manual. Again: in theory you should not have to mess with this, but if you got the wheel off for a new tire its about 30 minutes - and that is a good interval to at least check and make sure everything looks ok.

Remember the 60% moly. Its expensive stuff, which is why you need to make sure some mechanic doesnt wipe it off and put some other grease on the splines.

Compared to having a chain that needs oiling every 500 miles, constant adjustment and frequent replacement along with the rear sprocket, having a shaft drive is a miracle. Even drive belts need to be replaced eventually. So dealing with the moly 60 on the splines is very simple by comparison, and you should never have to replace any of them.
 

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Just pull up the ongoing thread of 2018 Regional Members Meeting-Southeast. It’s be September 20-22 at Maggie Valley, NC. The Waynesville Inn is willing to give us a block of rooms for the weekend if we get enough reservations. They’re calling it the Yamaha meet and greet. On Friday morning we’re planning to meet and tour the ‘Wheels through Time’ museum and ride the dragon tail. There’s also a festival scheduled for the area and other bike runs going on. Please try to make it if you can. We’re hoping to make it an annual event if we get enough participation.


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