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Discussion Starter #1
Thought I'd start out proper and introduce myself.
I'm an old geezer just getting back into bike riding.
Rode trail bikes a lot when i was kid and when got drivers license rode the streets for a couple years. Got away from riding for over 40 years.
Now that I'm older and can't play sports and be as active as I used to be, I decided riding bikes would be some fun and a hobby I could enjoy.
Been away from riding for a long time and have a lot to learn.
Recently purchased a 2012 V Star 950 tourer. I’ll be looking for some help from all you experienced riders.
 

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I got my license when I was 56, 6 years ago, and have been loving every minute on two wheels ever since.

A lot has changed over the years. If you presently do no have your MC license I recommend you sign up for the MSF beginners course - its 3 days, you get to learn on their nice honda 250s, and on the last day you get your MC license stamp - and about 10% off your MC insurance for the rest of your life.

If you have your license then taking the beginners course is still worth the couple hundred dollars - most people develop bad riding habits on their own, learning from experienced riding instructions is the best way to improve your riding and not-falling-over skills. (the first thing they teach you is how to get on a MC and get back off without dropping it... because it happens to riders more than we want to admit).

Things have changed, now more than ever you need to ride as if you are invisible, and have a plan and the skills to avoid accidents.
If you stay off 4 lane roads, stay off the interstates, and ride on secondary roads thru the country, its much safer and more enjoyable.

Welcome back to the 2 wheel community.
 

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Welcome you are in the same boat as a lot of us, safety course is paramount! I took one after getting my license over 30 years ago. Learned 2 important things from my instructor. #1 keep eyes up where you are going not where you are. Like KCW said is a lot has changed. The biggest is cell phones and people not paying attention. I ride like everyone is trying to kill me. Always keep an out in your mind. I almost for got the #2 thing they taught me is always wear something under your assless chaps.
 

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Welcome from Columbus, OH! Glad to have you back on the road. Your situation sounds a lot like mine. Got my license at 59. Highly recommend the rider safety course! You will find this is a nice site for information sharing, knowledge, a few barbs thrown out to keep you honest...There are some nice threads about all kinds of subjects...Snoop around there is good stuff everywhere!
 

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Welcome you are in the same boat as a lot of us, safety course is paramount! I took one after getting my license over 30 years ago. Learned 2 important things from my instructor. #1 keep eyes up where you are going not where you are. Like KCW said is a lot has changed. The biggest is cell phones and people not paying attention. I ride like everyone is trying to kill me. Always keep an out in your mind. I almost for got the #2 thing they taught me is always wear something under your assless chaps.
Dude I was gonna give you a like but the ass less chaps comment threw me a little....:surprise:
 

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I am surprised. I does that mean you want me not to wear some thing underneath?
HaHaHa...No I am good with never seeing another guy is ass less chaps...I went on a ride along with a LEO friend of mine one night....He took me to some areas in his precinct that I avoided whenever possible . He of course got a big laugh out of it...me?? Yeh something I never want to see again...So I will consider your second piece of advice that you received as great advice...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks to all for the well wishes.

KCW- great advice. I started just riding around my neighbor. I've graduated to the country roads with less traffic on them and just getting used to the feel of the bike. Man is this fun!

Deeksvstarclassic- Just in the last few years I've practiced defensive driving even in my car. Way too many people on cell phones not paying attention! My eyes are moving at light speed when on the bike. Don't Mind saying I'm scared about what other people may do. I realize it's sometimes hard to see a motorcycle and so I slow down at every intersection even if I have a green light and don't see anybody at the intersection.

I do plan to take the safety course soon at my local community college.
 

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Thanks to all for the well wishes.

KCW- great advice. I started just riding around my neighbor. I've graduated to the country roads with less traffic on them and just getting used to the feel of the bike. Man is this fun!

Deeksvstarclassic- Just in the last few years I've practiced defensive driving even in my car. Way too many people on cell phones not paying attention! My eyes are moving at light speed when on the bike. Don't Mind saying I'm scared about what other people may do. I realize it's sometimes hard to see a motorcycle and so I slow down at every intersection even if I have a green light and don't see anybody at the intersection.

I do plan to take the safety course soon at my local community college.
Awesome community college is where i took mine. To save your self some emBAREASSment you might not want to ask about #2.:laugh:
 

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the thing to watch for at intersections, is when its a blind corner and you cannot tell if anything is coming, and no one is stopped on the cross street, so there is nothing to stop an oncoming car that you cant see

I slow down for them all the time, and over the years I have adjusted my commute to avoid such 'blind faith' intersections.

There is one on route 20 between Buffalo and Rochester NY, the little hamlet is called Suicide Corners. 55 mph on both cross streets, stop signs on one only, totally blind corner... YIKES!
 

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If you slow down first it is always the best idea. I had a guy at work that just got a motor cycle. After winter he said there is al kids of gravel on the road you almost have to slow down before the corner. I don't know how to even end that statement........da.... noshart......just fall off of a turnip truck..... it just came to me HWY statistic.

KCW off topic 10 years ago i was in Rochester for training at a Kodak facility. Beautiful area very much like upnorth wisconsin
 

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Welcome to the forum authentic poser!
Wife and I each ride a 950. Great bikes! Now there’s one more thing, pics of your ride! Glad to have join us.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Welcome from another geezer. I was a "pup" at 49 when I took up riding in 2010. I like it so much, now I have 3 bikes.

Take the safety course! Like others I did it at my local community college. You're taking the right approach by building up your skills and confidence on local roads. My first foray onto the interstate came quite by accident, and it was terrifying as I was not prepared.

Two best pieces of advice I've learned and pass on.
1. Never be in a hurry on a motorcycle. Not to say you can't drive fast (That's not a recommendation), but when you're in a hurry you tend not to think things through so much.
2. The bike will go where you look. I am periodically reminding myself of that particularly when riding the twisties.

The intersection advice is also very good.

Enjoy and welcome.
 

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Dude I was gonna give you a like but the ass less chaps comment threw me a little....:surprise:
Let's all hope he's following that rule
 

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Hey, geezer, welcome to the geezer club! You picked a great bike. You're going to love it.

I did the same as you: sold my bike over 40 years ago and just started again a few years back. I started slow, took the class, wore all the gear, and was always watching the surrounding idiots everywhere I went. I asked lots of questions here and got lots of good advice and no attitude. There are lots of good folks here.

A few of the idiots out there have tried to get me now and then but - so far - failed. I was too alert. But I shot 'em in the head anyway just to make sure they don't multiply.

I'm happy I started slow and wouldn't do it any differently. I'm a lot more relaxed after 20k miles or so. I recommend the careful route. As you already know, it takes awhile to get your skills back up to par and us old guys don't heal like we did decades ago.

Glad to have you onboard. Always great to have another 9 fiddy guy on the forum to compare notes with.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hey, geezer, welcome to the geezer club! You picked a great bike. You're going to love it.

I did the same as you: sold my bike over 40 years ago and just started again a few years back. I started slow, took the class, wore all the gear, and was always watching the surrounding idiots everywhere I went. I asked lots of questions here and got lots of good advice and no attitude. There are lots of good folks here.

A few of the idiots out there have tried to get me now and then but - so far - failed. I was too alert. But I shot 'em in the head anyway just to make sure they don't multiply.

I'm happy I started slow and wouldn't do it any differently. I'm a lot more relaxed after 20k miles or so. I recommend the careful route. As you already know, it takes awhile to get your skills back up to par and us old guys don't heal like we did decades ago.

Glad to have you onboard. Always great to have another 9 fiddy guy on the forum to compare notes with.
Thanks a lot.
It looks like I'm going to like it here. Lots of nice friendly old guys like me.
No matter what endeavor you undertake in life you just can't beat good ole experience. I appreciate all the advice.
 

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